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VOLUME III. 
NUMBER 1. 



July, 1895. 



$1 A YEAR. 
IOC. A COPY, 




Published by G. 0. SHIELDS, (Coguina) ^ wn|iam st . 



R EC RE A TION. 



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RECREATION. 

Copyright May, 1895, by G. O. Shields. 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything that the Name Implies 



51. 00 A Year, 

10 Cents A Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



216 Williaa\ Street, 

New York. 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER. 

Woodcock Shooting — " Steady ! " Frontispiece. 

Woodcock on the Islands. Illustrated F. W. G. Johnson. 

Salmo Fontinalis. Illustrated A, O. Pritchard. 

A Mountain Storm. (Poem.) Illustrated Francis P. Owings. 

Crossing the Rockies in '61. Illustrated Major W. H. Schieffelin. 

Murder. (Poem.) ' Charlotte W. Thurston. 

" Heap Good Man." Illustrated Wm. Edward Coffin. 

Es 1st Das Gluck Ein Fluchtig Ding. (Poem.) Dr. E. L. Tut any. 

The Gordon Setter. Illustrated Dr. J. Whitaker. 

A Morning with the Varmints. Illustrated Utilles Baird. 

The Sportsmen's Exposition. Illustrated 

Guatemotzin. — The Last of the Aztecs Dr. E. J. Tucker. 

Signs that Never Fail. (Poem.) 



Bicycling 

Editor's Corner . . 
Fish and Fishing. 



44 

45, 
46 



Possible Smiles 

Amateur Photography 



Pack 

3 
7 
13 
15 
21 
22 
24 
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31 
33 
38 
40 
48 
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R EC RE A TION. 




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WOODCOCK SHOOTING. " STEADY." 

Amateur Photo, by E. P. Robinson, Sidney, O. 



RFXREATION. 



Volume III. 



JULY, 1895. 

O. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 



The AniericanNews Co., Agents for the U. S. and Canada. The International News Co., General Apents for Europe 

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WOODCOCK ON THE ISLANDS. 

F. W. G. Johnson. 



The first of September was at hand, 
and the Colonel and myself had 
decided to devote it to the 
woodcock. „ 

The Colonel's portable shooting cabin 
was already set up on an island some 
four miles from our shooting ground 
{which was itself a large island) — the 
meeting place settled on being about 
six miles from the town where I was then 
living. 

Five o'clock on the appointed morn- 
ing found us in the kitchen, satisfying 
the inner man. Thirty minutes later I 
was at the boat house trying to awaken 
the man who kept the key of the shed 
where oars and sails were stored. At 
last the skiff was pushed off into the 
sluggish current of the Richelieu river, 
the sail hoisted, and with a hearty " bon 
voyage " from the boatman, I was off 
on my first shooting trip of that season. 

It was was only a few hundred yards 
to the broad St. Lawrence and we were 
soon gliding quietly on its bosom, steer- 
ing to get the benefit of the current. 

A large ocean steamer rounded the 
bend, a mile above, and, leaning lazily 
against the weather coaming I lit my pipe 
and watched the wall of white water 
thrown from her bows, speculating as to 
where she would pass me. 

Suddenly a puff of wind from the 
southwest heeled us gently over. An- 
other and another, till the white caps 
covered the erstwhile placid surface of 
the river, and the uneasy movements 
of the gentle-eyed setter warned me it 
was time to reef, if I didn't want a sick 
companion. 

Hardly was sail shortened, and the 
skiff squared away again on her course, 
ere the mighty steamer passed 200 
yards away, her bow wave catching us 
and tossing us on its crest a few mo- 
ments later. 



It did not take long to cover the six 
miles. Just as the steamer's masts dis- 
appeared behind the tall trees on Isle a 
la Pier/e, we reached the meeting place, 
and I let go the sheet with a run as the 
keel grated on the sandy beach. 

The Colonel's skiff could just be dis- 
cerned coming out of the Chenal du 
Moine, a mile away. He had had a 
heavy pull against wind and current, 
but in spite of his 60 years, he has the 
muscles of a caribou, and before we 
could count a hundred he was abreast 
of us and heading for a small opening 
in the reeds surrounding the island. I 
joined him and men and dogs exchanged 
greetings. 

We entered the cover at once — big 
trees, with heavy undergrowth of tall 
ferns and nettles. An occasional hid- 
den stump caught us on the shins, but 
we can express ourselves fluently in 
two languages, so that our feelings were 
quickly relieved. Neither dog could be 
seen under the great ferns, but we did 
not let them range far, and could easily 
keep track of them by the waving of 
the undergrowth. 

It was not long before the Colonel'* 
10 gauge spake, 50 yards to the left. 1 
could not see him, but confidently made 
my way in his direction, to get a feather 
from the first woodcock of the season, 
wherewith to adorn my cap. Nor was 
I disappointed. We admired the beauti- 
ful plumage, and, as we looked upon 
the rapidly glazing eye, moralized on 
man's inhumanity to the smaller animals. 
Nevertheless, our hearts were soon 
hardened again and we were off. Our 
dogs were out of sight in a moment, but 
we knew they would carefully cover 
every foot of ground. 

Surely those bushes to the right must 
be a favorite hiding place ! The ground 
is clearer than usual in front of them, 



R EC RE A TION. 




WOODCOCK SHOOTING. — "THE SHOT." 

Amateur Photo, by E. P. Robinson, Sidney, O. 



WOODCOCK ON THE ISLANDS. 




WOODCOCK SHOOTING. — " GOOD DOG." 

Amateur Photo, by E. P. Robinson, Sidney, O 



RECREA TION. 



■enabling me to see the little setter, 
eagerly working her way alone. She 
enters the bushes, hesitates a moment, 
moves a few yards further, and stiffens 
out. One moment of delightful antici- 
pation and I flush the bird, which darts 
out with the old familiar whistle, and I 
drop him just as he tops the bushes. 

Into the game pocket he goes ; the 
faithful little dog is duly praised, and 
on we go again. It is hard work, this 
forcing one's way through the ferns and 
bushes, and no ordinary wind can get in 
here to cool us off. At length we reach 
the other side of the woods, and light- 
ing our pipes, take a well earned rest on 
a convenient stump. Nearly two hours 
hard work, and only two birds — not 
very promising so far — but at it we go 
again. 

I strike into a soft swampy piece of 
ground, and have hard work to get 
across it, notwithstanding my hip boots. 
The Colonel is far ahead of me. Soon 



his gun wakes the silent forest once 
more and the faint " halloo " which 
follows announces the success of his 
shot. Working over toward him I get a 
snap shot at a bird which flushes wild, 
and miss him clean. He alights not far 
away, and the dog locates him without 
difficulty. I get him this time with the 
first barrel — missing with the second 
another cock which flushes from behind 
an adjoining bush. By this time we are 
nearingthe Colonel, who, marking down 
the bird, walks him up and shoots him. 
After an hour's adjournment to the 
boats for lunch and pipes, we take 
another turn through the woods, getting 
a couple more birds ; then, although it 
is yet early, we remember that there is 
a six mile beat against the wind and 
current for one of us, so with many 
good wishes and promises to meet 
again, at an early date, each boards his 
little craft, and our first shoot of the 
season is as a sweet dream. 



\ 




SALMO FONTINALIS. 



A. O. Pritchard. 



ON the high-lands of Pictou and 
Guysboro' counties, Province of 
Nova Scotia, there are many 
lakes, the surplus water from which finds 
its way into the Straits of Northumber- 
land, on the one side of the province, 
and into the Atlantic Ocean on "the 
other. In times past these lakes 
abounded with trout, but of late 
years the development of the mineral 
resources of this province, lying close 
to the lakes, has injured the fishing. 
The irrepressible miner (in spite of fish- 
ery laws) with his torch and spear, his 
trawl, his net and, above all, his dyna- 
mite cartridge, is doing his work of de- 
struction. In spite of all these destruc- 
tive agencies the deciple of Walton can 
still find grand sport by penetrating the 
heart of the forest. The trout found in 
all these lakes belong to the species 
Salmo Fontinalis. So far as I know the 
largest yet caught did not exceed six 
pounds in weight. They vary in size 
according to the nature and quality of 
the food the lake produces. They are 
of a dark color, and are beautifully 
marked, but when taken from the water 
the color soon fades. They have been 
introduced into the lakes of the High- 
lands of Scotland, where they seem to 
thrive better than in this country, for 
they have been caught there up to seven 
pounds. It has been conceded by con- 
noisseurs that in form, color, flavor and 
"fight" there are no trout to compare 
with them in the British Isles. 

In the month of July, 188-, I hired a 
wagon, and in company with a friend, 

drove from , in Pictou county to 

Caledonia in Guysboro' county, a dis- 
tance of about 20 miles. It was nearly 
dark when we arrived at our stopping 
place. We hired a man to pilot us to a 
lake about three miles from the settle- 
ment, and shouldering our load of pro- 
visions, entered the forest under the 
light of a beautiful moon, and in about 
two hours time found ourselves on 
the shores of Round lake. The heat 
was oppressive, and as the night was un- 
usually calm, the water of the lake warm, 
the sky cloudless, I concluded our pros- 



pect of success on the morrow was slim. 
Then the raft was not visible, but had 
been carried off by the wind to some 
other part of the lake. I ordered the 
hired man, John, to go in search of it 
before daylight. With my plans for the 
morning thus settled, 1 rolled myself in 
my blanket and fell asleep. I was awake 
at the first glimmering of dawn. I gazed 
on my friend by the light of the camp 
fire (who, for obvious reasons, I will 
designate Snooks) who was snugly en- 
sconced under his blanket. He was evi- 
dently in the seventh heaven of sublun- 
ary bliss ; with his mouth wide open, 
"driving the pigs home" in fine style, 
while the mosquitoes were holding 
carnival about his nose and eyes. The 
smile on his countenance was celestial. 
So blissful, so peaceful were his slum- 
bers that I had some compunction about 
disturbing him. I called him, but with- 
out effect. I poked him with my rod, 
when, after some incoherent remarks 
about the windows being open, and a 
big fight with the mosquitoes, he in- 
quired what I meant by going fishing in 
the middle of the night ; so without 
further parley I picked up my rod, and 
wended my way through the dark glades 
in the direction of that part of the lake 
where I had been informed the trout 
were likely to be found, as there was a 
small stream of cool water coming in 
from that quarter. Now every expe- 
rienced angler knows that in sultry 
weather, when the air is balmy and still, 
and the water is above the temperature 
favorable for fishing, his only chance of 
success is just about daybreak, when the 
trout are waiting for the flies to come 
down on the water. After considerable- 
difficulty in finding my way through the 
bush, I at last arrived at the destined 
spot. I took from my hat a favorite 
cast, made up ofOrvis flies. The Brown 
Hackle, the Royal Coachman, and the 
most killing of all, in these waters, the 
Montreal for tail fly. My gear being 
properly adjusted 1 waded as far as I 
could into the lake and made my first 
cast. It was still dark. Not a breath 
of air stirred the calm surface, not a 



s 



RECREA TION. 




SALMO FONTINALIS. 



fish rose to break the monotony and in- 
spire me with hope. I made several 
casts, in a desultory manner, and at last 
felt a tug at my line. For a moment I 
thought my flies had struck a snag ; but 
that notion was dissipated by the sud- 
den whirr of my reel. The fly had been 
taken under the water, from which I in- 
ferred I had no mean adversary to 
contend with ; and that, under such 
unfavorable circumstances, it would re- 
quire more than ordinary strategy and 
maneuvering to land him : especially as 
my cast was a fine one. The fish made 
several desperate spurts and once rose 
to the surface, made a loud splash and 
went down again. It was* his last des- 
perate effort. Just then I heard a voice 
from the bush saying, "You have got a 
big un there !" It proceeded from 
John, who was looking for the raft. It 
only then occurred to me that I had left 
the landing net at the camp ; so I dis- 
patched John with all speed for it. In 
the meaniime I reeled up my trout, and 
getting my fingers under his gills, 
dropped him into my creel. He weighed, 
on the following day, over three pounds 
and might be considered a fine sample 
of the Salmo fontinalis indigenous to 
these waters. During the interval occu- 
pied by John in bringing the net, I 
caught four fine fish and only lost one. 
They varied in weight from one to three 
pounds. 

It was now broad daylight when I sat 
down on a stone, lit my pipe and, as Pat 
says, had a little conversation with my- 
self. I cannot say I regretted the ab- 
sence of my friend Snooks, much as I 
valued his friendship and the wonder- 
ful versatility of his conversational pow- 
ers. I do not want a loquacious com- 
panion when I am fishing. I can dis- 
pense with the voice of the charmer 
then, "let him charm ever so wisely." 

While I was enjoying my pipe, I 
turned my eyes in an easterly direction 
and there I espied my verdant friend 
Snooks up to his waist in the lake, 
whipping away at the water as though 
he were threshing out grain on a barn 
floor. I was just in the act of rising for 
another cast when I heard a loud splash, 
and turning, saw Snooks with his little 
bamboo half doubled, hauling away at a 
fine trout which he had brought to the 
surface. How in the name of fate his 
cast stood the strain I cannot say. It 



was almost a miracle. I shouted with 
all the force of my lungs, 

" Give him the line !" 

He, in return, hallooed, or rather 
groaned. 

" Bring me the net !" 

I answered his demand with all the 
speed I could muster. Now Snooks 
was standing on a large submerged 
stone, which was covered with a slimy 
substance peculiar to this lake. To re- 
tain your footing in such a position re- 
quires great care, otherwise your equi- 
librium may be jeopardized. Snooks in 
the excitement of the moment was mak- 
ing some grotesque movements of his 
body, arid as John afterward suggested, 
" was dancing a hornpipe like a injun 
rubber man." I called out, as I ap- 
proached the scene : 

" Look out ! You'll get in," but in 
vain. He was deaf to all counsel. I 
felt that unless some special providence 
intervened on his behalf he would come 
to grief. My suspense was of brief dura- 
tion. He slid ungracefully from his 
''perch into the water and for a moment 
was lost to view. Then he bobbed up, 
and in his efforts to recover his position, 
performed some feats worthy of a sub- 
marine acrobat. 

At last he stood on his feet with his 
head and shoulders out of the water. 
Through all his struggles he retained 
his hold of his rod. Now, when a man 
meets with a mishap, under the circum- 
stances I have described, through his 
own indiscretion, in the ordinary course 
of nature some one or something has to 
be blamed. Human nature finds a 
solace in venting its superfluous spleen 
on some irresponsible object, animate or 
inanimate. The stone from which 
Snooks had so suddenly disappeared 
was duly anathematized in terms which 
I regret to say were not in harmony 
with his Sunday school training. Then 
he poured forth his maledictions on my 
unoffending head, for not, as he con- 
tended, being sharper. 

"Now," said he, "through your loi- 
tering, I have lost the finest fish in the 
lake. I swear it weighed seven pounds 
if it weighed an ounce." 

He might have prolonged this strain 
to an indefinite period, but suddenly a 
splash was heard, about ten feet from 
where he stood, and, incredible as it 
mavseem, his trout was still on the line. 



IO 



R EC RE A TION. 




SCENE ON ROUND LAKE. 



He soon reeled it in. Wading out in 
the water as far as I could and watching 
my opportunity I slipped the net under 
it and brought it to shore. I need not 
say that Snooks was a new man. His 
first impulse was to pull out his flask and 

" Drink a sweet draught to moisten 
his clay." 

His next was to give three cheers for 
himself. Under the influence of the 
draught, he waxed eloquent. His trout 
was a five pounder, he had no doubt. 
He dilated upon his own merits as a 
fisherman. 

" Did you observe," said he, "the ar- 
tistic manner in which I made that 
throw ? It was worthy of Sir Isaac 
Newton " 

"Isaak Walton, you mean," I said. 

" No, it was Sir Isaac Newton, the 
prince of fishermen. Why," he con- 
tinued, " my flies fell so gracefully on 
the water that no fish could resist the 
temptation. It was all done, sir," said 
he, in a subdued and confidential tone, 
" by a scientific twist of the wrist." 

After this oration he drew again from 
his bottle and commenced his fishing 
anew. I say it with pain, and it is 



painfully true, that it is galling to the- 
vanity of an experienced angler to find 
some greenhorn in fishing, like this 
Snooks, by mere accidental circumstan- 
ces " taking the cake." I must confess 
that I looked upon his superb catch 
with a jaundiced eye ; and for a 
moment " a Cain-like feeling " took 
possession of me. Here was the green- 
est of greenhorns, who had never caught 
a trout in his life, before, in possession 
of a prize that I would have given five 
dollars to have captured. I tried hard 
to repress this feeling, and calmly re- 
minded my friend that hooking a trout 
was one thing and landing it was another. 
Then I returned to my station. 

As there were some clouds in the sky, 
the fish began to rise in earnest ; and I 
was soon busy hauling them in. This 
fact was soon discovered by Snooks 
who changed his base of operations and 
came plunging like a hippopotamus into 
the water, too near to me to be agree- 
able. Twice he succeeded in crossing 
my line, and getting his flies entangled 
with mine. Another time with " a 
scientific twist " he managed to fasten 
his line in the boughs of a tall spruce 
tree in his rear. 



SALMO FONTINALIS. 



1 1 



The sun was now up and so were the 
mosquitoes, the sand flies, the midges, 
the black flies and every species of the 
winged creation that prey upon man. 
They literally enveloped us in clouds. 
They made Snooks the special object 
of their attention, while he was engaged 
up in the tree, in the delightful oper- 
ation of disengaging his flies from a 
bough. I was glad when I saw John 
coming with the raft. I found I had 
caught, between dawn and sunrise, thir- 
teen trout, the smallest of which 
weighed nearly a pound. They more 
than filled an ordinary trout creel. 
Snooks caught seven, including the big 
one referred to, which on "the following 
day weighed three and three-quarter 
pounds. He always afterwards claimed 
it weighed five pounds, and has made 
this assertion so frequently that he now 
believes it himself. 

I wish I had ihe graphic pen of War- 
ner, or Prime, or Christopher North, to 
portray in enduring characters all the 
scenes which are so endeared to me, 
and the undying memories of the events 
of long ago, which it has been my lot to 
witness on the lakes I have referred to. 

Man's short tenure of life is a mys- 
terious combination of sunshine and 



shadow. I have had my experience of 
both. The intervals of the one were 
sweet and ephemeral, the others have 
fallen on my path in every phase of life; 
but if there has been one gleam of sun 
shine brighter than another, 

"One solace in this melancholy vale," 

that has filled my ideal of earthly hap- 
piness, it has visited me after a good 
day's fishing as I lay before the camp 
fire, in the depths of the virgin forest, 
with the majesty of solitude brooding 
over all. To me there is more solid en- 
joyment in landing a fine trout or 
salmon than can be realized in all the 
flowery glades of this mundane sphere. 
And further the happy experiences of an 
angler's career do not fade like the 
flower, or die like the fish in the creel ; 
they leave an indelible impression in the 
heart. They come to him in the visions 
of the night. They are with him in the 
calm shelter of his peaceful home, 

"When all his active powers are still;" 

■* and as age creeps upon him, and the sear 
and yellow leaves are scattered around 
him, he is borne in fancy and grateful 
remembrance "beside the still waters," 
amid the scenes of his earlier days. 




12 



RECREA TION. 











Francis P. Owings. 



In weird dun light, gleamed the glowering signs, 
On the horizon's edge in shadowy lines, 
And the swaying tops of quivering pines, 

Precede the rising gale : 
Instinctive dread of the coming foe, 
Scared mountain birds come flying low ; 
Wild beasts shelter with the timid doe, 

On the mountain trail. 



The crashing shocks — shook the riven rocks, 
Uprooted pines delved in deep lochs, 
Waters rushed and gushed o'er granite blocks 

In chaotic melee. 
Up through gloomy gorge and ravine haunt, 
O'er crag and spur and boulders gaunt, 
Thunders echoed in noisy taunt, 

A hoarse melody. 



By fitful winds, storm swept and tossed, 
Loosened rubbish its pathway crossed, 
Subdued as strength was shorn and lost 

'Gainst some granite cliff ; 
Then shrieking past o'er the darkening crest, 
Wrenching mighty trees with wrathful zest, 
The sheeted rain poured from the west, 

Where black clouds drift. 



Then with angry dash and lurid flash, 

The canyons echo the distant crash 

Of splintered crags as they ringing clash, 

And burst asunder ; 
And the shrieking voice of a shivered oak, 
Falling crushed 'neath the lightning's stroke, 
Mingled loud — as the tempest broke, 

With pealing thunder. 



Up echoing flume — the thundering boom 
Of Heaven's artillery pierced the gloom, 
And swollen brooks splash and foam 

Down the wild cascade. 
With howl and moan and crashing roar, 
Through gulch and glen the thunder bore, 
And trembling ash and sycamore 

Tossed and swaved. 



On rugged crests — the lightning iagged, 
Like fiery tongues from Hades dragged. 
Next instant sped as forks zigzagged 

From crest to gorge. 
Death lay concealed with talons wreathed. 
Sublime — in the dread vengeance breathed, 
As Azrael's flaming sword unsheathed, 

From a demon's forge. 



' 



Low in gloomy lair — crouched the grizzly bear, 
Wolves shrink in awe from dazzling glare 
Of lightning bolt and thunder's blare, 

Of the tempest's wrath. 
Deluge of sheeted rain — midst destruction grim, 
Debris of splintered trees— and dismembered limb, 
And waste of waters o'er canyon's brim, 

Was the aftermath. 



13 



14 



RECREA TION. 




CROSSING THE ROCKIES IN '61. 



Maj. W. H. Schieffelin. 



Continued from page JQQ. 



Our hunting party remained at Fort 
Union six long weeks, while Mr. Dawson, 
chief factor of the American Fur Co., 
went up to Fort Benton and brought 
down a train of wagons to carry back 
the supplies and merchandise, for trade 
with the Blackfeet. During this long 
wait we had some interesting experi- 
ences. We passed most of our time in 
fishing and shooting in "the vicinity of 
the fort, and in watching the Indians 
who often visited there. At one time 
400 lodges of the Assiniboines camped 
near and stayed several days, so we saw 
all the Indian dances, amusements, 
horse racing, etc. 

Three white trappers were found one 
day, only a few miles from the fort, al- 
most starved. They had been wounded 
with over twenty arrows. A party oP 
haymakers brought them in, and by 
careful nursing they finally recovered. 
They were so emaciated that we had to 
be very careful in feeding them. For 
the first few days they were only given 
one teaspoonful of beef soup every 
hour. Finally, we gave them small bits 
of bread, and later thin slices of meat, 
increasing the quantity gradually, as 
their stomachs became accustomed to 
the food. 

We were told that it would be proper 
for us to give a ball and finding, on in- 
quiry, that there need not be much ex- 
pense incurred, we issued our invita- 
tions. The orchestra consisted of one 
old fiddle and a fife, played by several 
volunteers, including the hosts, as one 
after another tired of playing, or wanted 
to take a hand in the dancing. The 
old trappers and their squaws seemed 
to enjoy the dancing more than do the 
people who attend the Delmonico balls, 
in New York, though there was no 
round dancing, or German. Indian 
squaws are not noted for gracefulness 
of movement. The hard work and the 
rough life they lead makes them heavy 
and awkward of movement ; yet they 
did their best. The dancers all wore 
solemn faces, and worked as if earning 



wages. They jumped, stamped, slapped 
their thighs and clapped their hands, as 
if trying to make as much noise and as 
hard work as possible. In fact, the 
dance was a sort of mixture of negro 
breakdown and Irish jig. The ball 
lasted about four hours and cost about 
$10, and was voted the best one of the 
season. In fact, it was said to be a 
complete success, inasmuch as it ended 
in a fight and a stabbing affray. 

* * * 

There was a pet grizzly bear at the fort. 
She was very playful, and always seemed 
to enjoy a wrestling match with any of 
us. One day, however, when outside 
the fort, her natural love of freedom 
seemed to have taken hold of her, and 
she went away, and was no more to be 
found. The Indians had no love for, 
or confidence in her, and she was useful 
as a guard to clear the inclosure when 
too many of them came inside. The 
minute she was turned loose all the 
Indians would leave. Of course, they 
did not want us to think that the loose- 
ness of the bear had anything to do 
with their going, but they always seemed 
to conclude, whenever we untied her, 
that they had visited about long enough 
and must be going. 

■* * * 

Early one morning some of our hunt- 
ers crossed the Missouri and went after 
buffalo. The others of us had slept too 
long, and so were left behind. How- 
ever, we three, Mr. Lawrence, Mr. Cary 
and myself, went on a hunt on our own 
account, our colored man rowing us 
across the river. The weather was very 
hot, and I soon had enough of hunting, 
so returned to camp. L. and C continued 
to hunt, and soon saw a large buffalo 
bull coming down a trail near them. 
They stationed themselves, one on each 
side of the trail. As lie came near, L. 
set the hair trigger of his rifle, so as to 
be all ready, but unfortunately touched 
the trigger too soon. The buffalo 
turned, and nearly ran over Cary, who 
rolled out of the way, and then took a 



i6 



RECREA TION. 




Q 
W 

W 
u 
p 
o 

H 
!* 

w 

w 

H 
< 

p 

H 
O 

p 






CROSSING THE ROCKIES IN '61. 



i7 



flying shot, which made the bull shake 
his head ; but he kept on about 200 
yards, when he made a bad shy at some- 
thing that had frightened him, in the 
brush. The boys wisely concluded to 
return to the boat and pull for the fort. 
It was probably a lot of hostile Indians 
that had frightened the bull, as about 
three hours afterward three of them 
swam the river, stole all our horses — six 
in number — and escaped with them. 

The alarm was at once given, and a 
party dashed out of the fort after them, 
on foot. Lawrence and myself were 
asleep. Cary was reading, and, grabbing 
his rifle, ran out bare-footed, but (fortu- 
nately for the Indians) he stepped on a 
cactus, which prevented his aiming 
straight. Whether all the men stepped 
on cactus or not I don't know, but none 
of the many shots fired at the hostiles 
told. They went on with the horses, 
and we were again on foot. It was 
several days before new horses were 
brought in from the nearest trading 
post, and meantime we stayed close to 
camp, keeping our rifles always at hand.'' 

* * * 

One of the best and most eloquent 
speeches I ever heard was delivered 
here by an Assiniboine chief, named 
'* Broken Arm," at a council between 
the Assiniboines and the chief factors 
of the Fur company. When he began 
talking he had a handsomely orna- 
mented black buffalo robe over one 
shoulder, and held it about his waist ; 
but as he proceeded and got warmed 
up with his subject, he dropped his 
robe to the ground and stood before us 
naked, except a breech clout. He was 
a tall, handsome, athletic Indian, well 
developed and straight as an arrow. 
His gestures were graceful and forcible, 
and though I hardly understood a word 
he, said, I was deeply absorbed in his 
speech from beginning to end, and was 
sorry when he had finished. The robe 
he wore was decorated on the inside 
with Indian paintings, illustrating some 
of his exploits. The next day it was 
brought to the fort and exchanged for 
goods, and I bought it of the Fur 
company. 

* * * 

We attended several of the Indian 
dances. They were the same as those 
so well described and illustrated in 



Citlin's works. The music was very 
monotonous. It consisted of banging a 
drumstick on a sort of tambourine, a 
long note and a short one, and of sing- 
ing a song that sounded like '' Hi ya " 
— the " Hi " a long note and the " Ya " 
a short one. 

One of the Indians at the fort con- 
cluded one day to be good. That is, 
he up and died. The funeral ceremonies 
were very impressive, and were con- 
ducted according to the rules of the 
highest circles of red society on the 
upper Missouri. The relatives of the 
dear departed mourned and howled 
until you could have heard them 200 
yards^, and we wished they were at least 
1,000 yards away. Somehow we did not 
sympathize with them, as we ought. We 
did not seriously regret the death of the 
defunct. In fact, since his friends had 
stolen our horses, I don't think we 
should have mourned so loud as these 
mourners did if the whole band had 
died at once. 

As a fitting close to the obsequies, a 
fine young horse belonging to the dead 
brave was turned out, when two of the 
young warriors ran up to him and shot 
him with arrows, driving the cruel 
shafts nearly through him. The horse 
was buried beside his late master. 



Finally, after six long weary weeks of 
waiting at Fort Union, Mr. Dawson re- 
turned from Benton. Our hunting party 
bought an old Red river cart, put our 
provisions, traps, and our skin lodge in 
it, and started, with the train of 21 ox- 
wagons, about August 10th, on what we 
knew must be a long, tedious journey. 

We had bought a new skin lodge of 
the Indians, with a set of poles. The 
first night out we tried to set it up. At 
first we did not succeed, so we tried 
again, and again, and again. Meantime, 
some Indians, who were travelling with 
us, stood around laughing at us. The 
weather was sultry, and we got into the 
same condition ; but we couldn't make 
the blooming ten pins stand. We w 
not that kind of carpenters. Finally, 
we had to admit our inferiority to the 
noble red man, and employ a couple ol 
red women to build our house every 
night. We managed to tear it down in 
the morning. 

On the way up the river we passed a 



CROSSING THE ROCKIES IN '61. 



'9 






large camp of Crow Indians. We called 
on the chief, and were invited to dine 
with him. The appearance of his lodge 
and of his squaws did not whet our ap- 
petites, but as a matter of policy we 
accepted his hospitality. A large iron 
pot was placed on the ground, in the 
center of the wigwam ; we were seated 
round it, and told to help ourselves. 
The meat was tender, and had a really 
delicious flavor. We enjoyed it, and 
thought it must be a fawn or a kid ante- 
lope; but, as we rode away, Mr. Dawson 
rudely destroyed the grateful relish of 
the banquet by telling us we had been 
eating dog — low-down, plebeian, flea-bit- 
ten, Indian dog ! However, regrets would 
not then have been in good order, and 
we made up our minds to hold fast to 
that which was good. 

On leaving the banquet hall, we found 
that the Indians had been trying to stop 
our train. They were sharp enough to 
know that the wagons contained some 
of the goods destined for their trade, 
and that if the supplies were allowed to, 
reach Benton, they (the Indians) would 
not get as much for their skins as for- 
merly. One of the Indians, while trying 
to steal some extra ox-bows, which hung 
under one of the wagons, was kicked 
down by the half-wild ox, one of the 
wheelers, and run over before the driver 
could stop the team. He was badly 
hurt. His friends stopped the wagon, 
and were going to shoot the oxen and 
take the goods, when Mr. Dawson and 
the four of us rode up. He tried to 
conciliate them, but they paid little at- 
tention to him. Finally, he lost his tem- 
per and drew his revolver. This was a 
serious error. It was at once taken as 
an excuse for open hostility. We were 
all immediately seized and taken prison- 
ers, about 200 of the Indians aiming 
guns and arrows at us, and all anxious 
for an excuse to fire. I could look 
down the barrels of several of the guns, 
and could see just where the ball from 
each would probably hit me. I knew 
that the Indians had guns that had a 
way of going off too soon. My heart 
went down into my boots, or somewhere 
away from its right place. Fortunately, 
Mr. Dawson had been unable to raise 
the hammer of his pistol, and the others 
of us did not have time to get ours out 
at all before we were seized. If a shot 
had been fired, we would have all been 



killed within a few seconds. At this 
moment, the chiefs who had dined us 
came riding up, and rescued us from 
the hands of their men. A large circle 
was formed, a council held, and by 
the payment of sundry blankets, pro- 
visions, etc , the affair was settled ; but it 
gave me a dose of Indian that I shall 
never forget. 

Then the train strung out, and we 
moved on. We had gone about a mile, 
and were congratulating ourselves on 
our rescue from death, when we saw; 
riding towards us with the speed of the 
wind, eleven naked Indians, in full war- 
paint^and feathers, their horses covered 
with foam. They were led by a noble 
looking, old-white-haired chief, and were 
a fierce, wild looking lot, nearly all 
stripped naked, armed and full of fight. 
When I first saw them, about a mile 
away, 1 felt like running. The experi- 
ence I had just gone through was all I 
wanted of Indians that day. Mr. Dawson 
took a good look at them, and then said, 
"That's all right, gentlemen." The 
hangers on of the Crows, who had been 
following us to steal whatever they 
could, began to fall back and leave us. 
The eleven rode up, and stopped in 
front of us. The old chief, dismount- 
ing, threw his arms around Mr. Dawson. 
Our leader was an old Scotchman, a 
tough nut, accustomed to thrilling 
scenes of frontier Indian life for many 
years, but this was too much for him. 
He turned to us, with tears in his eyes, 
and, in a broken voice, said : 

"Gentlemen, let me introduce to you 
my father-in-law, a Blackfoot chief. He 
says he heard that we had been seized, 
and were about to be killed, by the 
Crows ; that he, with his ten warriors, 
could not do much against 3,000 Crows, 
but that they had come down to die 
with us." 

My heart, which had been anywhere 
but in the right place for the last few- 
hours, now came back to me, and I felt 
like going back and facing the whole 
Crow tribe. For true nobility, com 
friendship and self-sacrifice, this act ot 
those poor Blackfoot savages has rarely 
been equalled ; and it shows the real 
character of the Indians before they 
were contaminated by the whites, who 
have, as a rule, set them the example of 
murder, thieving and drunkenness ; kill- 
ing Indians on the slightest provocation, 



20 



RECREA TION. 







MURDER. 



2 I 



and often for no cause, and cheating 
them whenever possible. 

We then learned that when we were 
first seized, a small, half-breed boy, who 
was with our wagon-train, had ridden 
ahead and informed this chief of our 
trouble. The chief and his party of ten 
chosen braves had come to a stream, 
which was the boundary of the Black- 
foot country, and were there waiting to 
meet us, as they could not trespass on 
the Crow lands without inviting war. 
As soon as they heard of our capture, 
they stripped for fight, and came to us 
on a run of ten miles. You can imagine 
what a picture these excited braves and 



horses made when they hauled up in 
front of us. Eleven heroic Indians rush- 
ing to sure death, as they thought, actu- 
ated only by pure friendship and loyalty 
to a white man ! I have been through 
many thrilling experiences in my life, 
but have never seen one equal to this. 
It made me believe that Cooper's Indian 
hero stories were founded on truth, not 
fiction, and when I returned home 1 re- 
read the " Leather Stocking " tales with 
renewed pleasure and interest, with the 
knowledge that the scenes described 
there represented the true Indian before 
he was spoiled by the so-called civilized 
whites. 



MURDER ! 



Charlotte W. Thurston. 

I am a murderer, a murderer ! 

That awful name to me doth cling ; 
That dreadful word will haunt me ever 

Because I did that fearful thing. 

Yes, a murderer I am forever ; — 
Oh, the horror in that word ; — 

The sound of his hated voice so near, 
My wrathful, fiery temper stirred. 

He came when on my silent couch 
In blissful dreams I sleeping lay ; 

I woke, and heard his hated voice ; 
I raised my guilty hand to slay. 

And now I see his mangled form, 
For in an instant all was o'er ; 

His presence raised in me a storm, 
I'll see his death gaze ever more. 

I sprang up from my happy sleep, 

So weak with rage I scarce could stand 

I gave one cruel, vengeful blow — 
A mosquito lay beneath my hand. 



"HEAP GOOD MAN." 



Wm. Edward Coffin. 



IN November, 1891, it was my good 
fortune to make a successful hunt 
for moose in the state of Maine. 
The pleasure of the wild free life, the 
freedom from care, can only be appreci- 
ated by the man who has held down his 
love for the woods and mountains 
through two years of that hard, haras- 
sing labor which the " struggle of life" 
entails on most of us. My guide was a 
full blood Penobscot Indian, a hard 
worker, a good still hunter, neat in his 
person and habits, but taciturn to a de- 
gree, and apt to forget, in the excitement 
of a hunt that the ability to cover dis- 
tance over logs, through brush and up 
mountains, silently and quickly, re- 
quires both heredity and years of prac- 
tice. He had no other faults than his 
inability to plan for a party, or to hus- 
band the few pots of Scotch jam which 
were included among our supplies. 

For an entire day we would paddle 
the canoe up winding streams, and along 
the margin of beautiful lakes, or climb 
mountain sides, without a word being 
spoken. At the sight of game, his 
stolid face would light up, and his very 
hair seem to bristle with nervous 
energy. No labor was too great, no wait 
too long, to insure me a good shot. His 
name was Sebattis, I presume a relic 
of the davs when the Canadian French 
traded with the Penobscots and led 
them in forays upon the English settle- 
ments. He was a fairly good canoe 
man, though I have never seen the 
Indian who could handle a canoe with 
the consummate skill and cool daring 
shown by Jock Darling, the prince of 
Maine guides. 

One golden Indian summer day, from 
distant Katahdin down to the margin of 
the water, the rolling hills were clothed 
in a glory of yellow, red and brown, set 
off by the green of the cedar and 
spruce ; while the blue lakes, with their 
fringe of white boulders, reflected back 
the blue sky dotted with fleecy clouds. 
The sun was setting in a crimson pur- 
ple and golden halo, contrasting with 
the deep blue haze in the east, north 
and south. The air, frosty and clear, 



tasted like wine to the lungs of a man 
from the seaside, and the " altogether " 
was a realization of the jaded man's 
dream of freedom. 

We had been skirting the shores and 
watching the lagoons on Upper Mata- 
gamon lake, and were going through 
the narrow, deep and rapid thorough- 
fare leading to the Lower Matagamon 
lake, on which we were camped. I sat 
in the bow of the canoe, my gun in 
hand, watching each bank and curve 
with that eager hope which " springs 
eternal in the breast " of the hunter. 

At a sudden turn in the stream I 
motioned to a small hut which could be 
dimly seen through the trees. With a 
twist of the paddle, Sebat brought the 
canoe to the bank, and without a word 
walked toward the hut. I quietly fol- 
lowed, and as he unlatched the door we 
both entered. The hut itself was per- 
haps eight feet by ten feet, built of 
rough slabs and covered with birch bark. 
In one corner a rude fire place of stone, 
plastered with mud ; above a substitute 
for a chimney, made from slabs. In 
another corner, a rough bunk, partially 
filled with dry hemlock twigs, yellow 
with age. In a third corner an old pork 
barrel, covered with birch bark, held 
down by a stone. There was no floor- 
ing beyond the rough ground, uneven 
with hollows, stones and the roots of 
trees. Upon the walls hung a few traps, 
a forked branch evidently used for a 
gun rack, several deer and moose skins, 
and a pair of moose ears. There was 
no other furniture, and the air, heavy 
with the unpleasant muskrat odor, told 
of winter evenings spent in skinning 
animals by the light of the fire. Invol- 
untary I thought of the hardships of a 
life which called such a place home, 
and blessed those ancestors of my own 
who had risen through the stone and 
other ages to a point where life had 
some color, some comfort, some variety. 
Sebat was apparently beyond such 
impressions, for lifting the lid from the 
barrel, and fishing with his hand in the 
brine with which it was filled, he pro- 
duced a piece of meat which with one 



HEAP GOOD MAN. 



2 3 




TOCK DARLING — RETURNING FROM A BEAR HUNT. 



word he pronounced to be "moose," 
and started towards the door. Now 
we had only bacon in camp, for as we 
were hunting moose I had abstained 
from shooting at any other game, but 
the remains of a careful training bothered 
me, and I exclaimed against entering a 
house and foraging in that way. To this 
Sebat replied, "This John Seymour 
house ; he heap good man," and moved 
toward the canoe. I solaced my con- 
science by laying fifty cents on the bar- 
rel cover, and in silence we paddled to 
camp. We had a good supper of moose 
meat fried with onions, fried potatoes, 
bread and tea, topped off with apricot 
jam. Now I am very fond of apricot 
jam. We had but three pots, and it was 
painful to watch one whole pot disap- 
pear before Sebat's vigorous attack, but 
I found consolation in my pipe, and soon 
the pots and pans were washed — some- 
thing I always leave the other man to 
do, if possible — the fire replenished, 
and myself ensconced on a pile of 
boughs with my back to a tree. For a 
while we smoked in silence, but I was 
in a conversational mood, and deter- 
mined upon an effort to make Sebat 
talk. Turning upon my elbow, I asked 
why John Seymour was u heap good 
man." My success surprised me, for in 



his broken English my guide told this 
story : 

John Seymour was an Indian trapper, 
and had the true India contempt for 
game law. If he wanted game, he shot 
it without regard to season. Old Archie 
McLeod was a game warden, and had 
the true game warden's faults. Too 
lazy to consistently enforce the law, he 
would for months overlook, almost con- 
nive at offences. Occasionally, prompted 
by fear of losing his position, or by a 
desire to show his authority, he would 
pounce upon some unlucky and friend- 
less offender. Against John Seymour 
he seemed to have an especial grudge, 
and seven times arrested and twice 
fined him. Doubtless the Indian was 
guilty, but he only killed for food, and 
unable to understand why others should 
be spared, he mused and brooded over 
his wrongs. 

Now McLeod's daughter had married 
a man named Jones, and had seven 
small children. Jones who was boss 
a lumber camp working some forty men, 
contracted a heavy cold, negle< 
ordinary precautions, and within three- 
days was raving in a delirium of fever. 
Doctors are scarce in the depth of the 
Maine woods. The men were kind in 
their rough way, but one night the 



24 



RECREATION. 



watcher, wearied by a hard day's work, 
dropped to sleep, and Jones wandered 
out into the storm. By the time he 
was missed the falling snow had covered 
all tracks. All night, and for several 
succeeding days, the forty men searched 
the woods but could find no trace, and 
at last gave up in despair. Clark & 
Robinson, owners of the outfit, offered 
one hundred dollars reward for the man 
or his bodynf dead, and so the matter 
rested. Early in the spring, John Sey- 
mour found the frozen body under a 
pile of drift wood in a shallow stream 
whose rapid current prevented its freez- 
ing over. Making a rude sled, he 
wrapped the body in his only blanket, 
tied with thongs of deer hide, and with 



infinite labor, dragging the burden 
twenty miles to the settlement, collected 
the one hundred dollars reward. 

A cTowd of idlers followed him, ex- 
pecting free drinks and a jollification, 
but pushing his way through them, John 
Seymour strode to the house of his old 
enemy, Archie McLeod, where Mrs. 
Jones was living. He pushed open the 
door without a knock, and stood regard- 
ing Mrs. Jones and the baby in her arms, 
then throwing the roll of money into 
her lap, he turned and went back to his 
traps. 

Here Sebat leaned over for a coal to 
light his pipe. Then, as the smoke rose 
in clouds, added between his teeth, 
" John,Seymour heap good man." 



"ES 1ST DAS GLUCK EIN FLUCHTIG DING. 

(Adapted from the German of Giebel.) 

Dr. E. L. Tiffany. 

The elf called Luck is a fickle elf, 

From beginning of days 'twas so; 
And were you to chase 'round the world for pelf, 

You never could catch him, I know. 

Then care-free spin on your whirling wheels, 

All the wide world over, 
.For whether you rest in the roadside grass, 

Or lie in fields of clover, 

He'll dodge the fellow who lazily rides 

In chariot, drag, or trap, 
And out of the noontide heavens' blue, 

Will drop his gift in your lap. 

Then fill your glass to this elf called Luck, 

Fill it, fill it to the brim; 
Drink, too, a health to the wheelman bold, 

And the girl that loveth him. 



THE GORDON SETTER. 



Dr. J. Whitaker. 



Sportsmen differ widely in their love 
and admiration of the various 
breeds of dogs, yet all are striving 
for purity and excellence in field quali- 
ties. Some prefer the English setter 
and others the pointer ; my choice is 
the Gordon setter, the oldest and purest 
of all known setters, which I will prove 
as I go along. The origin of the Gordon 
is somewhat obscure, yet we know the 
Duke of Gordon was a breeder of this 
type. The name comes from Gordon 
castle, though the strain may be much 
older. 

About 90 years ago we find the 
noblemen of Great Britian breeding 
their dogs to the Duke of Gordon's 
dogs, as they were the only noted set- 
ters of that day. They were black and 
tan, and sometimes black, white and 
tan. The Duke generally drafted the 
black and tan, and thus retained the 
color. The McKinnon kennels, In- 
verary Castle kennels, the Duke of 
Hamilton, Lord Edgecomb, Mr. Joblin, 
Mr. Lanstaff, Duke of Beaufort, Sir 
Arthur Chichester, Sir Mathew Ridley, 
Mr. Adamson, Mr. Pearse, Mr. Stakes, 
Lord Bolingbroke, and a host of others 
bred from the Gordon castle stock. 
With these facts before us, we have a 
right to claim that the Gordon is the 
oldest and purest of all setters showing 
the Duke of Gordon's blood in them. 
When Mr. Malcolm, of Baltimore, Md., 
was advocating the organization of the 
Gordon Setter Club of America, a great 
many writers assailed him on the breed- 
ing of his Gordons. Some of these 
went so far as to assert that the Gordon 
setter blood had a sheep dog cross in it. 

One writer, a bitter opponent of Mr. 
Malcolm's and a friend of mine, one 
who claims to be an authority on the 
origin of breeds, wrote some brilliant 
letters to the English Stock-keeper, under 
the heading " Origin of Breeds." The 
editor said to him in a foot-note, printed 
under one of these : 

" The Gordon setter is a setter, the 
collie is a collie, and we do not for one 
moment believe that either had any- 
thing to do with the creation of the 



other, though it is certain that Gordon 
blood was introduced in some strains of 
collies, and it took genuine sheep-dog 
fanciers some years to breed out the 
rich tan and the flap ears." 

Hence I say that the Gordon setter 
of to-day, that can trace back to Gordon 
castle without any crosses, is the purest 
setter of all. There is not an English 
setter anywhere, that can boast of an 
extended pedigree, but what has Gordon 
blood in his veins. Among pure bred 
Gordons, I may mention Old Moll, 
the dam of Dash I, color black and 
white with light tan ; Dan, Nell, Lad, 
Flash and Myrtle. In the pedigrees of 
nearly all well bred English setters you 
will find the names of some of these 
dogs. 

The development of the Gordon 
setter in this country, of late years, has 
been wonderful. In place of the large 
black and tan that used to be exhibited 
at our shows, as a Gordon setter, we 
now find a more beautiful, symmetrical 
animal, built on proper lines. Owing 
to the determined efforts of Mr. Harry 
Malcolm, the cross bred black and tan is 
gone, never to be benched again before 
the American public. At our early bench 
shows, taking in 1879, dogs were ex- 
hibited as Gordons, weighing 60 or 
more pounds, and not full grown at 
that. The breeders of these did not 
know, at that time, what a Gordon 
setter really was. A typical Gordon 
should weigh 40 to 50 pounds, and 
should stand 22 to 24 inches in height. 

The Gordon has a wonderful mem- 
ory. Anything once learned is never 
forgotten. He has a most affectionate 
disposition, and is easy to teach. Neither 
the pointer nor the English setter can 
surpass the Gordon in nose, enduram :e, 
staunchness, obedience or speed. His 
instinct teaches him where to look for 
game, and he does his work in a busi- 
ness-like way. Such dogs are rarely 
seen at our bench shows, but many such 
are kept by prominent sportsmen, all 
over this country. They keep them for 
their own private shooting and care 
nothing for the empty honors of a 



THE GORDON SETTER. 



2-] 



bench show. Mr. Joseph Lipari, of Tex- 
arkana, Texas, owns about 20 Gordons, 
which he keeps for his own pleasure. 

The Gordon should resemble the 
Llewellin setter, except as to color. 
The nose of the Gordon should be a 
shade heavier and wider, with no full- 
ness under the eyes ; nose should be 
wide and large in the openings ; the 
end of the nose should be a good 
black ; ears be a little longer than those 
of the English setter. They should be 
set low and lie close to the cheeks. 
The eyes must be full of animation, 
and of a rich brown color, medium in 
size, mild and intellectual in expression ; 
the neck should be of good length, 
clean and racey, with gradual rise from 
shoulders to head and slightly inclined 
to arch ; the shoulders should be deep 
with moderate sloping blades, a narrow 
deep chest, with racey front ; should be 
strong and positively free from lumber, 
showing great liberty of action. The 
back should be straight, with short 
loins, strong and slightly arched ; thighs 
must be strong with muscle extending 
well down toward the hocks ; the stifles 
should be moderately well bent and set 
somewhat apart ; they should be long 
from point of hip to hock-joint. The fore- 
legs must be straight, strong in bone, with 
elbows standing close to chest. The 
hind legs must conform in bone with 
the fore-legs and should be moderately 
bent ; hock must be straight ; the feet 
round and hard, well padded with hair 
between the toes. The stern should be 
set slightly below the line of the back 
and carried in nearly a straight line 
from the body. A cork-screw tail is a 
blemish ; when carried down with the 
hand it should not reach below the 
hock-joint ; it should taper gradually to 
the end, with a fine straight flag. A 
curly tail is always objectionable. 

The color of the dog should be a 
rich, glossy plumb black, with beautiful 
tan markings of a rich, dark mahogany 
shade. A Gordon setter should not be 
cast aside as being impure if it should 
have white on breast or on frill ; yet white 
on the frill, tail or feet is a blemish. 
The coat should be soft and fine, feel- 
ing to the hand like down, and should 
be perfectly straight. A tendency to 
curl is a blemish. The feather must 
run down to the feet on fore legs, and 
to the hock on hind legs. 



The Gordon should display strong 
character. The general outline must 
bespeak the thorough workman all 
over ; must be free from lumber, ap- 
pearing like a fine structure with archi- 
tectural design. The average breeder 
of Gordons is hard to please. No dog 
suits him, except those he has bred 
himself. He is cautious in the selection 
of a sire. He does not want one with 
a snipy nose, pig jaw, a sway back, or 
with legs standing under his chest. 
The color must be perfect. White on 
chest, tail or feet bar him for breed- 
ing purposes. He believes that like 
produces like, other things being equal. 
He prefers a dog with a good character 
— not only good himself, but one that 
comes from stock that was invariably 
good. He values family excellence 
even above that of the individual. 
Experience has taught him that fine 
qualities must exist for many genera- 
tions, in order to render their perpetua- 
tion reasonably certain. If a dog has 
a good head, and if his sire and grand- 
sire were deficient in this point, the 
chances would be against his offspring 
if the female be weak in the head, and 
vice versa. Other points must be well 
looked after ; good form, speed, range, 
natural bird sense, as well as staying 
qualities. No breeder in America 
understands the science of breeding 
better than Dr. Jas. N. Maclin, of 
Tenn. 

The disposition should be carefully 
watched. Never breed to a dog with 
the same disposition as the dam, unless 
both are perfect animals otherwise, and 
unless their good points date back, in 
both families, through at least three 
generations. To breed for luck, just 
because the sire and dam have good 
pedigrees, is all nonsense. Like pro- 
duces like only when you breed back 
with a double cross of the same blood, 
and then the same strain must be 
known to be strong in those qualities 
that are most valuable both in the field 
and on the bench. 

It is far easier to lose the good points 
of any breed than to breed out bad 
qualities. All the education that can 
be given to a dog will not remove 
an ugly disposition, or make him loving, 
kind and obedient to his master. We 
must admit that good housing has a 
great deal to do with the disposition, as 



28 



RECREATION. 



well as the health of the dog. The 
popular idea that any place is good 
enough, is always painful to a lover 
of the dog. Many people house their 




PANSY, OF TUXEDO PARK. 

dogs in small boxes at all times of the 
year, with scarcely any covering, while 
others chain them in stables or other 
out-houses, where it is cold and damp, 
where they must breathe foul air and 
obnoxious gases. No wonder the poor 
dog's health is impaired and his constitu- 
tion undermined. Such treatment makes 
him an easy victim to inflammatory dis- 
eases. 

To properly kennel a dog I would 
dispense with the old style box or 
barrel and make him a small house — 
one that he would appreciate, for he well 
knows a good house from a bad one. I 
would build it large, with a hall-way 
wide enough for the dog to turn around 
with ease, having his bedroom to one 
side and above the main hall. I would 
use lumber that joins together. I 
would not use any of the tar-papers for 
lining, with the idea of making it 
warmer for winter. These tend to keep 
your kennel damp. In place of tar- 
paper, use shingles or weather-boards. 
I prefer a double floor for dryness. The 
house should be built so the dog can 
see his master's abode, through an open 
door in summer and a closed window in 
winter. If you have a number of dogs, 
build your kennel on the plan of a 
Pulman car, with berths raised from the 



hall-ways, with strips nailed on the 
sides to keep the beds from sliding off. 
When straw is used the dogs should not 
be allowed to take meat or bones to 
bed with them, as they are likely to 
swallow straw with their food, which 
may interfere with digestion, and have 
a tendency to obstruct the bowels. 
Keep the house clean and change the 
beds frequently. Put in fresh straw 
every third day and deodorize once a 
week. Disinfectants are essential to 
good health. Permanganate of potas- 
sium is good ; about the strength of 
one ounce to ten gallons of water, used 
the same as white-wash, with a large 
brush. ,For the open yard where the 
dogs run, sprinkle copperas around the 
borders once every three or four weeks. 
By so doing you will have no foul gases 
to annoy you or your dogs. 

The yard should be large, so that the 
dog can exercise himself. Only thus 
can you have proper muscular develop- 
ment. Carry out these instructions 
and with proper feeding the health of 
your dog will be good. I consider 
Spratt's the best food a dog can have, 
either for field work or bench show 
purposes. 

Training a Gordon setter is an easy 
matter to one who knows their grand 
qualities. Before you buy a Gordon 
puppy, have a kennel prepared for it, 
and when you take it" home allow no 
one to call on or attend it but yourself. 
He should be left to his new home for 
at least two nights and two days before 
being taken out. After that time you 




IDA SIMMONS. 



can allow him a short visit to your 
house. Repeat this every day, making 
his calls from the kennel to the house, 
and you will establish a habit in the 
puppy which he will always abide by. 



THE GORDON SETTER. 



29 



Teach him cleanliness, at the start. If 
possible, prevent him from acquiring 
bad habits, remembering at all times 
that you must be a kind, gentle, affec- 
tionate and intelligent master. Show 
your dog that you love him, make him 
your companion and he will soon learn 
to understand your language. Then all 
he will need in the field, on game, will 
be practice. I do not believe in spike 
collars and brute force to teach a dog 
what you want him to do. If you are 
kind to him and he knows what you 



Carbolic acid, 1 oz. 
Rect. spirits of wine, 6 oz. 
Glycerine, 3 oz. 
Apply externally once in three days 
and rub well, so as to moisten the skin. 
This will promote a healthy skin and 
is a preventative of mange, a thing most 
dreaded by all lovers of the dog. 

After preparing your dog as above, 
put him in a light, roomy crate — one 
that he can turn around in. Arriving 
on the bench the handler should see 
that the dog is fed lightly, and above 




MAC'S PAUL. 



want him to do, he will do it, with 
pleasure. My dogs are taught without 
whips or collars and they love to obey 
me. Dogs that I train myself do not 
know any bad habits. 

Never attempt to teach your dog two 
things at one time. Teach him as you 
would a child, one word at a time. When 
you know he has learned that, give him 
another word to learn, and so on. 
Read Mr. Waters' book, " Modern 
Training and Handling," and Ashmont's 
" Kennel Secrets." 

The Gordon setter is different from 
all other setters as to coat ; therefore, 
he needs very little work to prepare 
him for the bench. In place of rubbing 
his coat with raw eggs, as some writers 
recommend, feed them to him, and in a 
few days you will see how beautiful 
and glossy his coat will be. Wash him 
thoroughly, using the best soap, dry 
well, and use the following : 



all things that he has all the clean 
water he can drink while on the bench. 



Here are the names of a few Gordons 
that are a credit to those who own 
them : 

Pansy, of Tuxedo Park, was from 
fine lineage ; her mother was the 
Countess of Devonshire, from Mr. Bul- 
lock's kennels, England; her sire was 
Mr. Malcolm's Stubble. He is well 
known both on the bench and in the 
field. She was loved and admired by 
all who knew her. My little grandsons 
would tell her to bring their shoes and 
stockings in the morning, and she would 
bring them, one at a time, and deliver 
them in the same manner as she would 
deliver snipe to me. 

Sancho Panza is owned by the 
writer of this article, and was whelped 
May 3, 1892. He is by I )on 1 1,233, VoL 
V., out of Panzy of Tuxedo Park 13,945* 



3° 



RECREA TJON. 



Vol. VI.; she by Stubble, out of Count- 
ess of Devonshire, imported. Don is 
by Malcom's Othello, out of Grouse. 
His height is 22^ inches, weight 46 
pounds. You can see by his picture 
that he is wide awake. He is kind and 
gentle and loves to be under fire in the 
field. 

Pansy, of St. Louis, is owned by G. 
C. Kleinecke. s She was whelped May 
8, 1892. She is out of Ida Simmons, 
18,689 Vol. VII., by Malcolm's Golden 
Rod. She is a typical character of her 
race, and a beautiful animal. She is a 
kind, affectionate companion, and is 
admired by all who see her. Her field 
qualities are excellent. She is a hard 
worker on game, a fine ranger, a good 
retriever and perfectly staunch on point. 
She was broken by that good old sports- 
man and trainer, F. P. Smith, Wheeler, 
Miss. I must say that Mr. Smith has 
left nothing undone in her education. 



VI. Her sons and daughters will be of 
the same breeding lines as Mac's Paul, 
who is well known to all readers of our 
sportsman's journals. He is owned by 







SANCHO PANZA. 

She stands 22 inches high and balances 
the scale at 42 pounds. 

Lauff's Rosalind is owned by Mr. 
Phillip Lauff of our city. She is a 
family pet, is well educated and full of 
vivacity. She is so fond of hunting, 
that she will follow any one who carries 
a gun, but to have her do her best work 
you must not miss too many birds. If 
you do, she will give you a look that 
will make you ashamed of yourself. 
She has a beautiful coat of black, and is 
the finest Gordon in St. Louis. Her 
weight is 46 pounds ; height, 22^ 
inches. She was whelped April 8, 1891; 
is by Rap 13,666, Vol. VI., out of 
Countess of Devonshire 2d, 12,271 Vol. 




- PANSY, OF ST. LOUIS. 

Col. A. G. Cochran of St. Louis, a 
thorough gentleman, well known in the 
West and Middle states, being the 
general solicitor of the Missouri Pacific 
Railroad. He bought Paul of Marshall 
McDonald, December 1, 1894, for $500. 
Paul is built on the proper lines, and he 
demonstrated this by defeating all the 
crack Gordons in the East, taking first 
money at Assonett, Mass., in November 
last. He stands 22% inches high, and 
weighs 44 pounds. He is beauti- 
fully marked with good tan. Mac's 
Paul was whelped February 24, 1892. 
He is by Don 11,233, Vol. V., out of 
Challie No. 23.169; she by Whip, No. 
11,255, Vol. V., out of Countess of 
Devonshire 2d, No. 12,271, Vol. VI. 

Ida Simmons is owned by Mr. John 
Schlachter, of St. Louis. She is, with- 
out doubt, one of the best Gordons in 
the city She is a fine field dog, being 
especially good on quails. She has a 
loving disposition, is as gentle as a lamb 
and is a family pet. She is of the right 
color, with good tan markings. She 
was whelped November 9, 1888, by 
Don, 11,233, Vol. V., out of Gypsey, by 
Jung's Dan out of Stansbury's Nellie, 
by Milk out of Daisy ; Dan by Sambo 
out of Gordon Nell. She stands 23 
inches high, and weighs 47 pounds. 

The reader will notice that all the 
dogs I mention are below 50 pounds in 
weight, and below 23 inches in height, 
keeping in line with the rule laid down 
as a standard, by Mr. Malcolm, the cham- 
pion of the Gordon setter in America. 



A MORNING WITH THE VARMINTS. 



3 l 




A MORNING WITH THE VARMINTS. 

Utilles Baird. 



During the latter part of October, 1894, our 
party camped on one of the many beautiful 
spots to be found on the Canadian waters. 

Soon after leaving camp, in the morning, the 
hounds gave notice of having started a deer, but 
seemed to be heading in the wrong direction for 
us. Presently, all was quiet. Then, the crack 
of a rifle near by, indicated that some still hunter 
had found game. A few minutes later another 
shot was heard, then a shout that might wake 
the dead. 

On investigation it was found that the cause 
of the racket was the killing of a fine large black 
bear. The first shot had broken his spine, and 
the second finished the work. 

Congratulations were scarcely over when, 
marching along the ridge, the doctor came carry- 
ing a large gray wolf. This was the result of 
the first shot. The bullet had passed through 
the animal's head. Congratulations were again 
in order, and then the music of the hounds sent 
every man to his stand. Presently, a fine large 
buck came bounding along. Bang ! bang ! 
bang ! went the rifles ; but the deer moved en. 
There w ere unmistakable evidences that he had 
been wounded, but he took to the water and was 
found a day or two later, dead. The head and 
hide were saved, but the meat was spoiled. 

We returned to camp in a happy frame of 
mind, and enjoyed our dinner as none but hungry 
hunters can enjoy a meal. 



Our amateur photographer took some views of 
the game when the wolf was hurried off to get 
into the hands of the taxidermist as quickly as 
possible. 

The bear was dressed, the oil tried out and 
put in suitable packages for the individual mem- 
bers to take home. We had several bottles of 
syrup with us, and by some chance one of the 
bottles of oil was put in the box with these. 
One member of the party bethought himself to 
have a glass of lemonade before retiring. The 
supposed syrup was freely poured in with the 
other ingredients, all thoroughly shaken and 
held up to the admiring gaze of his comrades. 
The process of drinking was checked, at the half- 
way station, by the discovery of an unusual 
smoothness in the liquid. Then the sense of 
taste asserted itself, and the reveler began to 
eject the obnoxious mixture, meanwhile using 
some strong language about the man who v. 
put up such a job on an orphan. 

Having the instructions in view which were 
given us on our way up, to keep the left hai 
shore on going down, a party in one canoe, being 
in the lead some miles, got along swimmingl) ; 
but seeing a sail off to the right conclude 
boat had come from the port they wished to make. 
Not being quite certain just where they were, 
they concluded to overhaul the strange craft 
and get more certain directions. 

The stranger pointed to a large black snag 



3 2 



RECREA TWN. 



in the lake half a mile away, and beyond that a 
prominent rock. 

This latter point was to be reached and then, 
further on, a log cabin was the landmark. With 
these instructions the canoeists settled themselves 
down to business. The black snag was passed, 
as also the rock. 

After a half hour's paddling it was suggested 
that the cabin had not shown up yet. All this 
time the mixed instructions for navigating had 
been faithfully carried out and no thought of a 
mistake entered the minds of the navigators. 

Another half hour's pull brought to view two 
familiar objects — the black snag and the rock. 
The discovery was then made that instead of the 



OUR CONTRIBUTORS. 

XI. 

Mr. J. G. Messner, whose portrait is shown 
herewith, astonished the shooting world, in April 
last, by killing 35 birds straight, from five ground 
traps, at 18 yards rise, and thus winning the 
grand American handicap. Mr. Messner was 
then, and still is, a novice at the traps, having 
never before shot in a regular match and only 
twice in friendly practice matches. He had pre- 
viously shot at less than 200 birds all told. In 
this event he was matched with 47 other men 
— many of them of national reputation, and in- 
cluding such redoubtable champions as J. A. R. 

















W, 


I 


• 


* 






r 


\ 


Wv ii "■""* 








^HL. JB 






ii 


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40 i 


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MR. J. G. MESSNER. 



left hand shore being the main land it was an 
island, and that a complete circuit had bten 
made of it. The rock was again the target. 
This time the main shore was discernable, and all 
apprehension about the course was over. 

The result o. the two weeks hunt was seven- 
teen deer, one wolf and one bear, besides numer- 
ous partridges, and all the black bass we could 
use 

All returned home in good health, anticipating 
the pleasures of next year's Recreation. 



"I want to be an angel, " 

A maiden gayly trilled. 
Just then a trolley car came along — 

Her wish has been fulfilled. 

— Harlem Life. 



Elliott, Frank Class, Capt. Jack Brewer, Capt. 
A. W. Money, Noel E. Money, and others of 
equal prominence. 

Capt. A. W. Dubray, writing of this achieve- 
ment, says : 

" It is doubtful if any onlooker will ever forget 
the methodical imperturbability and innate sang 
froid oV the winner ; nor can one ever forget the 
stoical and masterly manner in which Messner 
killed his last bird, making himself thereby, at 
one stride, the hero of the hour. The most hard- 
ened veteran, the most accomplished pigeon shot 
living could not have achieved a more brilliant 
victory nor displayed greater nerve and courage 
at so critical a moment. 

1 ' Conscious of his own inexperience, alive to 
the fact that the slightest error at this critical 



CLEVER BOY SHOOTERS. 



33 



juncture meant absolute defeat ; aware that this 
one shot would make him famous or drop him 
into oblivion, whence he, as a shooter, had here- 
tofore been, Messner, in spite of a most aggra- 
vating and unpardonable balk, calmly, coolly and 
serenely turned to the referee and remarked that 
he had not called "pull." He was ordered to 
shoot another bird — faced the traps, grasped his 
old reliable Parker gun, a trifle tighter mayhap, 
settled the but to his powerful shoulder, glanced 
along the barrel, knowing that the old gun would 
never fail him either in its fire or in the delivery of 
its charge. He called "pull" distinctly and 
clearly, bowled over his bird in splendid style and 
landed in the twenty-fifth straight, the first man 
to get there, with two other possibles to follow. 

" Later along, when Class and Elliott had 
also reached the goal and the tie had to be shot 
off, this unheralded man stepped up and killed 
his ten straight, beating his formidable oppo- 
nents, winning the handsome purse of $760 and 
being declared the winner of the Grand Ameri- 
can Handicap of 1895. Really, it was a grand 
performance, terminating in a glorious finish 
and crowning Messner, the quiet, serene and iron 
man of Pittsburg, the king of the event." 

Besides being a man of iron nerve, Messner is 
a most generous, kind hearted, genial gentleman 
and is loved by all who know him. He is a 
staunch friend of, and a regular contributor to 
Recreation. Several short articles from his 
pen have been printed in former issues, and 
others are in hand for later use. 



Matchless IV. is a capital field worker and 
has been well trained at home and in the field as 
shown by the obedient and graceful manner in 
which he poses before the camera. 



GALLERY OF GOOD DOGS. 

V. 

Matchless IV., whose portrait is shown above, 
is owned by Mr. J. II . Wheeler, Newburyport, 
Mass. He is a well bred dog carrying in his 
veins the blood of Count Noble, Belle of Pied- 
mont, Mamie Gladstone, Count Windern, Bob 
Gates, and other famous bench and field trial 
winners. 





CLEVER BOY SHOOTERS. 

VII. 

Willie Hamm, whose picture is shown below, 
lives at St. Stephens, N. B., began shooting 
when 9 years old and is now 14. He is fond of 




both rod and gun, but his preference is for the 
latter. His pointer, " Rover" also appears in the 
group. These two and a foxhound, " Homer," 
are boon companions and they make merry 
with the game of that region whenever their 
young master is out of school. Willie has 
killed several foxes in front of Homer, and 
many ruffed grouse and woodcock with the aid 
of Rover. He has also a beagle with whom he 
has had many a royal day's sport on rabbits. 
Willie Hamm has shown his appreciation of 
good sportsmen's literature by securing and send- 
ing in ten subscriptions for RECREATION as a 
premium for which I have sent him a 22 caliber 
Davenport rifle. He is now equipped for squir- 
rels as well as other game. 



Enclosed find money order for $r.oo, in 
payment of a year's subscription to RECREA i i' >N. 

1 sincerely hope you may be successful beyond 
your expectations with your new magazine, as it 
should certainly be in every sportsman's hands. 
I am glad to see your high standard of photo- 
gravure illustrations, which no other publication 
of the kind has ever had. JEROME Clark. 



34 



RECREA TION. 




THE GREAT SPORTSMEN'S EXPOSITION. 



The Ideal Manufacturing Company, New 
Haven, Conn., made an exhibit in section 59 
that attracted the attention of all lovers of rifle 
or shot gun. It showed a full line of reloading 
and cleaning implements for both arms, all of 
which bore evidence of having been designed by 
practical shooters and produced by expert work- 
men. Prominent among these were the special 
tool and perfection bullet mould ; the cylindrical 
mould ; the number 4 and number 6 tools, with 
bullet sizers, that enable the shooter to use any 
desired mixtures of metals for bullets ; the well 
known dipper, pot and cover, for casting bullets; 
the Ideal loading flask for riflemen ; the uni 
versal powder measure ; the Ideal loading 
machine for shot gun shells, and the Ideal high 
grade closer. Persons who were not fortunate 
enough tc attend the exposition may get full in- 
formation about all these implements, by writing 
to the company for a copy of the "Ideal Hand 
Book." 

Schoverling, Daly & Gales, 302 Broadway, 
New York, showed a lot of specialties for which 
they are the general agents. Prominent among 
these were the Charles Daly gun, a strictly high 
grade gun for field and trap shooting ; the 
Marlin rifle ; the Wright and Ditson tennis 



goods ; the " Sterling," " Gales," 
and "Gotham" bicycles; the 
fishing rod, etc. 



; Manhattan 
S„ D. &G.' 



The Dupont Gun Powder Works, Wilming- 
ton, Del., gave an interesting and instructive 
display of the materials used in making gun 
powder, such as salpetre, crude and refined ; 
sulphur, do. ; willow wood ; willow charcoal, 
common charcoal ; also samples of their various 
grades of rifle and shot gun powders; blasting 
powder, gun cotton, artillery powder, etc., all in 
glass cases. 

The Overman W 7 heel Company, New York 
and Boston, showed a full line of Victor bicycles, 
and the most complete line of athletic goods ever 
shown in this country — all of its own make. Its 
factories are at Chicopee Falls, Mass. 



Every dog man paused at stand number 13, 
and examined Spra't"s display of dog foods and 
medicines, which included dog cakes, pet dog 
cakes, puppy cakes, cod liver oil cakes, grey- 
hound cakes, game meal for pheasants, quails, 
etc. ; dog soap, dog collars, chains, leads, 
couples, muzzles, brushes, combs, gloves, 






THE GREAT SPORTSMEN'S EXPOSITION. 



35 




blankets, shipping hampers, etc. Any dog that 
could not find in this exhibit, everything he 
could want to eat or wear, would be mighty 
hard to please. 



The Natural Science Association of America, 
showed Mr. Studer's great work, ' ' The Birds of 
North America," in various bindings. This book 
includes over 800 plates, drawn and colored from 
life. A special edition of the book was offered, at 
a special price, in commemoration of the great 
show, and I am glad to learn that a large number 
of copies were sold. 



The Obrig Camera Company was there with a 
full line of cameras and other photographic 
supplies. 



The Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle works, 
Fitchburg, Mass., showed a good line of guns, 
revolvers and bicycles of their own make. 



Hermann Boker & Co., 101 and 103 Duane 
street, New York, occupied space number 61. 
They showed the Spencer repeating shot gun, in 
twist and Damascus barrels, and the special 
Spencer repeating trap gun. The Hollenbeck 
hammerless shot gun, manufactured by the 
Syracuse Arms Company in twist and Damascus 
barrels; and an ejector gun made bv the same 
firm also attracted the attention of all wing and 
trap shots. 

Wiebusch & Hilger, New York, were in line, 
with a fine display of high grade hammer and 
hammerless shot guns ; smokeless powders for 
shot gun and rifle purposes, and the well known 
" Stevens " rifles and pistols; working models 
for hammerless guns ; carved stocks, *.nd sam- 
ples of Damascus barrels in their different 
stages of manufacture. 

The exhibit was surmounted by the letters, in 
electric light, "Smokeless S. S. Powder," for 
which the exhibitors are general agents. 



36 



RECREA TION. 




An interesting feature of this exhibit, during 
a part of the week, was the beaming counte- 
nance of Mr. J. E. Taylor, manager of the J. 
Stevens Arms Co., Chicopee Falls, Mass. All 
who have ever done business or had correspond- 
ence with that house are indebted to Mr. Taylor 
for the kind and courteous treatment they have 
received. He will go further out of his way to 
tell the truth, and to deal honestly and candidly 
with his customers, than most any man I know 
of. The Stevens rifles are all made under his 
.personal supervision, and I have never heard of 
one being defective in any way. 



The Maine Central Railway Company's log 
cabin was one of the wonders of the show, and 
was crowded all the time — inside and outside — 
with admiring throngs of people. S. L. Crosby, 
the Bangor taxidermist, decorated it with heads 
of big game killed in Maine. 



The Union Metallic Cartridge Company, 
Bridgeport, Conn., showed ammunition suitable 
for killing any kind of game, from a Jersey 
mosquito up to a moose, and put it up in such 
attractive doses as to almost tempt one to com- 
mit suicide. The Company also made an im- 
posing display of all grades of metal and paper 
casings for breech loading firearms, from the 22 
calibre revolver cartridge to the great polished 
brass shells for use in naval warfare. Among 
the products shown were percussion caps, primers, 
gun wads, paper shot shells, brass shells, primed 
shells, bullets, metallic ammunition and loaded 
paper shot shells. 

Wm. Lyman, of Middlefield, Conn., has 
made so many riflemen happy by equipping 



them with perfect sights for their weapons, that 
his name is heard in every camp and in every 
rifle club in the land. His exhibit was full of 
interest, and his good natured right bower was 
kept busy, day and night, answering questions 
and booking orders. 



At the exhibit of the Lefever Arms Company, 
Syracuse, N. Y., the popular Lefever gun was 
shown in rarious styles and grades, together 
with a working model of the new Lefever ejector, 
which has recently been placed on the market. 
For this mechanism the manufacturers claim 
many original features, all of which are set forth 
in their new catalogue. Send for it if you are 
interested. 



The Hardware Publishing Company and the 
Iron Age, showed their interest in the gun 
and tackle trades by having offices in the Exposi- 
tion and by printing full and complete reports of 
it in their subsequent issues. 



Capt. A. W. Du Bray, had charge of the ex- 
hibit of Parker Bros., Meriden, Conn., and no 
one, unless it be old Sam Tucker, can talk the 
Parker gun any more intelligently or forcibly 
than Du Bray. His stock in trade consisted of 
50 Parker guns, in various grades and styles of 
finish, from 8 to 20 bore A feature of this dis- 
play was the latest model "Parker Pigeon 
Gun," made in the highest manner, and finely 
finished in every respect, embodying the Whit- 
worth fluid pressed steel barrels. Beside this 
there were guns suitable for any purpose for 
which a shoulder gun can be used — a bear gun, 
goose gun, the special pigeon gun, field gun, 






THE GREAT SPORTSMEN S EXPOSITION. 



37 




EXHIBIT OF THOS. W. FRAINE, TAXIDERMIST, ROCHESTER, N. V 



and a collector's or taxidermist's gun. Parker 
Bros, have been making guns for more than 30 
3'ears, and what they don't know of the business 
could be printed in a short paragraph. 



The Remington Arms Company, New York 
and Ilion, N. Y., showed, among many other 
interesting and beautiful samples of work, a full 
line of the popular hammerless, semi-hammerless 
and hammer Remington guns ; sporting, Flobert 
and target rifles. It also showed the process of 
manufacturing the hammerless gun, from the 
crude material to the finished arm. These parts 
were exhibited in two long show cases, so that 
any one could see the consecutive work in the 
making of a gun. On revolving stands were 
shown the types of military arms made by the 



Remington Company since its organization in 
18 16. The Remington factory is one of the 
largest of its class in the world. It is managed 
by progressive men, and may always be relied on. 



Thomas W. Fraine, a Rochester taxidermist. 
exhibited a lot of fine trophies of field and 
stream, including mounted heads of animals, 
mounted game fishes and game birds, as weli as 
skins of the Royal Bengal tiger and Indian 
cheetah. Specially attractive was the speci- 
mens of mounted trout in the act of taking the 
fly — a work to which the exhibitor has devoted 
much time, care and study. A rainbow trout 
was exhibited, killed in Caledonia (reek, X. \ ., 
said to be the largest of its species yet taken 
in Eastern waters. 




■\ 



'FHE It^gT 

.. 0K JFflE ?IZ>FECS. 



Dr. Edward J. Tucker. 



Chapter V,* 

MR FARRINGTON LAYS DOWN THE LAW. 

As I dismounted at the lawyer's door, 
he came out, and shook hands with me. 

" My dear boy," he said kindly, " this 
wretched business has agitated you terri- 
bly ; you are pale and as haggard as a 
ghost, and you are trembling like a leaf." 

" That is because I nearly ran down 
six children on Robert le Diable." 

" Is it possible." He looked at the 
horse and said, " Allen, my boy, I be- 
lieve Robert the Devil is broken at last, 
and what is more he is ruined, for his 
wind is broken." 

I turned anxiously to the animal, 
and saw from his spiritless eyes, droop- 
ing head, trembling limbs, and short, 
quick gasps, it was indeed true. That 
noble leap he had taken, for his life and 
mine, had proven too much. 

" Lead him around to the veterinary 
surgeon," said Mr. Farrington, "and re- 
turn to my office. I wish to talk with 
you." 

I did as directed, in the meantime 
having the diagnosis of the lawyer con- 
firmed. Robert's spirit, as well as his 
wind, was broken, though he eventually 
proved a valuable animal for some pur- 
poses. 

*Continued from page 415. 



On entering the lawyer's office, he 
pushed aside a mass of papers, bade me 
be seated, and said, 

" You came to see me about the busi- 
ness in connection with the farm, Allen ?" 

" Why, yes, sir ! " I replied, " I under- 
stand you have been retained by my 
father and brother ; and as you drew 
up my mother's will, I came to hear what 
you had to say before I engaged a 
lawyer, for I am determined to fight 
every inch of the ground." 

"Quite right, quite right, my boy," 
he replied, smiling. " But I believe 
there is no necessity of your so doing ; 
you will hear nothing further from your 
father or brother on the subject." 

" Would you mind telling me ail 
about it, as I never before took any 
interest in my mother's will ? " 

"Certainly," he replied. ''Twenty- 
two years ago your grandfather died, leav- 
ing your mother a small sum of money. 
He was a physician, who objected to his 
daughters marrying, owing to some 
organic affection of the heart, which he 
feared would result fatally if subjected 
to any strong excitement. 

" Her father's death left her alone in 
the world, and rather than endure the 
lonely life she led, she married your 
father, who was a fine, smart young 
farmer, but penniless ; and who was 



38 



1 



GUATEMOTZIN j OR THE LAST OE THE AZTECS. 



39 



not more robust than his wife. Her 
small fortune was invested in the farm 
you still have. After you were born, 
the physician who attended her deemed 
it prudent that you should be provided 
for out of the property, and though 
there was no fear of immediate dissolu- 
tion, he advised her to avert future 
complications that might rise in case 
she died suddenly. I was called in to 
draw up the conveyance, and your 
father insisted on the property being 
left to you in its entirety ; for, as he 
said, he was not much stronger than his 
wife, and if he died suddenly his 
relatives might claim some portion of 
the property. I assured him, that while 
you lived they could have no claim ; but 
he was obdurate, and the will was drawn, 
leaving you the sole legatee. The 
following year your mother died, after 
giving birth to your brother. This was 
an unexpected event, as no provision 
had been made by the will for any 
subsequent issue. I believe your father 
would have fought tooth and nail 
against inserting a codicil in behalf of 
your brother, had it been possible, as he 
ardently loved your mother, whose death 
made him a careless, shiftless fellow with- 
out ambition. I acknowledge a great in- 
justice was done your brother, but his 
birth was unforeseen, as your mother 
was an extremely sensitive woman who 
concealed her condition until it was 
necessary to call in the physician. 
After your brother's birth she never 
recovered consciousness. 

I did not think much of the terms of 
the will until yesterday, when Steve 
summoned me to the farm. Your 
father and he had previously gone 
over the instrument together, being 
anxious to find if it could not be 
broken. Your brother's argument was 
that you owed your father board for 20 
years, which at the rate of $5.00 a week, 
with what had been expended for cloth- 
ing, would exceed the value of the farm. 

" * My dear sir,' I answered, 'what 
would apply to your brother applies 
equally to you. Your father cannot 
charge him for board without charging 
you the same ; even if a parent could 
charge children board and lodging, dur- 
ing their minority, your brother can 
prove he was fed and clothed with the 
proceeds of the farm. Again, if your 
father should enter a claim for wages as 



hired man or manager of the farm, 
Allen can sue him for unfaithful steward- 
ship. It is a bad business, which ever 
way you look at it, sir, and I advise you 
to think no more of contesting the will. 
I have,' I concluded, 'a reputation of 
having never lost a case, which, while 
not being strictly true, has been obtained 
by always choosing the right side ; I 
shall reserve myself to defend your son 
and brother if you still decide to fight 
the will.' 

"I bowed myself out, leaving them 
the picture of consternation. Now, 
my boy, let me tell you there is some- 
thing beside the mere desire to get 
possession of your acres as a farm. A 
young man of Steven's ability could 
locate a claim under the homestead laws, 
of finer land, in some western state." 

"My dear sir," I said, "I am willing 
to divide the farm between them ; I 
have no desire to be a farmer, and can- 
not endure this estrangement." 

" You cannot dispose of your property 
until you become of age," Mr. Farring- 
ton replied, coldly. " Until then, do 
not say any more about it, after which 
do not ask me to assist you in any fool- 
ish action." 

We conversed on the subject some 
little while longer, when I left, de- 
termined to retain possession — and feel- 
ing assured that Steve and father could 
not take the property without my con- 
sent. A great load was lifted from my 
mind, but I felt how much better 
pleased I would be if I had achieved 
the victory over Steve in regard to Miss 
Sheldon than with the property. 

His calling upon her so early in the 
morning was evidence that he had been 
as deeply impressed as myself. I knew 
his pretext was to inquire about her 
lame foot, no doubt deploring that his 
good-for-nothing brother was the cause 
of her suffering. I gnashed my teeth 
with rage, and smiting my clenched 
fist into my hand, I cried, mentally, 

"You attempted to steal my farm, 
and now you are attempting to steal 
what is of infinitely more value than 
life itself ; but by heaven, if you win 
her, it must be by fair means and not 
by innuendoes and subterfu^ 

I was called to my senses by a voice 
I instantly recognized as Mr. Sheldon's. 
"Verily, the hot headed youth is con- 
juring the evil spirit that possesses him." 



4o 



RECREA TION. 



I looked up with a gasp and saw the 
wondering brown eyes of Jessie Sheldon 
gazing into mine with cold amazement. 
With a startled cry, I turned and fled 
down the street with the speed of a 
deer, never heeding the calls of the 
old gentleman to come back. I sped 
on until I stopped from sheer exhaus- 
tion, when I flung myself on the grass 
by the wayside and wept aloud from 
vexation. 

" Why is it? " I exclaimed, " that 
every time I meet Jessie Sheldon I am 
making an idiot of myself. How like a 
fool I must have appeared, sawing the 
air with my arms, my features convulsed 
and my lips working like a madman's. 
Even her father has gone over to the 
enemy and believes I am possessed of 
the devil. " I wish," I cried, tearing my 
hair, " that the devilish horse had 
broken my neck and his own, instead of 
nis wind, for then I should not be tor- 
mented with a fight in which even fate 
is against me." 

There was no further object in callin'g 
upon Mr. Sheldon, as he was no longer 
unbiased. He appeared on friendly 
terms with my brother, and why should 
he not ? Steve had befriended his 
daughter while I had injured her ; be- 
sides, I had given them both a shock 
that very morning — they would doubt- 
less feel for many a day. 

I hated the idea of going home and 
encountering the gloating eyes of Steve, 



so I determined to spend the next few 
days at a neighbor's, where I was 
always welcome. 

At the end of a week I returned 
home and found a scene of utter 
neglect and desolation about the place 
impossible to credit. On the table in 
the dining room laid a note from Steve. 
Picking it up, with trembling hand, I 
read : 

"September 14th, 1859. 

" Allen — Father and I have con- 
cluded we have worked long enough 
without compensation. We have been 
informed the farm is yours and we have 
no interest in it. This being the case, 
we do not care to do all the work while 
the owner is galloping over the country 
and ruining the live-stock by jumping 
hurdles. Father says, as you will be of 
age in a month or two, you can dispose 
of the farm, and if you still care to 
study medicine he will give you a fair 
price for it, as he would hate to have 
it go out of the family. Whatever you 
do, give him the first chance for it. We 
intend to take a house in Wilkesbarre, 
and leave you in possession at once. 
We expect you home every moment, so 
you will have to look after the farm 
and live stock, as we have discharged 
all the help, believing you would not 
care to employ men of our choice. 

Yours, etc.. 



Steve. 



TO BE CONTINUED. 



SIGNS THAT NEVER FAIL. 



When man knows how to match a ribbon, 

When woman learns to drive a nail, 
When man can thread a needle deftly, 

When mice don't make a woman pale, 
When woman gets off right from street cars, 

Instead of facing toward the rear, 
When man stops smoking bad tobacco, 

And drinking stale sour smelling beer-, 
When woman doesn't block the sidewalk, 

With spreading skirts and puffed out sleeves, 
When man stops flirting with new charmers, 

And to his lawful darling cleaves, 
When man can understand the baby, 

And woman, petting it, talks sense, 
When man proposes a new bonnet, 

And woman shies at the expense — 

Phenomena like these, and others, 
May strike surprised observers dumb, 

But they will know, by these same tokens, 
That the millenium has come. 

— Somerville (Mass.) Journal. 



THE NEW SAVAGE HAMMERLESS REPEATING RIFLE 



41 



THE NEW SAVAGE HAMMERLESS REPEAT- 
ING RIFLE. 

The Savage Repeating Arms Company, of Utica, 
N. Y., has now ready for the market its New Hammer- 
less Rifle— model 1895. 

It is made by the Marlin Fire Arms Co., of New 
Haven, Conn., and embodies the result of years of care- 
ful experimenting by Mr. Arthur W. Savage, a practi- 
cal sportsman, who spent several years in hunting in 
Australia. It includes the best features of several well 
known systems, and combines simplicity, strength, 
lightness and ease of manipulation. The rifle is built 
to use metallic ammunition loaded with smokeless 
powder in its full strength. 



lie cartridge, with an extra heavy primer— the shell 
holding 30 grains of the " Savage " brand of smokeless 
powder; the metal-jacketed bullet weighing 190 
grains ; second, cartridges using the same shell and 
primer, with a metal-jacketed bullet— the jacket being 
placed on the rear portion only of the bullet, the front 
end of the bullet being soft lead forming an expand- 
ing bullet for large dangerous game; third, cartridges 
having the same shell, primer and bullets as first men- 
tioned, the shells being loaded with 40 grains of black 
rifle powder ; and fourth, a gallery cartridge loaded 
with 5 grains of " No. 2 S " smokeless powder, with an 
alloy bullet weighing 100 grains. These latter cart- 
ridges are made for gallery practice and for light 
shooting. 




The point-blank range of the Savage Rifle, with 
smokeless powder ammunition, is 200 yards for accurate 
shooting ; for practical hunting, 250 yards. 

The '" stopping'' power of the small metal-jacketed 
bullet, driven by smokeless powder, is, it is claimed, 
far more deadly in effect on game than that of the 
larger calibre lead bullet driven by black powder. The 
superiority lies in the extremely high velocity of the 
bullet, which imparts a portion of its energy to the 
flesh and bone, both of which become, in a sense, pro- 
jectiles, producing a frightful wound, which must be 
seen to be understood. 

Rifles of substantially the same calibre, using smoke- 
less powder, are now being constantly used in hunting 
large and dangerous game in Central Africa. 

The accompanying cuts show the regular Savage 
Sporting Rifle, one with the action closed, and the 
other with same open. 



The weight of the gun and the ammunition is such that 
the sportsman will be relieved of about one-half to one- 
third of the weight heretofore carried in using black 
powder rifles. Some of the numerous features of nov- 
elty and advantage in this rifle are : the concentric- 
lever, which operates the working portions of the gun 
and serves as a trigger guard ; the cocking of the gun 
is accomplished after the cartridge is in the chamber 
and the gun breeched up, the cocking being effected 
when the gun is pulled against the shoulder of 
the operator ; shells are ejected to the right of the oper- 
ator ; the withdrawal of the breech-bolt, which is moved 
downward at the rear end, unlocking the action and the 
breech-bolt is retired inside of the steel frame ; the 
breeching-up is in the direct line of the strain, and is 
exceedingly strong and reliable ; the magazine is circu- 
lar in form, and is inside of the steel walls of the frame, 
each cartridge is held independently in the sprccket 




The rifles are hammerless repeaters. The magazine 
is arranged within the steel walls of the receiver, and 
is constructed to hold five cartridges, together with one 
cartridge in the breech opening, which makes the rifle 
a six-shsoter. The weight is -]% pounds ; the length of 
the barrel is 26 inches ; the calibre, .303 ; the pitch of 
the rifling is one turn in 10 inches. The rifle can be 
fired by an amateur 25 shots per minute when used as a 
single loader, and 40 shots per minute when used as a 
magazine gun. The barrel and breeching mechanism 
are made to resist a tensile strength of 100,000 pounds 
to the square inch ; the barrel steel has an elastic limit 
of 60,000 pounds. The rifle has a multiplied extracting 
power on the ratio of 1 to 16—/. <?., a force equal to one 
pound in weight on the lever will exert a force equal to 
16 pounds on the empty shell in the chamber. The gun 
is provided with an automatic indicator, consisting of 
numerals on the head of carrier G, exposed through a 
hole in the wall of the receiver, so that the sportsman 
can see at a glance the state of his magazine. On the 
top of the breech-bolt there is arranged an automatic 
indicator, showing, at all times, whether the firing 
mechanism is cocked, or in safety position. The gun 
is also provided with a safety device for locking the 
action, which can be instantaneously operated. 

Four different kinds of ammunition are provided for 
use in these rifles : first, the regular, solid head, metal- 



carrier, the cartridge being held from end thrust by 
its rim, thus preventing the bullet from bein« 
jammed into the shell, which tends to produce danger- 
ous pressure. The cartridges in the magazine can be 
held in reserve while the gun is used as a single loader. 
If the sportsman desires to lay aside his rifle with the 
magazine charged, without a cartridge being in the 
chamber, he can do so by opening the action and plac- 
ing the thumb of his left hand in the breech opening, 
against the right face of the automatic cut I 

crowding the same toward the left into its v 
holding it in this position while he closes the action 
until the breech-bolt passes the head of the upper cart- 
ridge in the magazine, when the closing of the car:- 



4 2 



RECREA TION. 







ridge is completed. The gun can be instantaneously- 
loaded and cocked by moving the lever forward and 
reversing the movement backward, when a cartridge 
will be taken from the magazine and carried into the 
chamber ; the gun is then loaded, breeched up and 
cocked, ready for use. It can be used as a single loader, 
the automatic cut off enabling the operator to use the 
rifle either as a single loader, or as a magazine gun, at 
will, without any conditions. This is accomplished by 
opening the action and placing a loaded cartridge — 
head to the rear — in the breech opening, under the 
catch B which crowds the automatic cut off C back into 
its recess, and at the same time carries the magazine 
cartridges out of reach of the breech-bolt, as the action 
is closed ; omitting to put a loaded cartridge in the 
breech opening and close the action, a cartridge is 
taken automatically from the magazine and carried into 
the chamber. The locking of the rear of the breech- 
bolt is accomplished by the end of the concentric lever 
resting on a solid shoulder in the frame, which oper- 
ates as a wedge, so that the greater the recoil the 
greater the force which holds the breech-bolt against 
the breeching-up shoulder. The gun can be uncocked 
by moving the lever backward while the trigger rs 
held back by the finger; the action is locked by the 
movement of a positive bolt, which can be instantane- 
ously operated. The magazine is charged by opening 
the action, then placing the cartridge— heads to the 
rear — in the breech opening, and crowding the cart- 
ridge with the thumb or forefinger downward, and 
carrying the same rearward until the rim of the cart- 
ridge engages under the catch B, on the automatic 
cut off C— repeating these operations until the maga- 
zine is fully charged. Metal fillers, containing six cart- 
ridges may be used, and the gun charged in one opera- 
tion. The balance of the gun always remains the 
same when drawing on the magazine. 

The Savage system involves no experiments ; 
it is a combination of well understood mechanical 
principles, which combine simplicity, strength and 
accuracy. 

_The company will furnish, on request, catalogue giv- 
ing detailed description and operation of the gun. 



Quail, open season, November and December. 
Woodcock and grouse, open season from August 
15 to December 31. Plover, snipe and English 
snipe shall not be shot or possessed during May, 
June, July or August. Snaring, netting or trap- 
ping of game birds is prohibited. 



The new game and fislr law, passed by the 
New York Legislature, and which has been 
signed by Governor Morton, makes the trout sea- 
son uniform throughout the state, the open sea- 
son being from April 16 to August 31. 

The bill prohibits the polluting of streams, or 
taking of fish by drawing off water, or by dyna- 
mite, or taking them from a stream to stock a 
private pond or stream. No fishing through the 
ice, in waters inhabited by trout or salmon, is al- 
lowed. Salmon trout and land- locked salmon 
may be fished from May 1 to September 30. 
Bass, from May 30 to December 31, 8-inch 
limit. 

Pickerel, pike and wall-eyed pike, from May 1 
to January 31, except as provided in section 141 
of the Game law. 

Deer — Open season, August 15 to October 31; 
limit, two deer to each person. 

Squirrels, hares and rabbits — Open season 
from September 1 to November 30. Use of ferrets 
prohibited. 

Birds and wild fowl — Web-footed wild fowl, 
open season from September 1 to April 30. 



"DECLINED WITH THANKS." 

The following, as copied from the New York. 
Times, is said to be an exact translation of the 
letter sent by a Chinese editor to a would-be 
contributor, whose manuscript he found it neces- 
sary to return : 

"Illustrious brother of the sun and moon — 
Behold thy servant prostrate before thy feet. I 
kowtow to thee and beg that of thy graciousness 
thou mayst grant that I may speak and live. Thy 
honored manuscript has deigned to cast the light 
of its august countenance upon us. With rapt- 
ures we have perused it. By the bones of my 
ancestors, never have I encountered such wit, 
such pathos, such lofty thought. With fear and 
trembling I return the writing. Were I to publish 
the treasure you sent me, the emperor would order 
that it should be made the standard, and that none 
be published except such as equaled it. Knowing 
literature as I do, and that it would be impossi- 
ble in ten thousand years to equal what you have 
done, I send you your writing back Ten thousand 
times I crave your pardon. Behold, my head is 
at your feet. Do what you will. Your servant's 
servant. — The Editor." 



Lives of great men all remind us 
We can make our own sublime, 

And, departing, leave behind us, 

Toe-nail prints where we made the climb.. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



Editor Recreation. 



Hams Fork, Wyo. 



Your crusade against the Indian butchers is 
all right; but what is annihilating our game now, 
particularly the elk, is, that while almost starved, 
in the spring, while the snow is soft, some men 
run them on horseback, and capture them alive, 
to sell. Only one in 10 to 15 of all those caught 
and tied down live to reach the railroad; while 
hundreds of others, mostly cows, over-heated by 
long runs in the snow, starved and exhausted, 
only lie down and die. 

These are the facts as I get them from those 
who run the elk. In one case, where 18 were 
tied down, only one lived to be taken to the 
ranch. As a rule, the men engaged in this work 
are as worthless a set as were ever allowed to 
live. The work is easily done; the elk string out 
in single file, making a deep trail, which a horse 
easily follows, until one or two elk at a time step 
out into the deep, soft snow, lie down, and then 
any man can walk up, put a rope around their 
necks, and tie their feet together; then go on 
after the balance of the herd. I wish this busi- 
ness could be stopped, and I trust it will be, 
soon. John Hastie. 

Ten Sleep, Wyo. 

A curious sight here, a few days ago, was a 
mixed band of deer and antelope, 50 to 60, on 
the open hills, on their way from the bad lands 
to the mountains. They loafed round in sight 
of the house for several hours. 

Sheep are numerous. They go up to the snow 
peaks in summer, but all winter Ten Sleep canyon 
has been tracked by them from end to end. 
There are enough elk, in season, for good sport 
— 25 to 300 in a bunch. The cedars near the 
ranch have been alive with deer for two months. 
We see them everywhere — 5 to 20 in a bunch. 
Trout are biting and some big fellows are being 
caught. James Fullerton. 



Marysvale, Wyo. 

Have just returned from a short trip up Smoke 
river, toward Jackson's Hole. Saw a great deal 
of game. From one bend of the river three 
moose came out of the willows. The bull took 
across the river, while the cow and yearling went 
up the stream on my side. I gave them a little 
chase with my horse and got within 20 feet of 
them. They had to break their trot and run. 
On my way home I was within 25 yards of 62 
antelope. They are coming in from Green river, 
in their usual numbers, on their road to their 
summer range farther up the river. The elk 
are on their way to the mountains again. 

S. N. Leek. 



On the estates of Prince Adolf Schwarzenberg, 
in Bohemia, over 50,000 game birds and animals 
were killed last year. These consisted of wild 
boars, deer of all kinds, hares, partridges, pheas- 
ants, wild cats, foxes, etc. 



Alpine, Texas. 
Game in this country, with no state protection 
to speak of , has nearly all gone. Only a few of 
the old timers can bag a deer or an antelope, in 
a day's hunt. If I get four or five old bucks (I 
never shoot a doe) from September 1st to De- 
cember 15th, I am more than satisfied. I have 
not killed a mountain sheep in two years. There 
are a few left in the Guadaloupes, but it takes 
so much hard climbing to get them that it is 
hardly worth the labor. J. B. GlLLETT. 



Editor Recreation. 



Marysvale, Wyo. 



While myself and companion were walking 
along a small stream, a mud hen came down 
past us in the water, and my companion shot at it 
point blank with a 45.70 Marlin rifle, when not 
more than 15 feet away. The bird was thrown 
several feet in the air showing conclusively that 
he shot under it. His retriever brought it out, 
and what was our surprise to find its head shot 
entirely off. It must have had its head down, 
in the act of diving, showing how very quick 
they must be. S. N. Leek. 



Oakmont, Pa. 
The best rattlesnake joke I ever heard was 
of a young surveyor, out West, who came on a 
rattler on the prairie, and not being able to find 
a weapon or missile, fired his boots, one after 
the other, at the snake. Both boots missed, yet 
landed close together. The snake coiled around 
them, and the man had to walk home, bare- 
footed, imagining he was stepping on a rattler 
at every step. Wm. Wade. 

A trick with wet matches, taught me by a 
sailor, may be new to you, so I give it for the 
benefit of the craft. 

He took an ordinary blue-head match — com- 
monly called a sulphur match — immersed the 
head in water for five minutes, took it out, shook 
off what water he could, and inserted the head in 
his ear, giving the match a twist. On taking it 
out, I saw that it was coated with wax from his 
ear. He allowed this to remain on the match a 
few moments, then wiped it off, and lighted the 
match in the regulation way. 

F. W. Grant. 



New Glasgow, N. S. 

The Nova Scotia Game and Inland Fishery 
Society reports a steady increase of moose in 
this province, owing to excellent protection. 
The law prohibiting the killing of cow moose 
will no doubt be rescinded, as the females far 
outnumber the males in most sections of the 
province. 

Prohibiting the sale of game would greatly aid 
in preserving it. O. A. Pritchard. 



Bound volumes of Recreation, October, 
1894, to June, 1895 ; $2.50 postpaid. 



43 



BICYCLING. 



L. A. W. HANDICAPPERS. 

Chairman Gideon, of the L. A. W. National 
Racing Board, announces the transfer of Charles 
Earl, the Brooklyn class A rider, to class B, for 
accepting travelling expenses to an indoor meet 
in Philadelphia. E, A. Willis, the New Jersey 
Rider, who competed in class A events last sea- 
son, and Charles W. De Cay, of Laramie, Wyo., 
have been declared professionals, and all ama- 
teurs are warned against racing with them under 
a penalty of disqualification. The appointment 
of the following handicappers for the several 
divisions of the league is announced : 

District No. i — New England States, Henry 
Goodman, Hartford, Conn., and J. C. Kerrison, 
Boston, Mass. 

District No. 2 — New York State, A. G. Batch- 
elder, Buffalo, N. Y. 

District No. 3 — State of New Jersey, S. Wal- 
lace Merihew, Jersey City, N. J. 

District No. 4 — States of Pennsylvania and 
Delaware, A. J. Powell, Philadelphia, Pa., and 
T. F. Mayer, Pittsburg, Pa. 

District No. 5 — State of Maryland and Wash- 
ington, D. C, C. Wollman, Baltimore, Md., and 
W. T. Robertson, Washington,- D. C. 

District No. 8 — States of Missouri and Kan- 
sas and Indian Territory, E. N. Sanders, St. 
Louis, and E. P. Moriarity, Kansas City, Mo. 

District No. 9 — States of Ohio and West Vir- 
ginia, W. W. Bliss, Jr., Columbus, Ohio. 

District No. 10 — States of Indiana, Illinois, 
Michigan and Wisconsin, S. A. Miles, Chicago, 
E. M. Newman, Chicago, and Albert T. Allen, 
Detroit, Mich. 

District No. 12 — States of Nebraska, Iowa, 
New Mexico, S. H. Rowland, Marengo, Iowa; 
E. B. Thrall, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

District No. 13 — States of Idaho, Utah, Ari- 
zona and Colorado, C. A. Lindsey, Denver, Col., 
and W. L. Pinney, Phoenix-, Arizona. 

The following sanctions have been granted : 

July 4 — Mercury Wheelmen, Allentown, Pa.; 
Press Cycling Club, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Century 
Cycling Club, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Prince Wells, 
Louisville, Ky. 

July 5 — Century Cycling Club, Syracuse, N. Y. 

September 2 — Rose of New England Wheel- 
men, Norwich, Conn.; Syracuse Athletic Asso- 
ciation 

September 26 — Mercury Wheelmen, Allen- 
town , Pa. 



To cement a tire to a rim without the use of 
a lamp. Pour alcohol or benzine on the inside 
of the rim, taking pains to saturate all of the old 
cement, hold wheel in hand and apply a match, 
revolve slowly and the cement will be softened, 
when the blaze begins to die out replace tire and 
inflate. 



SMART COSTUMES. 

A New York Herald reporter com- 
ments thus on some bicycle costumes 
that he saw on the drives : 

The astonishing apparatuses that whiz by on 
wheels in Riverside Drive, on Sunday mornings, 
seem like visions from spectacular performances. 
There would seem to be among the lady bicyc- 
lists, in general, no settled code as to what 
should or should not be worn. A striving for 
effect is apparently the principal object, and 
certainly they have attained that. I had seen 
bicycling in other cities, and thought the boule- 
vards in Paris had rare examples to show as to 
how women could dress to make themselves con- 
spicuous ; but on Riverside Drive yesterday 
morning I saw more extraordinarily dressed 
women than I have ever seen before. 

Divided skirts and bloomers I had always 
thought unnecessarily conspicuous, even when 
made of plain blue or black material, but before 
the morning was over I made up my mind that 
a costume with large plaid bloomers, pink shirt 
waist and yachting cap was singularly quiet. 

One woman was arrayed in a suit of blue 
velvet, made with full knickerbockers, tight fit- 
ting blue velvet waist to correspond, and blue 
velvet cap. Long tan leggins completed the 
costume, which attracted no attention, appar- 
ently. Another wore a suit of light tan cordu- 
roy, made with tight fitting knee breeches, sack 
coat and tan yachting cap, with leggins of the 
same color. 

Two women, who rode well, wore enormous 
bloomers of tartan plaid, and light blue shirt 
waists, with gray caps. 

The home made bloomer of blue serge seemed 
the favorite costume, but surely the women who 
so attired themselves could never have looked in 
a long mirror before starting out. 

A gray tweed suit, with long three-quarter 
coat, and skirt cut medium length and full 
enough to allow the free motion of the knee 
necessary to riding, and a modest little black hat, 
looked conspicuous by its simplicity and neat- 
ness. 

The women who rode in the Park did not 
seem to have found it necessary to attire them- 
selves in such wild and fantastic garbs as did 
the riders on the Boulevard and Riverside. I 
saw several women riding uncommonly well and 
dressed in blue serge, with medium length skirts 
and Norfolk jackets. The only bloomer costume 
in the Park had evidently been made by a tailor, 
for it was the least objectionable of any. The 
bloomers, themselves, while full, had some 
shape, and the tight fitting coat had such long, 
full skirts that the ugly effect of the bloomers 
was well nigh hidden. 



The sun can beat any bicycle in the land at 
being a scorcher. 



Elderly Lodger — " How did you sleep last 
night, professor?" 

Professor Larkins — "Lying down, madame. " 
— J V heeling (W. Va.) Corner Stone. 



44 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



45 



EDITOR'S CORNER, 

The August number of Recreation will 
open with a spirited and novel story of ' ' Salmon 
Fishing in Labrador," by Colonel C. E. Fuller, 
illustrated by H. S. Watson. This will be 
followed by a thrilling narrative of "Coursing 
with Greyhounds," by L. F. Bartels, illustrated 
from original drawings and from photographs ; 
44 A Hero in the Ranks," by Lieutenant A. T. 
Dean; "Random Shots," by Harvey M. Har- 
per ; " My Shooting and Fishing Companions," 
by Dr. H. W. Steele ; "By the Camp Fire," 
and the " Sportsman's Song," two charming bits 
of woodland verse, by H. B. Jewell and Dr. L. E. 
Holmes. Major W. H. Schieffelin, and Dr. E. 
J. Tucker will continue their respective stories, 
and the usual fund of interesting notes and items 
will appear in the various departments. In 
pictorial features the August number will equal 
any of its predecessors. 



This is the time of year when the Pecos Val- 
ley people are keeping their grips packed and 
their blankets rolled up. It is necessary for them 
to be ready to flee to the hills to escape death in 
floods, which are likely to come from cloud- 
bursts and dam-bufsts. They have already 
had one of their annuals — a small one. It 
took out only one railway bridge this time 
and trains were delayed only three days. The 
real fun will be later, when the big floods 
come — the kind that rip up 20 or 30 miles of 
railway and wash it into the Rio Grande ; the 
kind that wipe out the dams and that carry away 
stone houses as if they were built of corn cobs. 
People who think of going to that part of the 
great cactus desert can get a lot of valuable in- 
formation by writing to this office. 



Dear old Isaac McLellan, the poet lau- 
reate of sportsmen, has lately passed his 89th 
birthday. He writes me, in a most tender and 
pathetic vein, that he has lain aside his pen, and 
that he can now scarcely see to read even what 
others write. ' * I was born, " he says, ' ' in Portland 
Maine, N. P. Willis was born there a few years 
before me, and Henry W. Longfellow a few years 
later. We were life-long friends, and I miss them 
greatly." All reading sportsmen love old Isaac, 
and will join me in wishing him many years, yet, 
of health and happiness. 



Minnesota has a new game law that prohib- 
its the killing of moose, elk and caribou, until 
January 1st, 1898. If this could be rigidly en- 
forced against Indians as well as whites, moose 
would again become abundant in north-east Min- 
nesota ; but it is safe to say that the red man of 
the forest will be allowed to conduct his annual 
circle hunt and fire hunt in '95-6-7, as heretofore. 

The new law fixes the period between Septem- 
ber 1st and April 15th, as the open season on 
ducks, geese, brant and snipe. The open season 
on trout is May 1st to September 1st. 



In May Recreation the address of Mr. 
Philip Stiles, owner of the famous coon dog, 
Driver, was given as Somerset, N. H. It should 
have been Somerworth. 



Recreation has lost one of its best friends. 
Young Paul A. Ulrich, of Springfield, 111., who 
has done so much to instruct and entertain its 
readers, died at his home on June 7th, of heart 
disease. He was a skillful and enthusiastic 
amateur photographer, and though but 22 years 
years old, was president of the amateur photo- 
graphic society of his native city. His loss will 
be keenly felt by every reader of this magazine. 



Mr. Mark R. Perkins, formerly of Willi- 
mantic, Conn. , and later of Omaha, has opened a 
large gun and saddlery store in Sheridan, 
Wyoming. He will keep a full line of every- 
thing needed by shooters or anglers, and is pre- 
pared to outfit hunters or tourists visiting that 
region, with everything required, including guides, 
teams, saddle and pack animals. Write him if 
you think of going west. 



If you have received a sample copy of Recre- 
ation that you have not ordered, look it over 
carefully. It is sent by request of some friend of 
yours who likes it, and who wants you to know 
of its good qualities. Why not show your ap- 
preciation of his courtesy by subscribing for the 
magazine ? 



I have printed check lists, enumerating all 
articles constituting complete camping outfits, 
which I shall be glad to mail, free of charge, to 
persons who would like to have them. These lists 
are exceedingly useful when outfitting for a hunt- 
ing or fishing trip. 



Recreation starts on its third volume with 
this issue. I have a few complete sets of volumes 
I and II (bound together in one book), for sale 
at $2.50 a copy. An index to volumes I and II 
will be found in the back part of this number. 



William Lyman, Middlefield, Conn., has put 
on the market a new line of pistol sights, that are 
sure to become popular as soon as their good 
points are known. Write him for illustrated cir- 
cular — mentioning Recreation. 



The Overman Wheel Company, Chicopee 
Falls, Mass., and 2$ Warren street, New York, 
makes the only first-class line of athletic goods 
manufactured in this country. Of this, more anon. 



Work on the cup defender is progressing 
slowly but surely. She is on the ways and Cap- 
tain Hereschoff confidently expects to launch 
her before the end of June. 



Some crookedness, extortion and fraud are 
being practiced by certain people in the sporting 
goods trade, which will be exposed in thc^c 
columns later on. 



My premium list is the most liberal ever 
offered by any sportsmen's publication. Send 
for it. 



In answering advertisements always mention 
Recreation. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



FISHING IN TEXAS WATERS. 

Aransas Pass, Tex. 
Editor Recreation. 

Tarpon were never before so plentiful at this 
time of year. Last Wednesday, Mr. Albert 
Maverick, Hon. A. W. Houston, Mr. Reagan 
Houston and Mr. P. H. Swearingen, of the law 
firm of Swearingen & Brooks, lei t San Antonio, 
for Rockport and Aransas Pass, to try their 
luck at the tarpon, and up to Thursday night had 
landed five — Mr. A. W. Houston, 2; Mr. Reagan 
Houston, 2 ; and Mr. Swearingen, I. 

Mr. Swearingen hooked several, but was not so 
successful in landing his fish. This was Mr. 
Swearingen's maiden tarpon, and he has grown 
at least two or three feet since. He says tarpon 
fishing beats practising law. 

The news of their catch was at once sent to 
San Antonio, and on Saturday the nth, the 
following gentlemen left for Rockport and 
Aransas Pass : Louis Frankel, Wm. Hardie, 
Allen Irwin, general agent of the S. A. & A. P. 
R. R.: E. G. Seng, E. K. Bixley, travelling pas- 
senger agent of the Vandalia line ; Jacob Wadder, 

F. Daggett, P. Waldridge, E. J. Cowert, Ira N. 
Turner, alias Potter Palmer ; J. A. McDonald, 

G. J. Spaulding, J. Hamer, W„ Berry, J. C. 
Wengham and L. F. Meyers. ^ They went with 
blood in their eyes. 

They expect to stay at least a week, if they can 
keep Frankel and Seng in harness, to say nothing 
about Turner, as he never refuses. All in all it 
was one of the jolliest parties that has cast a 
line in the Pass for many a day. 

L. F. Meyers. 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Editor Recreation. 

Owing to the splendid work of the State Fish 
Commissioners, the streams in this part of the 
state are so well stocked with brook, rainbow 
and German trout, that there are fish for every- 
body and the tyro need not fear the result of a 
fishing excursion north -of this point. But, 
alas, for the grayling ! His artificial culture is a 
failure and the trout is rapidly exterminating 
him, on my first visit to Little Manistee, 
four years ago, I took fir^t a trout, then a 
grayling, and often one of each at the 
same cast. The number of grayling, at each 
subsequent crip, has grown sadly less, until, 
on the first and second of May, this year, out of 
a catch of 156 fish there was not one grayling. 
I predict that in five years this beautiful and 
rare game fish will be practically extinct. So 
brothers of the rod do not postpone your trip 
too long if you want grayling. 

Among the many streams, within one to five 
hours ride from Grand Rapids, which will amply 
repay one for a visit, are the White river, 
South, North and middle branches of the Pere 
Marquette, Baldwin creek, Little Manistee, 
Pine, Little Pine, and Bear creek. The latter is 
a fine grayling stream. These streams are wide 
and free from brush, affording the best of oppor- 
tunities for fly fishing. A day's catch, in fishing 
weather, for one who understands using the fly, 
ranges from 50 to 200 fish. R. G. Macfie. 



Gunnison, Colo. 
Editor Recreation. 

A monster rainbow trout, measuring 28£ inches 
in length and weighing n\ pounds, was on 
exhibition in Gunnison on the 8th inst. It was 
captured by a ranchman in a small irrigating 
ditch where it had just finished spawning. This 
is the largest trout ever seen in this locality, 
being one pound heavier than the record breaker 
caught by Mayor Shove, with hook and line, 
last summer. The Gunnison river is an excel- 
lent stream for trout fishing. 

Joe. C. Parsons. 



Bangor, Maine. 
Editor Recreation. 

I have just returned from Moosehead Lake, 
where L spent a day and a half fishing. I 
caught 21 trout that would average over two 
pounds each, and that gave me the greatest 
sport I ever had fishing. I brought 16 of them 
to Bangor and had the pleasure of giving them 
to my friends, who all agreed that it was a 
magnificent string. W. C. Hutchins. 



Hanover, 111. 
Editor Recreation. 

This is a pleasant place at which to spend a 
week or two fishing and boating. It is in a 
bend of the Fox river and is nearly surrounded 
by water. Black bass, rock bass, pike, pickerel, 
blue and channel cat, German carp and buffalo 
are plentiful and of good size. 

Jefferson McIntyre, Jr. 



Roddster — " I say, old fellow, can you lend 
us a pair of scales for a few days ?" 

Married Chum — " We have a pair, but sorry 
to say they are out of order; they weigh heavy. 

Roddster (excitedly)—" The very thing; we're 
going fishing !" — Boston Courier. 



Whenever I go out to fish 

I find my basket's slow a-filling ; 

The fish won't bite at any bait — 
The " skeeter's" far too willing. 

—N. Y. Herald. 



In our family there are seven 

Sturdy striplings and elate, 
And our sturdy dad athletic 

Makes the aggregation eight ; 
And, as mamma now wears bloomers, 

We are ready to combine, 
And to challenge all creation 

As 



base 



ball 



■AT. Y. Herald. 



" Where are you going, my Indian maid?" 
" Back to my tepee, sir," she said. 
" May I go with you, my pretty maid ? " 
" My brother will axe you, sir," she said. 

— N. Y. World 



46 



A MODERN NITRO POWDER. 



47 



A MODERN NITRO POWDER. 

I recently visited Carney's Point, N. J., where 
the wonderful plant of the Du Pont Nitro pow- 
der is situated. Here may be found one of the 
most extensive, thoroughly equipped modern 
Nitro powder factories in the world. It is a study 
in completeness and an education in the methods 
pursued in making modern explosives. 

Du Pont, Grandpere, came to this country in 
1802, and established the factory that has made 
black powder for nearly a century, the product 
of this factory being known over the entire 
world. Wherever adventurous man has pushed 
his way with rifle or pick and shovel, Du Pont's 
powder has been used and its reputation during 
all that time has been that it is simply perfection. 

The factory at Carney's Point is the outcome 
of the discovery of the imperfections of a com- 
pound, thought perfect for centuries in the past, 
but which must give way to the demands of the 
present and the future. The Nitro powder has 
come to stay, and the reputation of Du Pont's 
black powder, in the past, will be maintained in 
the future by this modern compound. 

Arriving at the Point the entrance from the 
pier is found close to the ornate building known 
as the chemical laboratory; and it is here that the 
product of the plant, now being tested by thou- 
sands of sportsmen in front of the traps and in 
the field, has been gradually worked out. These 
nitros are not, like black powder, a merely 
mechanical mixture of certain ingredients which 
explode when brought into contact with fire. The 
Nitro powder represents, in the first place, a 
series of long, arduous and costly experiments to 
determine a formula which, theoretically and in 
the laboratory, will give an explosive that will fill 
the exacting requirements of the day. This for- 
mula determined, a reasonably large quantity 
must be made and tested, perhaps to be found 
wanting in some vital particular. Then the 
whole process must be gone over, re-experi- 
mented upon, and so on until success is assured. 
This takes patience, perseverance, time and 
money, besides exact chemical knowledge and 
positive love for the work. Taking all this into 
consideration, it is not strange that so few good 
Nitros have been completed. 

Having secured a practical working formula, 
with a base, say cotton waste, a vegetable sub- 
stance which, when acted upon by nitric acid, will 
become nitro-cellulose, the first step is made. 
This waste is cleaned from all impurities — not 
simply washed, but chemically purified — and this 
means careful manipulation. Having been 
washed, it must now be dried, and until placed 
in the acid baths, the fabric must be kept dry; 
receiving its due proportion of acid it must be 
squeezed and placed in stone ware pots for a 
time, until it shall become thoroughly nitrated. 
It is then washed, neutralized, treated with 
other chemicals and washed again, until it finally 
appears a finished nitro powder, ready to be 
canned and shipped. It would be impossible in 
the limits of this article to do more than give a 
faint idea of the various steps of the many going 
to make up the completion of a batch of nitro pow- 
der. Enough has been said to show what a 
wonderful intricate business it is, and to give 
some idea as to how difficult it has been to make 
small batches that will hold up to the laboratory 



standard First, the completed nitro must have 
a hard grain, in order to resist atmospheric 
changes, and still be porous and sensitive to the 
heat and flame of the primer. Second, it must 
give the highest velocity possible, with a mini- 
mum gas pressure, and third, it must be stable, 
always giving the same results , independent of 
weather or temperature, or other atmospheric 
vicissitudes to which it may be subjected. 

Nearly every process is conducted in a sepa- 
rate building, and the ten or a dozen necessary are 
substantially built, steam-heated and electric 
lighted. Everything about the factory is most 
complete and of the best. Such machinery as 
has not been specially invented by the Du Ponts 
is of the latest type, and everything is in perfect 
order. 

Having followed the waste from the bale to 
the tin can in which the powder is packed and 
shipped, it may not be uninteresting to see how 
the finished powder is tested. This is done in a 
separate building, one side of which is all glass. 
Facing this building is another, 40 yards away. 
This latter building is sheathed with sheet iron, 
on the side next the testing house, and this is 
pierced with two round holes, about four feet in 
diameter ; inside of one of these is an ingenious 
arrangement for holding the large paper targets 
which show the " pattern " given with a charge 
of powder and shot. In front of the other is a 
machine which, by electricity, registers the ex- 
act instant the charge of shot strikes the plate. 
As the charge leaves the muzzle of the gun, it 
closes a circuit and registers the instant of leav- 
ing. Having now the time the shot left the gun 
and the time it struck the plate, the exact dis- 
tance being known, it is a simple matter to 
figure out the velocity of the charge. The 
" gas pressure " or the bursting power of the 
powder, is found byan equally ingenious and 
reasonably exact gauge. You want the pressure 
of 2% drams of powder, with a certain wadding, 
and \\ ounces of shot, from a 12 gauge gun. 
Every gauge of shot gun is represented in this 
testing house, by a barrel, with a hole in the 
upper circumference, and this hole, when the 
barrel is fitted into the guage, corresponds with 
another in the gauge itself. A mechanism at- 
tached fires the charge and sufficient force is 
expended through this hole to push up a mechan- 
ism, between the parts of which and la direct 
line of the force, has been placed a bit of cop- 
per, of a certain length and diameter ; the press- 
ure exerted upon the gauge crushes the copper, 
or rather squeezes it in its length. The loss in its 
length is measured by an accurate, specially made 
caliper, and from the loss is deduced the so 
called " gas pressure." 

Every one who has done much shooting knows 
something of this Du Pont nitro. Though so 
recently introduced, the wonderful scores made 
by various experts and amateurs, notably Mr. 
Messner's in winning the American Handicap, 
has already pushed it to the front, and the fact 
that so much care has been and is being given to 
its manufacture, combined with its intrinsic value 
will keep it there. The following points are of 
interest to the trap and field shooter ; first, lack 
of recoil ; second, lack of smoke ; third, little or 
no solid residuum ; fourth, such residuum as 
there is, is alkaline and not deliquescent. This 
lessens the chance of rusting the barrel from 



4 8 



RECREA TION. 



solid particles that are hydroscopic. This is 
true, not only of the Du Pont shot gun powder, 
but of the Du Pont rifle powder as well. Fifth, 
the compound is stable, resisting atmospheric 
changes to a marked degree ; sixth, it has an 
extremely hard, yet porous grain, due to process 
of manufacture and not to after treatment ; 
seventh, the extreme care and watchfulness given 
to its manufacture makes it well nigh impossible 
for batches to vary in gas pressure or velocity ; 
eighth, maximum velocity with minimum gas 
pressure or strain upon the gun barrel ; ninth, 
relatively small bulk of charge and its complete 
transformation into gas, resulting in' a definite 
equality between amount of powder and amount 
of propelling power ; tenth, it is an American 
product, formulated by American chemists, whc 
were trained in American laboratories, and as 
such, surely merits the confidence and attention 
of American trap and field shooters. 

There is at the Du Pont factory a handsome 
little 23 single shot Winchester rifle, with long 
cartridge, loaded with a Du Pont rifle nitro and 
a nickle plated bullet, that ground a deep hole 
in a heavy wrought iron plate at 100 feet range, 
and which, at 200 yards, would have punched a 
neat round hole in the same plate ; there is a 30 
calibre army rifle and its cartridge, also loaded 
with Du Pont rifle nitro, and other things too 
numerous to mention. Carney's Point, with its 
wonderful plant, bids fair to become as famous, 
in its day, as its predecessor on the other side of 
Wilmington and the present nitros, and others in 
a more embryonic condition, that will in due 
time make their debut, will prove as efficacious 
and perfect in their way as has the Du Pont 
black powder. 

Samuel J. Fort, M. D. 



POSSIBLE SMILES. 



HUDSON RIVER BY DAYLIGHT. 

The "Albany" and the "New York," the 
steamers of the Day Line, are two of the most 
elpgant steamers in the world. They are large 
and commodious ; there is an abundance of com- 
fortable seats, and a good restaurant is located on 
the main deck, where you can enjoy a good din- 
ner, and at the same time look out upon the 
beautiful scenery of the river. When the boat 
leaves the dock you leave the bustle and hum be- 
hind you, and enter, as it were, upon a new ex- 
istence. Now you can stop hurrying for a time, 
at least, and at your leisure can take in the 
marvellous beauties of the river as they unfold 
before your eyes. To float upon the bosom of 
the majestic Hudson, to gaze upon the mighty 
hills that fringe its banks, to view those quaint 
but familiar collections of river craft being towed 
along, scarcely seeming to move ; all these, and 
a myriad of other experiences, are familiar to 
those who have had the good sense or the good 
fortune to make the trip between New York and 
Albany by the day boat. From the time the 
boat pushes majestically out into the river till it 
touches the dock at the end of the route, a suc- 
cession of magnificent panoramas is spread be- 
fore the tourist. Too much cannot be said re- 
garding the arrangements which have been made 
for the comfort and pleasure of those who adopt 
this method of travel 



Editor Recreation 



Buffalo, N. Y. 



A good' story comes from the arid plains of 
New Mexico. A certain lady, who had lately 
gone there with her family, had been given a 
rifle, and was anxious to kill something. She was 
invited to join a party for a drive, one day, and 
took the new rifle along. As the team sped over 
the prairie, a long-eared jack-rabbit started from 
beneath a sage brush, leaped away a short dis- 
tance, and stopped to gaze at the intruders. Mrs. 
M. grasped her rifle eagerly, and shouted: 

" Oh, look at the young antelope ! Wait, let 
me shoot it!" 

The team was stopped, and the game waited 
to be killed, but the peals of laughter from the 
more knowing members of the party, so startled 
the little woman that she forgot to shoot. 

"Well, what is it then?" she demanded, in- 
dignantly. ■ 

"Oh, it's only a New Mexico sailor — other- 
wise a jack-rabbit," said the driver. 

The lady was so chagrined that she declined 
to shoot at any more "game" that day, and her 
friends have not yet ceased to remind her of her 
" first antelope." C. C. B. 



First New Yorker — " I wish I knew where 
that pretty girl who lives next door to me is going 
this summer." 

Second New Yorker—" Why ?" 

First New Yorker — " I would like to go there 
and get acquainted with her." — N. Y. Herald. 



"Why are they called pyramids, pa?" asked 
Georgie, who was looking at a picture of those 
wonders of Egypt. 

" They are called pyramids, my son, because 
they appear amid the general desolation of the 
desert."— N. Y. Herald. 



What kind of writing is that ?" said he 
To the maid at the typewriter, awkwardly, 
She thumped the keys in her saucy way, 
And said, with a smile, to the rustic jay, 
Who wondered much at the queer machine : — 
It's a patent write, if that's what you mean." 
— Detroit Free Press. 



Roxlie — 'Well, neither of us caught many fish, 
but between us we have a good string ? " 

Hoxlie — " Yes, your six and my five will 
leaven the whole catch." 



Sharpleigh — " This free coinage question bids 
fair to involve the country in another big fight?" 

Up-to-Date — " Yes, a war of the rebullion, so 
to speak." 



The rain descends upon the plant, 

And makes it grow the taller ; 
But when it strikes the summer pant 

It's apt to make that smaller. 

— Detroit Tribune. 



RECREA TION. 



49 




u. s. 



RAPID 

Shot Shell 




FOR 



Nitro 
Powders 



Penetration increased with pattern 15 per cent, improved. Results 

same with every shell. None so regular ever produced before. 

Head of shell and battery cup one piece of metal. No 

gas escape, no balling of shot, no upsetting of charge. 



U. S. CARTRIDGE CO 



AGENTSS: 

U. T. HUNGERFORD, 

29 Chambers St., N. Y. City. 
CHAS. SONNTAG CO., 

San Francisco Cal. 



Lowell, Mass 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



WHAT I USE AND WHY. 

Since the reproduction in Recreation of a 
few of my photographs, brother amateurs are 
writing me to know what camera and what lense 
I use ; what plates and developer 1 recommend ; 
how I do my work, etc. 

I was decoyed into the art of amateur pho- 
tography a number Of years ago by receiving, as a 
present, a little Harvard outfit, complete, for 
laking and finishing photographs, and which, I 
afterwards learned, cost just two dollars and a 
half ; and the experience gained thereby was 
both invaluable and inexpensive. 

My next camera was a 5x7; then a 4x5 Sco- 
ville Knack ($17.50), with which the picture of 
trie children, published in Recreation, was 
taken. Besides this, I have a 5x7 Rochester 
Optical Company's box, fitted with a Somerville 
No. 1 lense ($20). This lense is, in my estima- 
tion, the finest for the money on the market, for 
both portraits and landscape work. A good 
lense is the foundation of successful photogra- 
phy — the most important requisite. 

If you can afford it, have both a large sized 
tripod camera and a small hand box ; the former 
for groups, portraits and architectural, work ; the 
other for moving objects, and for a traveling com- 
panion. Don't start on a trip without a roll of film. 
Glass plates are too bulky, too heavy, and cannot 
be easily changed. I buy my plates from our city 
photographers. In that way I am sure of get- 
ting a reliable brand of fresh plates, as needed. 
Do not experiment with every brand of plates, 
but stick to the old and reliable. 

As to developers. " The woods aie lull of 
'em " — good ones, too— any one of which needs 
only to be understood and persistently used to 
give good results. This dabbling in every new 
solution that comes along is enough to discour- 
age any amateur. If on a trip, take along pow- 
derr Do not risk spoiling your best clothes by 
putting solutions in your trunk. You can get 
Eastman powders for 60 cents, equal to 96 
ounces of mixed solution. At home I always 
mix my own developer, because there is a fasci- 
nation about the chemical processes. However, 
I have had to throw away an entire quantity of 
new developer on account of some unaccount- 
able mistake arising from the carelessness, either 
of the druggist, or, more likely, of myself. Pyro. 
is my stand-by. 

If you want to sip the honey-sweetness from 
the lovely flower of photography, do all your 
own work. Be not content till you are master 
of the art in all its processes, from alpha to 
omega. I have had great trials and tribulations, 
printing and fixing my pictures, some of which I 
may some time describe for the readers of 
Recreation. 

The reason I give names of makers of my 
cameras is that I have oiten been disappointed 
when reading articles on this subject, wherein 
the author had omitted just what I wanted to 
know, i.e., what make he used. 

Why not be practical ? 

Paul A. Ulrich. 



Editor Recreation. 

"J. H. J." is all at sea when he asks for for- 
mulae to combine metol-eikonogen and pyro 
glycin. These developing salts should never be 
combined, as they have a similar action. Metol 
hauff should be combined (if a combination is 
desired) with glycin hauff, as metol hauff gives 
detail, glycin hauff density, and the combination 
carries the good quality of both. Metol can also 
be combined with hydrochinon or pyro. , but the 
result is not nearly so good. The best formula 
I have found, for all around work, is the fol- 
lowing : 

Hot water must be used with this formula. 
10 ozs. sulphite soda solution, at 30 degrees hy- 
drometer test, hot. 
Add 30 grains metol hauff. 
Add 30 grains glycin hauff. 

Add 10 ozs. carb. potass, solution, 16 degrees 
hydrometer test, hot. 

Allow this to cool and settle, and if it shows a 
sediment, it should be filtered. Be careful to use 
a hydrometer which, by the way, should be used 
in making all developing solutions, as it corrects 
any difference in the strength of chemicals. 

Brains. 



New York. 
Editor Recreation. 

I would like to suggest to Chas. H. Worcester 
that he select, for his trip to the woods, a Fold- 
ing Montauk Camera, fitted with a Ross-Goerz 
lens, as this is undoubtedly the most compact 
and ' ' professional " outfit he could secure. It is 
difficult to get good pictures in the woods, on 
account of the shadows — light and heavy — that 
are ever present, and the most rapid lens is nec- 
essary for the work. The Ross-Zeiss, Ross 
Universal Symmetrical and the Ross-Goerz 
lenses are the most rapid extant, and should 
be selected for this class of work. These, 
as well as the Folding Montauk Camera, are 
sold by G Genert, 24 East 13th street, New 
York, who shows his good judgment by adver- 
tising his goods in Recreation. 

Chas. H. Turner. 



A valuable hint to amateur photographers is 
contained in the picture of an English setter, 
printed on another page of this issue. Many 
beautiful and interesting studies in posing, as 
well as in animal photography in general, may 
be obtained by experimenting with a well trained 
dog, horse, or other pet animal. If you are not 
fortunate enough to own such a companion your- 
self, inquire among your friends, and you may 
find a subject that will afford you many an hour 
of pleasant and profitable experiment. 



Don't forget to send samples of your best 
work to Recreation — especially of all novelties 
in the way of out-door work. 

I have nothing but praise for your magazine 
and congratulate you most sincerely. 

J. Emerson Smith. 



50 



RECREATION. 



vn 



THE FOLDING MONTAUK. '95 Prizewinner. 

The Folding Montauk combines the experience of our friends with other cameras and our own ingenuity to the end 
that it has all modern improvements and a number of new features. It has swings, adjustable front, etc., etc., of our 
own design. In finish it surpasses all others, and is undoubtedly a thing of beauty and a joy forever. 

Will make Snap Shots in all 
Kinds of Weather. 




There is Nothing Equal to our 

Camera. Don't take the 

so-called Just as Good. 



PRICE. 

Fitted with Gundlach Double 

Rapid Rectilinear Lens 

and Shutter. 

For Pictures 4x5, $25.00 

5 x 7, 32.50 

6#x 8tf, 50.00 

8 x 10, 75.00 



Pointer ! 

You may be certain of one 
thing, no Lens is equal to a 
ROSS, London made. If you 
can afford it have one fitted to 
your camera at once. 



Invitation. 

You are cordially invited to 
inspect our warerooms, the larg- 
est and handsomest In the world, 
and examine our complete stock 
of everything pertaining to pho- 
tography. 



C. GENNERT, 24 and 26 East Thirteenth Street, New York. 




this year, We want you to ride. 



Boston 

New York 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

San Francisco 



POPE A\FG. CO. 

General Offices and Factories, HARTFORD, Conn. 

We shall take pleasure in sending you the 

handsomest Bicycle Catalogue ever issued, for 
postage—four cents; or the hook is free from any 
Columbia agent. 




Vlll 



RECREATION. 



SNOBS IN BUSINESS. 



Editor Recreation 



Denver, Col. 



Some New York business men practice a 
kind of snobbery that is simply disgusting to a 
broad gauge free-thinking hustler, no matter 
where he hails from. They act as if afraid they 
might be contaminated if they should come in 
contact with a caller before he had been quaran- 
tined, inspected, and then properly vouched for 
by their office boy: If the head of the concern 
happens to be in the front office when a stranger 
enters he will glare at him, retreat into his back 
room and send the office boy to " see what that 
man wants." 

I could give many instances of losses that have 
accrued to such snobs by reason of this affected 
exclusiveness. An officer of a western railway 
called on one of the bank note companies here to 
place a three thousand dollar order for engraving 
bonds. He brought a letter of introduction from 
the governor of a western State to the president 
of the bank note company — these two having 
been schoolmates. The railway man preferred 
to see the bank note man and present the letter 
in person — in fact had been requested to do so. 
He handed his card to the office boy and asked 
him to hand it to the president and say that he 
would like to see that gentleman on important 
business. This brought out the president's 
private secretary who said that Mr. Almighty 
was very busy — and could he not state his busi- 
ness to him — the secretary. 

Mr. Westerner was nettled. He told the sec- 
retary that this was not the way in which he 
treated men when they called on him. His 
business was with the president of the company 
first, and he did not care to state it to any one else. 

The secretary returned to the sanctum, and 
a consultation was held which ended in the 
president ordering his subordinate to " show 
the — fool in." The clerk went to do his bidding 
but the stranger was gone. He had left a mes- 
sage with another clerk that the latter was afraid 
to deliver to "the old man." The railway man 
went to another bank note company where he 
was pleasantly received and cordially treated. 
Within half an hour he had placed his order. 

Once when connected with a large corporation 
in the West, I came here to place an order for 
$1,200 worth of advertising. I called on an ad- 
vertising agent in Park Row, and when I went 
in the principal happened to be in the front room. 
I had met him once before and knew him, so 1 
ventured to say "good morning." He glared at 
me and called the office boy to take my card. 

I surrendered it as gracefully as possible. 
The boy handed it to Mr. Snob, who looked at it, 
and told the boy to tell me to take a seat in the 
hall, that he was busy and would see me in his 
private office in a few minutes. 

I stepped up to the office, told Mr. Snob to 
go to hades, and went and placed my order with 
another agency. If I had been in Mr. Snob's 
place, I should have greeted the caller pleasantly 
and asked him what I could do for him. At 
least, that is the way I treat people when they 
come to my office, and I am about as busy a 
man as there is in town. It pays to treat decent 
people decently, especially if you want to get 
their money. 



Most men offend their callers in the way I 
have mentioned, not because they are busy, 
but because they think it's the swagger way — be- 
cause they- wish to impress callers with their 
swellness ; because they wish to appear wealthy 
and aristocratic and great. But that's just where 
they are mistaken. Brainy men always take 
such conduct as an evidence of dudeishness, of 
senility, of narrow-mindedness. 

None of these New York snobs can ever be so 
great as Abe Lincoln was, and he was always 
ready to meet the humblest granger in the land, 
on equal ground. 

A. G. Ward. 







HE 

CHOICEST 

SMOKING 

TOBACCO 

THAT 

DtfifilENCE CAM 

PRODUCE ORTHATMONEY CAN BUY 

A2oz. trial package postpaid for 25 cents. 
MARBURG BROS. 
3 THE AMERICAN TOBACCO Co, Success** 
BALTIMORE. MD. 



:three IN ONE' 

-iCOMPOUNDH 

1 FOR BICYCLES/GUNS. 
IPREVENTS RUSTXLEANS.LUBRICATES.^ 

'ITSRUST PREVENTIVE QUALITIES ARE MARVELOUS < 
ASA LUBRICANT IT HAS NO EQUAL 
i CLEANING PROPERTIES ARE UNSURPASSED 
NOT EV APORAT E , GUM OR HARDEN. 

, ALL DEALERS SELL IT. ^ 
'V^?,- MANUFACTURED BY rs-vf/' 

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SEND FIVE TWO CENT STAMPS FOR SAMPLE. 



R EC RE A TION. 



IX 




eimf/S) 



E.G. 



19 










ANOTHER RECORD. 

Capt. Jack: Brewer, 

On April 26th, 1895, at Dexter Park, N. Y., 30 yards rise, 50 yards boundary, killed 1 OO 
PIGEONS without a miss, using E. C. Smokeless Powder. Mr. J. A. R. ELLIOTT 
also killed 100 straight in his match with Dr. Carver, using E. C. Powder, which proves 
the wonderful regularity and killing power of E. C. These scores have never been 
equalled with any other powder, and are the highest professional records of the world. 

THE AMERICAN "E. C." POWDER CO., Limited. 

OAKLAND, BERGEN COUNTY, N. J. 



O range "E xtra" P owder. 

PATENTED APRIL 17, 1888. 
THE BEST BLACK POWDER made for general shooting with shotgun or rifle. 
Quick and strong, and burns with perfect combustion. VERY LITTLE SMOKE which 
is almost instantly dissipated. 

Oram Lluhtniit Orane Mini, Oraap Special Powder. 



"TROISDORF," 

Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 



Less Smoke, less Recoil, less Noise, and 
less Residuum than any Powder in use. 
It will not corrode the barrel of the gun. 
It is not explosive except when loaded in a 
shell and fired by a cap. 



LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO. 

New York Office, 29 MURRAY ST. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

St. Louis, Chicago, Cincinnati, Dubuque, Pittsburg, Baltimore, 

Nashville, Denver, Boston, New Orleans. 



l^~Send postal card for illustrated pamphlet, showing sizes of grains of 
Powder. MAILED FREE. 



R EC RE A TION. 



CHARLES DALY 




THREE BARREL GUN. 

FINEST GUN for All Around Use in the Mountains. 



12 Bore Shot Gun, 38-55 Rifle. 



10 

10 



45-70 

32-20 



SCHOVERLING, DALY & GALES, 
302 Broadway, NEW YORK 



A LIGHT THAT IS A LIGHT. 

Chicago, 111. 
Editor Recreation. 

_ I was glad to notice that the police of this 
city made a determined raid a few nights ago on 
the lanternless wheelmen, and the consequences 
were that some 50 or 60 so-called cyclists, were 
arrested and fined for riding without lights. 
This has had a salutary effect, and since these 
arrests it is rarely one sees a wheel in the evening 
without the warning light. Nothing could have 
been more advantageous to the safety and com- 
fort of wheelmen and the public in general, than 
these wholesale arrests and fines, and it is safe 
to say, that any one hereafter may be entirely at 
ease while riding, walking or driving at night. 
The fear of being run down, or into, by some 
idiotic scorcher, who is too mean or careless to 
purchase a lamp, is now reduced to the minimum. 
In my nightly wanderings a-wheel, I notice that 
quite a large proportion of riders use my favorite 
lamp the Search Light, made I think by the 
Bridgeport Brass company. These lamps are 
not simply a signal, but are perfect head 
lights. I know that mine has saved me many 
a hard bump, and perhaps spill, by its friendly 
light. Night riders are here even more plenti- 
ful than those riding by day, which is accounted 
for by the fact that a great number of our wheel- 
men and women are employes, and are unable to 
spare time to be out during the day. To all 



those riding by night, I would say, by all means 
purchase a Search Light, ' ' and the path will be 
made plain unto your feet," or wheel rather. I 
would not part with my luminous nightly guide 
for five times what I gave for it could I not 
secure another. C. H. D. 



The bound volumes of Recreation shall 
occupy a prominent place on the shelves of my 
library. I consider Recreation far ahead of the 
other magazines of its class, and I do not believe 
you could have more able writers than those 
whose names I see in it. The magazine has been 
steadily improving since the first issue. I know 
the sportsmen of the country will all aid you, in 
every way, to make Recreation the greatest 
magazine the United States has ever had. 

John E. Bond. 



To see a copy of Recreation is to want it. 
There is not a dull page in it. Each number is 
better than preceding ones, especially in the 
matter of illustrations. I can not do without 
Recreation, although I am already taking three 
other sportsmen's publications. 

B. C. Hinman. 



Recreation should be in the hands of every 
sportsman in the world, young or old. 

A. E. McKenzie. 



R EC RE A TION. 



XI 



Premo 
Camera 



BEST FOR THE SPORTSMAN. 

Owing to its extreme compactness, portability and ease of manipu- 
lation, the PREMO, is especially adapted for the use of all 
Sportsmen. Just think of a complete 4x5 Camera, measuring 
only 4^x5^x6^ inches, and weighing but two pounds. The 
IDEAL CAMERA for Tourists, Bicyclists, Canoeists, Camping 




Parties, etc. 
SEND FOR 

PREMO PAMPHLET 

Giving Full Particulars. 



Rochester Optical Co., 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




There is a best in every thing, and particularly in loaded shells. There is 
one element that enters into the make-up of cartridges that few shooters give much thought 
to ; this element is brains. Brains cost money wherever found, and brains are an all- 
important factor in a perfectly loaded shell. 

A cartridge machine does not possess brains, consequently machine-loaded shells can 
rarely be depended upon, some shells shooting too strong and some not strong enough. A 
boy does not possess much brains, consequently even hand-loaded shells — loaded by b- 
— often go wrong. 

We pay a higher price for brains, in our loading room, than any other house in the 
country, and always have. Our loaders are experts, and all the loading is done under the 
direct supervision of Mr. Frank Lawrence, who is probably the most expert shell loader in 
the country. 

Formerly our net price to dealers and clubs, for our cheapest shells, was $25, but in order 
to very largely increase our sales in this department, we have reduced the price to $19.40. 

Our shells at this price are not to be confounded for a moment with other $2.00 shells, 
loaded carelessly by boys, and put back in the boxes the empty shells came in. 

Squires' Hand-Loaded Shells are all packed either 25 in an elegantly lithographed box, 
or 100 in a handsome wooden box, or will be packed in japanned tin carrying cases at $2.00 
a 1 ,000 extra. 

We want you to try a sample hundred or so, or if you are a dealer, a sample thousand 
or so. We want you to send for them to-day, this very hour, this minute, in fact, while it 
is fresh in your mind. Remember, that besides powder and shot and wads, we give you 
brains, and brains are scarce. 

HENRY C. SQUIRES & SON, 20 Cortlandt Street, New York. 



X1L 



RECREA TION. 




the >CUSK£T or ELijAH HILUKCTH 4 ofDracuT,MASS. 



BROWN BESS. 

Chicago, 111. 
Editor Recreation. 

The statue of the minute-men on Concord, 
Mass., battle ground, bears the following 
inscription : 

" By the rude bridge that 

Arched the flood, 
Their flag to April's • 

Breeze unfurled, 
Here once the embattled 

Farmers stood, 
And fired the shot heard 

Round the world." 

The great great grandfather of the writer, 
Private Elijah Hiidreth, of Dracut, — now 
Lowell, Mass. — carried this flint lock musket and 
powder horn, April 19, 1775. 

The stone shown in the cut marks the spot 
where the minute men formed to confront the 
British troops. The independence of Massa- 
chusetts Bay Colony was practically achieved, 
April 19, 1775, though it waited to be declared, 
with that of her sister states, on the 4th of July, 
1776. 

The Revolutionary war began with a shot from 
"Brown Bess," at Concord, Lexington. Our 
second war with England, 1812-15, ended witha 
shot from this flint look over at Dartmoor prison. 

Between the introduction of the flint lock in 
1630 and the percussion lock in 1839, there was 
not any improvement made in the arm. 

It was used when Charles II. of England was 
born . Cromwell fought the Royalists with it at 
Naseby, in 1645. When the newly created 
colonists of Massachusetts Bay, in New England, 
befriended Massasoit, sachem of the Wampano- 
ags, and when, forty-five years later, or in 1675, 
they fought and killed his son, Philip, of Mount 
Hope, the Colonists were armed with the flint 
lock musket. The Dutch used it against the 
Mohawks in 1640, and good Peter Stuyvesant 
defeated the Algonquins with it in New 
Netherland in 1665. During King William's 
war, 1689, Queen Anne's war, 1701, and 
King George's war following, Brown 
Bess figured in the hands of Massa- 
chusetts troops under Sir William Phipps, at 



Port Royal. The flint lock was the arm of reli- 
ance during the wars of the Spanish Succession 
and of the Austrian Succession. Nova Scotia 
and Cape Breton were added to the English Do- 
main. Sir William Pepperell's followers used the 
flint lock. Governor Oglethorpe fought the 
Spaniards in Georgia with it in 1739. The 
French used it against the Iroquois and the out- 
break of the French and Indian war in 1754 
found the flint lock on both sides, just as in 1835, 
our Black Hawk war against the Sacs, Foxes, Win- 
nebagos, Seminoles and Cherokees did. Marl- 
borough used Brown Bess at Blenheim, in 
1704. Wellington used it at Waterloo in 1815, 
and Generals Scott and Gaines used it during 
Andrew Jackson's presidency. 

It is remarkable that of the more modern battles 
of Europe in which great numbers of men have 
been engaged, — battles in which were used rifled 
cannon and small arms, — none afforded greatly 
less percentages of casualties than those of earlier 
battles in which smooth-bore cannon and muskets 
were the sole weapons of fire. 

Old Brown Bess and the smooth-bore guns 
inflicted proportionately more injury to life and 
limb than occurred in the battles later in the cen- 
tury, with all the appliances of improved arma- 

ments - Philip Reade, 

Captain, U. S. A. 



New Glasgow, N. S. 
Editor Recreation. 

The breeding of English pheasants has been 
quite a success. Strange to say these birds, 
which have been cast into our forests, have 
braved the frosts and snows of this northern 
latitude, successfully raised their young, and 
provided for themselves as though they were 
indigenous to the country. 

O. A. Pritchard. 



Editor Recreation. 

By the test of merit Recreation deserves to 
succeed. I will warmly advise all my friends, 
who are interested in gun and rod, to subscribe 
for the cleanest, brightest and most readable 
magazine published. 

John Borland. 



RECREA TION. 



xiu 



HAVE YOU SEEN 



THE "DAVENPORT 77 '92 MODEL SHOT GUN 





Detachable Barrel, FinelylFinished, Light Weight. 

Has frame either nickel or case hardened, sliding breech block, rebounding lock, case-hardened drop forged steel 
parts, fine steel barrels, finely checkered walnut stock and fore end. 

manufactured by THE W. H, DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO., no™,™, conn 
Ejector Guns ^^A GOOD MEWS FOR SPORTSMEN. 

nO longer cl t^ llllilWP P^ Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 

luXUrV _-<s^^>< lH^^^^ within the reach of every sportsman. 

Our New Ejector Movement 
Has only two pieces: One in the 
Hammer, One in 
f^^^^^P ^^ ^--m the Frame. 

f ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^MffM^^ " We have decided to meet 

the demand for medium price 
Ejectors, and are now pre- 
pared to accept orders for 

TENS OF THOUSANDS IN USE. ^ 1^3 a11 ^ rades of our hammerless 

Send for Catalogue. ^I^at^ ^^ guns fitted with Ejectors. 

LEFEVER ARMS CO., - - Syracuse, N. Y. 

[Mention Recreation.] 

Date, 1895. 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of BECRE AT ION, 216 William St., New York. 

Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send mc RECREATION 
for one year. 

Name 

No Street, P.O. 

County, State, 

Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS FILL OUT AND SEND IN. 




XIV 



RECREATION. 



E. I. DUPONT de NEMOURS & CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Smok eless P owder. 

The Safest, Strongest, Quickest and Cleanest Nitro Powder in the world. 
Less Smoke than any other Nitro. Will not Pit or Rust the barrels. 

High Velocity with Moderate Pressure. Close and Even Pattern, with 
Great Penetration. The Nitro for which Sportsmen have been waiting. 

SEND TO US FOR PRICE-LIST WITH DIRECTIONS FOR LOADING. 

OR TO 



E. S. RICE, 62 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago. 
WM. McBLAIR, - 509 North Third Street, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
R. S. WADDELL, - 45 West Second Street, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
FRED. J. WADDELL, Cor. 8th & Chestnut Sts., 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
L. C. THORNHILL, - 54 Gravier Street, 

New Orleans, La. 

D. W. C, BIDWELL & CO., ' - 143 Water St., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



CLINTON BIDWELL, - 14 West Swan St., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
SHOEMAKER & VOUTE, 126 South Del. Ave. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. P. COLLINS, - 22 South Calvert Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 
ARTHUR HYNDMAN, - - 32 Pine Street, 

New York. 
GEO. E. SMITH & CO., - 7 Central Wharf, 

Boston, Mass. 

S. C. MADDEN, - 1310 Eighteenth Street* 

Denver, Col. 



C. A. HAIGHT, 226 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



"A magnificent work, equal to 'Audubon's Birds,' 
giving all the birds of North America, with elaborate 
plates in natural colors, accompanied by descriptions." 
— Education, Boston. 

"A wonderful work.''— Good Citizen. 

"A great work." — National Teacher. 

STUDER'S POPULAR ORNITHOLOGY. 



e 



The Birds oi 
North America 



DRAWN AND COLORED FROM LIFE. 

Includes all our species, artistically reproduced in all 
their shades of color, true to natural plumage and bo- 
tanical surroundings ; with a copious text embracing 
the observations made by the most eminent writers on 
Ornithology. The work is a superb imperial quarto, 
and is sold at net prices as follows : 

In fine half bindings, $40 ; in full, $45. 

Russia, seal or morocco, gold edges. 

.» 
ISSUED under the auspices of 

The Natural Science Association of America, 

114 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK. 



M. R. PERKINS, 

SHERIDAN, WYOMING, 

Keeps a full and complete line of 

Guns, Cartridges, 

FISHING TACKLE, 

TENTS, 

Saddles, Harness, Horse Clothing, 

and everything in the line of 

SPORTSMEN'S SUPPLIES. 

Tourists and Sportsmen visiting the Yellowstone 
Park, or the Great Hunting Grounds of Wyoming, can 
find here everything needed, in the way of an outfit, 
at eastern prices with freight added. 



All Kinds of Large and Small Game. 
Excellent Mountain Trout Fishing. 



Guides, Teams, Saddle and Pack Animals 
Furnished. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED./] 



R EC RE A TION. 



xv 



'1 



JAMES FULLERTON, 

Practical Mountaineer and Guide, 

TEN SLEEP, WYOMING, 



FOR SALE. 






Elk, Sheep, Deer, Bear, Lions, 
Antelope, Grouse and Trout, 

All within 15 miles of my ranch. 

Would accommodate a few boarders at our 
ranch, on No Wood river, at the foot of the 
Big Horn Mountains. 

My wife is an expert in the cooking of game 
and fish, and we have plenty of garden truck, 
milk, butter, eggs, and wild fruits in season. 
GRAND CLIMATE. SUPERB SCENERY. 

Correspondence solicited. 

Red Irish Setter, Nat Elcho. 
(Nat Glencho by Bessie 
Gauge.) Registered. 2^ 
years old. Prize winner. Perfect coat, form and 
feather, very dark color, no white. Splendid nose. 
Obedient and tractable. Fast, wide ranger. Nat is 
as perfect a specimen as is in the Northwest. He has 
no faults and is well worth $200.00. Will sell him for 
$35.00 if taken at once. 

J. C. NATTRASS, 

New Whatcom, Wash. 

Editor Recreation . Philadelphia, Pa. 

It has been my good fortune to take brook 
trout from the cold streams that wind their way 
among the Berkshire hills, and from the famous 
streams of Vermont and Maine. I have enjoyed 
the pleasures of camp life in northern Maine ; 
taken salmon and trout from the waters of Nova 
Scotia, and have dropped a bull moose in the 
Medischak country, back of Pubulco, Nova 
Scotia ; yet of all my pleasures, the one I hold 
dearest is that which I experienced 14 years ago, 
when, as a school boy, I tramped the Berkshire 
hills with my long bow, and dropped a rabbit or 
a bird at 50 yards. 

There is no sport so exhilarating, so perfect, 
so entrancing. Make your own bow, put on horn 
tips, worked out with your own hands, from 
horns obtained at the nearest slaughter house ; 
split out, finish and tip your own arrows. Scour 
the country for the left wings of turkeys, slain 
for market by the near-by farmer, and then, sit- 
ting by your open fire at home, feather your own 
arrows, giving them just the right " twist." 
Then go forth, armed with weapons, entirely the 
product of your own skill, and try to overcome 
the instinct and woodcraft of the dumb creatures 
we call game. 

As you return homeward, laden with tro- 
phies of the chase, how you can rejoice over the 
poor fellow who, with high priced gun or rifle, 
has a bag to beat yours. His represents 
mechanical skill in manufacture. Yours repre- 
sents the results of your own patient effort, in 
constructing your tools and getting your game. 

All glory to archery ! Every true sportsman 
would love it if he knew its charms. 

Why can't it be revived ? Won't you take it 
up ? Write an article, and ask those interested 
to answer through Recreation. Let's have a 
National Archery League. It's true sport; takes 
skill and nerve. I could not hit a barn now, but 
you can depend on me to catch on if a chance is 
offered to form a club. There is no sport like it. 
A. H. Chadbourne. 



DRY MATCHES! 

IN THE 

Perfection Water -Proof 
Matchbox. 




Indispensable to sportsmen who hunt, fish tran 
camp, or sail. ' a ^' 

Size, 2% inches long, % inch diameter, beautifully 
nickeled or silver plated. Price 50 cents and $1, post- 
age prepaid. Order at once. 

You can fill this box with matches, lay it in water 
overnight and the next morning they will light as if 
they had been kept in a powder magazine. 

J. R. PAINTER, 

Manufacturer and Importer of Musical 
Boxes, Etc. 

1229 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 




LYMAN'S RIFLE SIGHTS. 

Send for 96 Page Catalogue of 

Sights and Fine Shooting Rifles. 

WILLIAM LYMAN, 

Middlefield, Conn. 



The Ideal Boot and Shoe for Still Hunting. 

ABSOLUTELY NOISELESS. 

Uppers made of best quality heavy Horse Hide, 
tanned and finished same as Buck or Moose leather • 
soft as a glove, tough enough to stand the wear and 
tear of briars and brush ; no exposure to repeated wet- 
tings will ever harden. By a peculiar and new process 
the upper is rendered entirely waterproof. The experi- 
ence and suggestions of 
many critical and intelli- 
gent hunters combined, has 
resulted in the production 
of this, 

The Ideal Hunter's Shoe. 

The bottom is wide, made 
up of two electric soles, 
rubber cemented together, 
half an inch thick. 

Impervious to Wet. 
Will not glaze and slip. 
Electric sole is a new pro- 
cess tanned Cow Hide, 
flexible and easy as a moccasin, as substantial u 1 
Stoga Boot, and exceedinly light weight : all the 
parts are put together in workmanlike manner, hand- 
stitched, perfect in every detail, neat in appearance, 
suitable for any occupation requiring absolute comfort 
in tramping or exposure. 

The Lace Shoe is 10 inches high, eyelets and studs, 
bellows tongue lined throughout with rubber cloth, 
porous, will not sweat. 

The Boot is 18 inches high, laced instep, and laced 
at top outside to tighten to the leg. 

Will send this IDEAL ZACE SHOE to any 
address by express prepaid, on receipt of $7.50. The 
IDEJLJL BOOT on receipt of $10. If made to meas- 
ure, will deliver in 10 days. 

First class sporting goods houses are invited to send 
for samples and terms. 

M, A. SMITH. Manufacturer of Shoe Specialties. Gym- 
nasium & Sporting Shoes, 25-27 N. 13th St. Phila., Pa. 




xvi RECREATION. 



Sulphite Soda 

PUREST MADE ON EARTH I 
U rurms . — walpole hypo i 

Large Crystals, WELL ' OUR SULPH,TE ,s JUST AS ""*' 

Small Crystals (New Process), 
sample. - five cents Powdered (Anhydrous), 

(stamps) 

Sometimes called Granular. 

—Walpole Chemical Co.,— 



(Business founded 1870.) 

WALPOLE, 1ASS. 

v_ y 

G. GENNERT, 24 EAST 13th STREET, NEW YORK, 

EASTERN AND SOUTHERN TRADE AGENTS. 



TAXIDERMIST'S SUPPLIES. 

ARTIFICIAL GLASS EYES 

For Stuffed Birds and Animals. 

Oologist's and Entomologist's Supplies. 

Send 2c. stamp for Taxidermist's Catalogue to 

FRED. KAEMPFER, Taxidermist, 

217 Madison St,, Chicago, 111. 

All specimens of natural history prepared and 
mounted true to nature in the best style <_f art and 
at reasonable prices. 



HENRY MILWARD & SONS, 

FisH Hoo^s, 

Hooks on Gut, Gut Leaders, Cork Floats, Etc. 

WE HAVE SECURED SOLE RIGHTS AND ENTIRE CONTROL OF THE 

"INIMITABLE" TROUT AND BASS FLIES. 

These Flies have the best imitation of the natural wings ever offered. 
Wings are waterproof, buoyant, flexible, very tenacious and not affected by the solar rays. 

If your Local Dealer has not these Flies seud for Sample Dozen. 

Inimitable Trout Flies, $i.oo per doz. Inimitable May Flies, $1.25 doz. Inimitable Bass Flies, $1.50 doz. 

If not fully to your satisfaction money will be refunded on receipt of returned goods. 

NO CATALOGUE. LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE. 

C. B. FITZ MA URICE, 

297 Broadway, New York. United States Representative. 





RECREATION. 



XVll 



fl HATS it 



They're all talking about it, 

and they say it's a dandy. 
THE "IDEAL" 

LOADING MACHINE 

Is the only one that will handle all kinds of powder correctly. 
ideal, HAND book, No. 5, just out. 80 pages of solid in- 
formation on loading shells, etc. Stamps for postage acceptable. 
IDEAL MFG. CO., Drawer 86 New Haven, Conn., U.S. A. 




LOOK 

AT THE 

PRICE. 



[Mention Recreation.] 



BOOKS BY G. 0. SHIELDS. (COQUINA.) 






¥1 b& 



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b o -S 

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c*2 o 

' 5 § S 
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C/5 
° £ 

ex 2 



THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA. 

Its Habits, Habitat, Haunts, and Characteristics. How, When and 
Where to Hunt it. 

Svo, 600 Pages, 80 Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5.00. 
Fall Morocco, $6.50. 



CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES. 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur Photography, Hunting 

and Fishing, with Special Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, 

the Buffalo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 

Deer ; also on Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; on a 

Montana Roundup ; Life among the Cowboys, 

etc. 

12 mo, 300 Pages, 75 Illustrations. Cloth, $2 ; Half Morocco, $3. 

AMERICAN GAME FISHES. 

How, When and Where to Angle for Them. 
8vo, 400 Pages, 50 Illustrations. Cloth, $2.50 ; Half Morocco, $4.00. 



HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST. 

(RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES.) 

Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and Stream. 
12mo Cloth. Over 300 Pages, Illustrated. Price, 75 Cents. 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG. 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics, Utility, Breeding, 

Training, Diseases, and Kennel Management of 

all Breeds of Dogs. 

8to, 650 Pages, 100 Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5 ; 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS. 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sportsmen. 

12mo, 200 Pages, 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 



THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE. 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with the Nez Perce Indians 
in the Big Hole Basin, Montana, August 9, 1877. 

12mo. 150 Pages, Profusely Illustrated. Cloth, $1. 



These books will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the 
author. 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

216 William Street, New York. 



V 

A 

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XV111 



RECREATION. 



Stock part detached 
from barrel. 




Action Open, ejecting 
Shell. 



it 



THE"BURGESS" GUN 

12 ga. Repeating Shot-Gun. 

Latest, Quickest, Simplest, Safest. 

The ideal action. Movement in direct line between 
points of support. Double hits in 1-8 second ; three hits 
in one second ; six hits in less than three seconds. 

Address for circulars, 

BURGESS GUN CO., Buffalo, N. Y, 

IRA DODG-E, 
MOUNTAINEER AND GUIDE, 

Collector of Wild Animals, 
CORA, WYOMING. 

Complete Transportation Outfits Furnished. 

Hunting Parties and National Park Excursionists. 

Correspondence solicited. 

"DIETZ" _ f 

TUBULAR HUNTING LAMP. 

PATENTED. 

Looks like a locomotive head-light. 

It will not blow nor jar out. 

The hood over the front works perfectly and with- 
out noise. When the hood is down no light escapes. 

It will throw a powerful light 200 feet. 

It burns kerosene oil, and will burn ten-hours with- 
out re-filling. 

11 INCHES HIGH. 6 INCHES IN DIAMETER. WEIGHT 2 1-2 LBS. 

It is compact and handsome. Has a bail and can 
be used as a hand and wall lantern in camp. Gives a 
brilliant light, and is absolutely safe. 

Price $4.00. 

Will be sent by mail or express, prepaid, anywhere 
in the United States or Canada, on receipt of price and 
50 cents for postage or expressage. 

R. E. DIETZ CO., 60 LA'IGHT ST, NEW YORK. 



a 



vfe. 



DPIWIBii 



rfisHifisy 



—^TACKLET 
MANCHESTERWT) 

For Prices on the Best and Most 
Comfortable 

SLEEPING BAG 

ever made, write or call on 

S. HEMENWAY & SON, 

60 South St., New York City. 



Do You Know? 

that the 

HANNAFORD 

VENTILATED RUBBER BOOTS 

are ■worn at all seasons with 




Absolute Comfort. 

NO SWEATING. 

Ask your dealer for them, 
or send for catalogue. 

HANNAFORD 
VENTILATED 1 
BOOT CO., 79 MILK ST,, BOSTON. 

NELSON YARNALL, 
HUNTER AND GUIDE, 

DUBOIS, WYOMING. 

Am perfectly familiar with all the mountain country 
to the south and east of Yellowstone National Park. 
Am prepared to furnish complete outfits, and conduct 
hunting parties in first-class style. Best of references 
from both military and civil parties. 

FROM THE MAINE WOODS. 

Curritunk, Me. 
Editor Recreation. 

I have just returned here from Parlin pond, 
where I have been the past ten days, guiding 
Messrs. W. Y. Wadleigh and A. F. Wheaton, of 
Boston. 

On Saturday, June ist, we went in to Grace 
pond, five miles from Parlin pond, and in three 
days fishing they caught 520 trout, all with the 
fly. Most of these fish were returned to the 
water. We also saw, in that time, 17 deer, some 
of which were so tame that we rowed within 50 
feet of them. Tuesday we returned to Parlin 
pond. 

Wednesday we went in to Long pond, three 
miles from Parlin pond, where we caught 180 
trout. We also fished part of one day at Parlin 
pond, catching 40 trout, making in all 740. The 
largest trout taken in Parlin pond, so far this 
spring, weighed 2}4 pounds. 

There are not many sportsmen at Parlin pond, 
at present, as the rush to that place does not 
begin until the first of July. 

Mr. Alex Cox and frigid, of Skowhegan, Me., 
were in to Ellis p^id*ast week fishing; they 
brought out a fine lot of trout, some of them 
weighing three pounds each. 

Ellis pond is 10 miles from The Forks, reached 
by a good wagon road. Parties visiting Pleasant 
pond this spring report good fishing. Deer seem 
to be more numerous than ever this summer. 
One evening, while at Parlin pond, we counted 
seven in the field, in front of the hotel. They 
were so tame, that some of the guests walked to 
within 100 feet of them. 

Geo. C. Jones, Guide. 



Nell. — I wouldn't be in your shoes for anything. 
Belle (sweetly). — You couldn't get into them, 
my dear. — Somerville {Mass?) Journal. 



RECREATION. 



xix 



SPORTSMEN'S 



Camping and Fishing 

TENTS. 

YACHT AND CANOE SAILS. 

FLAGS AND BURGEES, 

Canvas Covers, and Camp Furniture 
of every description. 



8. HEMMENWAY & SON 



60 South St., 



NEW YORK CITY. 



Send 5-cent stamp for our Tent and Flag Catalogue. 

Scovill's 

NEW WATERBDRY 

Camera. 

Containing (new) safety shutter, 
view finder, (new) focusing ad- 
justment, three (3) double plate 
holders. Leather covered. All 
for $15. 

4x5 Size. 

Send for complete descriptive circular to 

Scovill & Adams Co., . 
423 Broome Street, New York. 



FOR SALE. 



New $2.25 Vertical 
Fixing Box, hard 
rubber, holds two dozen plates ; also an 
Anthony Drop Shutter, good as new. 
Will take $2.50 for same. 

Paul A. Ulrich, Springfield, 111. 



wiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiini 




Gallons for 251 



Not of the preparations of coloring 
matter and essential oils so often 
sold under the name of rootbeer, 
but of the purest, most delicious, 
health-giving beverage possible to 
produce. One gallon or Hires' is 
worth ten of the counterfeit kind. 
Suppose an imitation extract costs 
five cents less than the genuine 
Hires; the same amount of sugar 
and trouble is required; you save 
one cent a gallon, and— get an un- 
healthful imitation in the end. Ask 



for HIRES and get it. 

IHIRESi 

I Rootbeer | 

z THE CHAS. E. HIRES CO., Philadelphia. 

sviiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuii 

POCO 

The smallest and most complete 4x5 Camera made. 
ALL ADJUSTMENTS. 




(D 

O 



ROCHESTER CAMERA MFG. 

21 Aqueduct Sq., ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



CO., 



LIVE WHITE HARES 

(Lapus Americanua) 
For Sale at $ 1 .50 a Pair. 

Delivered to express office here, properly fed and crated 
for shipping. 

J. G. RICH, BETHEL, MAINE. 

Large lots at special prices. 

BIRDS 

Are described in the most interesting manner and beau- 
tifully illustrated in the 

IOWA ORNITHOLOGIST. 

The only illustrated quarterly magazine in the V 
sippi Valley devoted to the study of birds. 
Subscription, 40 cents a year. Sample copy, 10 cents. 
DAVID L. SAVAGE, Editor, Salem, Iowa. 



XX 



RECREATION. 



THE ONLY PERFECT FISHING LINE 



IS THE 



— Natchaug— 
Braided Silk Line. 



Made from the choicest stock braided 1 6- strand three-cord silk. They will outwear 
three ordinary lines. Spool perfectly when in use. 

Never flatten or become water soaked. 

THE NATCHAUG WATERPROOF BAIT AND FLY LINES 

Will float on the water. The finish cannot be broken. Those who have used them will have no 
others. Send four cents for samples and prices and pamphlet containing our awards of prizes for 
last season. FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS. Manufactured by 



THE NATCHAUG SILK CO., Willimantic, Conn. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 213-215 FIFTH AVENUE. 



Mr. J. R. Painter, 1229 Chestnut street, 
Philadelphia, has done a marked service to 
sportsmen by making and putting on the market 
an absolutely waterproof match box. It is made 
of brass tubing and has a cover that screws on, 
the shoulder resting on a pad of soft rubber. I 
filled one of these boxes with matches, placed it 
in water over night. In the morning I lit the 
matches and they burned as though they had 
never been near water. 

Some years ago I wanted a water proof match 
box, and being unable to find one in the market, 
went to a surgical instrument maker and had 
him make me one, to order. Every man who 
has ever had to sleep in the dark, wet woods, for 
want of a dry match, will thank Mr. Painter for 
enabling him to provide against such a calamity 
in future. Send to him for a descriptive circular 
and price list. ■ 

The Walpole Dye and Chemical Com- 
pany, Walpole, Mass., makes a line of chem- 
icals that are in great demand among photogra- 
phers. Many who order them from wholesale 
dealers claim that they can not get them, but 
that inferior goods are substituted. Photogra- 
phers who are anxious to have the purest and 
best drugs in the market should order direct 
from the Walpole Company. 

The Bridgeport Gun Implement Company is 
sending out a handsome new catalogue of its 
gun and bicycle sundries. It illustrates many 
new implements, such as hand loading outfits, 
new rapid loaders, for nitro and black powders ; 
new cleaning sets, etc. Send for a copy. Men- 
tion Recreation. 



$ They All Like It. | 

Jj The Ladies Like It. ^ 

<| So Do the Men. <| 

£ Even Children Enjoy It. 




THE LAYMAN PNEUMATIC BOAT. 




A Perfect 

Invention 

for Fishing 

& Hunting. 

Absolutely 
Safe. 



k For sale by H.D. LAYMAN, 853 Broadway.N.Y, £ 

& Call and place your order in time to be filled £ 

#►, this season. (Lady in attendance.) Xj 



RECREA TION. 



xxi 



Y ALLEY, 
PLAIN 
and 
PEAK. 



An art book of North- 
western scenes, from photo- 
graphs, over 100 views, with 
descriptive matter, elegantly 
printed, sent with other 
publications of much interest to investors and 
nomeseekers, for ten cents in postage. This 
book contains more useful and interesting 
matter and artistic beauty than art publica- 
tions often selling for a dollar or more. Ad- 
dress F. I. Whitney, G. P. and T. A., Great 
Northern Railway, St. Paul, Minn. 

{Mention this Paper.) 15-A. 




Send for Hunting and Fishing Bulletins. 




ATLAS 



NORTHWEST. 



A N Contains COMPLETE 

maps of the U. S., Min- 
nesota, the two Dakotas, 
Montana, Idaho and 
Washington, showing post 
offices to June 1st, 1894, 
with every geographical and topographical 
feature brought down to date, and printed in 
the highest style of the map maker's art In- 
teresting descriptive, historical and statistical 
information appears with each map. Send 15 
cents for postage to F. I. Whitney, G. P. & 
T. A., Gt. Northern Railway, St. Paul, Minn. 
{Mention this Paper.') 15-B 



A Straight Line,' 



A Quick Line, 

A Through Line, 
A Popular Line 

To all points in New York State. 

THE MODERN WEST SHORE RAILROAD. 



->» 



=7" 



ELEGANT SLEEPING CARS. 



Five Fast Trains to the V/est. 



Have you ever ridden on the National Express, the new limited 
train to Buffalo? It leaves New York at 7.30 p. m., and arrives 
there early next morning. 

C. E. LAMBERT, G. P. A., New York. 



xxu 



RECREATION 



FOREHAND APLIS/IS OO.'S 



LATEST MODEL 



Ejector and Non-Ejector Hammerless Double Gun, 




We challenge competition in Beauty, Workmanship, Simplicity of Mechanism, Shooting 
Qualities and Price. We target all of our guns with nitro powder. 

For Catalogue, address FOREHAND ARMS CO., Worcester, Mass. 

The Hollenbeck Hammerless Gun. 

The Simplest, Strongest, and Most Durable Gun Made. 




No. i. As per cut, best twist barrels. List price, $40. 
No. o. Same as above, but not engraved. List price, $35. 

Bored Especially for Nitro Powder and Fully Guaranteed when Using Same, 

We make the 12 ga. from 6% lbs. up, and 10 ga. from 7 lbs. up, 

SYRACUSE ARMS CO., Syracuse, n.y, 

WRITE FOR CIRCULAR OF PRICES TO 

HERMAN BOKER & CO., 101 Duane St., New York, Sole Agents. 

Also wholesale Agents for Spencer Guns. See page xxiii. 



RECREA TION. xxiii 



'To THE Pleasure Resorts 



OF 



TEXAS AND GULF OF MEXICO. 



take \S f I w mm i via 

• • • 




CHICAGO, 
KANSAS CITY, 
or ST. LOUIS, 




WAGNER BUFFET SLEEPERS. 
FREE "KATY" CHAIR CARS. 

For further information, address : 

W. S. ST. GEORGE, General Eastern Agent, 
409 Broadway, New York. 



pencer Repeating M>hot Grun. 

BEST IN THE WORLD. SIX SHOTS IN THREE SECONDS 




Twist Steel Barrel Case Hardened System. 



Linxoln, Neb., May 21, 1892. 
Dear Sir : — I have used a Spencer Repeating Shot Gun for eight years. I have fired many 
thousands of shots with it, and it is apparently in as good condition to-day as it was when I pur- 
chased it. Several years ago a friend of mine, now residing in this city, stood by my side and saw 
me kill six prairie chickens out of a covey that arose simultaneously, shooting each bird separately. 
For any kind of shooting from jack snipe to geese, I prefer the Spencer to any gun I have ever used. 

Yours very truly, J. E. HOUTZ. 



HERMANN BOKER & CO., 101-103 Duane St., N. Y.. Wholesale Agts. 



,, 1V1 ivu i/uuuv UUJ 
SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR. 

Also Wholesale Agents for Hollenbeck Guns. See page xxii. 



Mention Recreation. 



: 



XXIV 



RECREA TION. 



BEFORE DECIDING ON 

THE LOCALITY FOR YOUR 



S ummer vacation 



% QUEBEC & LAKE ST JOHN RAILWAY 




You will find it to your interest to make inquiries about the 

QUEBEC AND 
LAKE ST. JOHN 
RAILWAY, 

The New Route to the Far-Famed Saguenay, and the 
ONLY RAIL LINE to the delightful summer resorts and 
fishing grounds north of Quebec, and to Lake St. John 

and Chicoutimi, through the 

CANADIAN ADIRONDACKS. 

Trains connect at Chicoutimi with Saguenay steamers for 
TADOUSSAC, CACOUNA, MURRAY BAY and QUEBEC. 

A round trip unequalled in America, through matchless 
forest, mountain, river and lake scenery, down the majestic 
Saguenay by daylight and back to the Fortress City. 

Touching at all the Beautiful Seaside Resorts 

on the Lower St. Lawrence, with their chain of commodious hotels. 
Hotel Roberval, Lake St. John, has first-class accommodations for 300 
guests, and is run in connection with the Island House, at Grand 
Discharge, of Lake St. John, the centre of the Ouananiche Fishing 
Grounds. 

PARLOR AND SLEEPING CARS. 

MAGNIFICENT SCENERY. BEAUTIFUL CLIMATE. 

Apply to the ticket agents of all principal cities. 

A beautifully illustrated Guide Book free on application. 



ALEX. HARDY, gen. pass. Agt., Quebec, can 



J. G. SCOTT, SEC. &. MANAGER. 



AN 



ILLUMINATOR 



Not Simply a 
Signal. 



IT BURNS 

KEROSENE. 



IT BURNS 

10 HOURS 




Bridgeport Brass Go. _ 

19 3RJS. Y - *S WI131 it is named. 



The Silver Hook, a beautiful etching, from 
the scene printed on front cover of May Recre- 
ation, is now ready for delivery. Size of picture 
16 x 20 ; printed on paper 30 x 40 ; price $8. 
For sale by the artist, Mr. W. M. Cary, 181 W. 
135th street, New York city. 



Mr. James F. Edge, president of the Asbury 
Park Gun Club, writes to Messrs. G. W. Cole & 
Co., in Broadway, New York: 

"The members of the Asbury Park Gun 
Club are using your ' 3 in 1 ' compound for guns, 
and they cheerfully recommend it to all sportsmen, 
as a rust preventive, cleaner and lubricator." 



A friend sent me a copy of Recreation, which 
I have read with great pleasure. Here is my 
dollar. A man who has neither hunted nor fished 
knows little of nature ; and when he reaches the 
happy hunting grounds, in the sweet bye and 
bye, he will be a very ordinary saint. 

John McLean, M. D. 



Gillback. — What kind of paper have you on 
your walls? 

Bilter. — Cartridge. 

Gillback. — Aren't you afraid it will go off? 

Bilter. — No ; it's blank. 

— N. V. World. 



RECREATION. 



XXV 



FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF. 




Mosler Patent Improved 
Office Safe. 



OUR HOUSE SAFES . . . 

Finished handsomely in cabinet design. 
Are sold at moderate prices. They may 
be ordered in imitation of any wood to 
harmonize with furniture and fixtures. 



OUR BUSINESS SAFES . . . 

Fire and burglar-proof, meet every 
requirement. 




Mosler Patent Improved 
House Safe. 



-+-•-*- 



MOSLER SAFE CO. 

305 Bpoadrxtay, Conner* Duane Street, 



Telephone, 1086 Franklin. 



NEW YORK. 



Petoskey, Mich. 

Editor Recreation: 

Four months ago we 
ordered two copies of 
Recreation, as a sam- 
ple. The next month 
we ordered five copies, 
and the next month ten. 
This month we ordered 
twenty copies and since 
they came have sent for 
five more. It has had 
the largest run of any 
periodical we ever had 
on our counter. 

COBURN & HARNER, 

News Agents. 



A BEVERAGE FOR WHEELMEN. 

Next to being lost at sea there is nothing that 
brings on the pangs of thirst quicker than bicycle 
riding. The hot sun and the constant inhalation 
of dust quickly parches the throat and makes the 
biker long for the next stop for refreshments. 
The wise rider avoids ice water, well knowing its 
danger. Alcoholic beverages are likewise 
tabooed because of their heating propensities, 
and there is little satisfaction in wishy-washy 
stuff sold under the broad classification of " soft 
drinks." A well known wheelman in speaking 
of this, said : 

" What to drink is no easy problem to a man 
on a long, hot run. The only drink I know 
really fit for a bicyle rider is Hires' Rootbeer, 
carbonated. There are but few places now at 
which it cannot be had, and I tell you it braces 
one right up, seems to go right down to the bot- 
tom of your pedal workers. It is cooling and re- 
freshing, quickly lowering your temperature and 
fully satisfying your thirst. I tell you there's 
nothing like it, and I've sworn off all other drinks 
when on the road." Hires' Rootbeer, carbonate'!, 
is made from the famous Hires' Rootbeer extract 
by the same formula, without adulteration of any 
kind. Besides being delicious, it possesses many 
medicinal qualities, making it as popular with 
wheelmen and pedestrians as the good home- 
made Hires' Rootbeer is with the folks at home. 



I have just finished reading the last number of 
Recreation and am delighted with it. It<. 
excellent reading matterand beautiful illustrations 
commend it to all sportsmen. 

Edward P. Kremer, D. D. S. 



XXVI 



RECREA TION. 



BREVITY I5TME SOULOF WIT 



Ll4HT,STR0N(q &SPEEDY. 

Buffalo Wheel Co. .Buffalo, N-.Y,- 



41 =5 



^ ""C 



=% 




Send 5c to pay postage 
on 1895 

Illustrated 
Catalogue of 
Angling Goods. 



The 
"Chubb' 
Trade 
Mark. c 




Fishing Rods and Fine Fishing Tackle. 

Address, T. H. CHUBB ROD CO., 

Please Mention Recreation. POST MILLS, VT. 



Waterloo, la. 
I have read your writings in years past with 
much pleasure, and your varied experience in 
matters relating to field sports amply fits you for 
your latest enterprise. 

John C. Hartman, 
Sec. and Treas. Hartman Publishing Co. 



" WEBSTER'S 

INTERNA TIONAL 



New from 
Cover to Cover. 




dictionary : 

Successor of the 
"Unabridged." 

A Dictionary of 

English, 

Geography, 

Biography, 

Fiction, Etc. 

Standard of the IT. S. 
Gov't Printing Office.the \ 
U.S. Supreme Court and » 
of nearly all the School- 
books. 



Hon.D. J. Brewer,| 

Justice of the U. S. 
Supreme Court, writes : J 
I commend it to all as< 
the one great standard authority. 

Send for free pamphlet containing specimen pages. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, 

Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 

S3- Do not buy reprints of ancient editions. 



Recreation is a gem among the magazines — 
far superior to most sportsmen's periodicals. 
I am familiar with Coquina and know him to be 
as expert with the pen as with rod and gun. 
The fact that he is at the head of Recreation 
insures its readers the best entertainment possible. 

Nat. D. Watktns. 



Enclosed please find $1.00 for Recreation 
It is just the kind of a paper I like to read. The 
articles are not prosy nor verbose, but snappy and 
full of meat. 

Frank West. 



I have another subscriber for your interesting 
and instructive paper. I will endeavor to get 
you more, which I am sure will be an easy 
matter with such an ideal publication. Enclosed 
find one dollar. 

H. A. Wills. 



RECK E A TION. 



xxvn 




Best Bicycle in the World. 

LIGHT, GRACEFUL, STRONG, SPEEDY, BEAUTIFULLY FINISHED, 

EXQUISITELY DESIGNED, 




Four Models, $85 and $100. 

Elegant 40-page catalogue free at any agency or mailed for postage. 

MONARCH CYCLE MFG. CO. 

Lake and Halsted Sts., CHICAGO, ILL. 

EASTERN WAREHOUSE ; 79 Readc St. and 97 Chambers St., New York. 

The C. F. Gunyon Co., Ltd., Managers. 

BRANCHES: Boston, San Francisco, Portland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Memphis, Detroit. 



XXV111 



RECREA T10N. 



s 



Deer Park 



PEND THE SUMMER AT 



OR 



Oakland 




/ 



On the Crest of the Alleghanies. 
3,000 Feet Above Tide Water. 



-*-•-*- 



Season Opens June 22, 1895. 

These famous mountain resorts, situated at the summit of the Alleghanies, and directly 
upon the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, have the advantage of its 
splendid vestibuled express train service both east and west, and are therefore readily- 
accessible from all parts of the country. All Baltimore and Ohio trains stop at Deer Park 
and Oakland during the season. 

The houses and grounds are lighted by electricity. Turkish and Russian baths and 
large swimming pools are provided for ladies and gentlemen, and suitable grounds for 
lawn tennis ; there are bowling alleys and. billiard rooms ; fine riding and driving horses, 
carriages, mountain wagons, tally-iio coaches, etc., are kept for hire ; in short, all the nec- 
essary adjuncts for the comfort, health or pleasure of patrons. 

Rates, $60, $75 and $90 a Month, According to Location. 

'TTTi 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 !: 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 s 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 



^\ LL communications should be addressed to 
U GEORGE D. DeSHIELDS, Manager Baltimore 
T * and Ohio Hotels, Cumberland, Md., up to June 
1 Oth ; after that date, Deer Park, Garrett County, Md. 



RECREA TTON. 



XXIX 



Shipley's Special Offers : 

=$5.00= 



FOR A 

FISHERMAN'S OUTFIT. 

Lots of people who intend going fishing this summer 
will be glad to know that we have carefully selected a 
complete outfit of Fishing Tackle for their wants, and 
marhed down the price. This is a bona fide offer 
to introduce our celebrated goods to new users. Either 
outfit will be sent to any address free of charge, on 
receipt of $5.00. 

For Bait Fishing; — Six-strip split Bamboo 
Rod, nickel mounted, with seamless ferules, solid reel 
plate, silk wrappings and cork hand-grip, 9, g% or 10 
feet in length, weight from 8 to 9 ounces, extra tip and 
put up in flannel covered grooved wooden forms, with 
muslin case ; sixty yard nickel-plated raised pillar bal- 
ance handle, multiplying reel, with click and drag; fifty 
yards oiled silk line, double gut leader; one dozen and 
a half assorted hooks, sinkers and float, disgorger, col- 
lapsing drinking cup in japanned tin case, and a nickel- 
plated bass or pike spoon. 

For Fly Fishing 1 — Rod similar to the one in 
bait outfit, but weighing only from 6 to 7 ounces, and 
with the reel seat below the hand grasp; sixty yards bal- 
ance; handle nickel-plated, click reel, with raised pillars; 
twenty-five yards of oiled silk line ; one dozen good 
quality trout flies, half dozen bass flies, assorted to 
suit the locality from which the order comes ; half a 
dozen trout hooks; one mist-colored leader; six.feet long 
and one patent fly hook. 

FISH TAKERS AND MEDAL TAKERS , 

Send five 2-cent stamps for 116-page Illustrated Cata- 
logue of Rods, Tackle, Sundries and Books. 

A. B. SHIPLEY & SON, 

503 Commerce St., PHILADELPHIA. 

SIIOOOCQ With the Camera 
uccess Assured 



WHEN USING 

Garbntt's .*. Dry:. Plates 

and Celluloid Films=Cut Sizes. 

Used the world over, and tested in every clime. 

ECLIPSE27 ^or portraits and 

■HMn—Mn-Mnm^— o Shutter Exposures. 

ORTHO 23 to 27 Fo . r A " istic 

____ _ ________ mmm 2 m and Scien- 
tific Work. 

B SEN 16 j? or Time ? x P^ rc * * n * 

ri'^Z And the BEST 
Plate for Beginners. 

J, C. TABLOIDS. 

A powerful developer, specially intended for In- 
stantaneous Exposures, produces good negatives with 
only half the ordinary exposure, equally good for 
time exposures, and developing Lantern Slides. 

Price, 75 cents per box, post free. Contains enough 
to develop 6 to 12 dozen 4x5 Plates or Films. 

SIMPLE, CLEAN AND HANDY. 

For sale by all Merchants in Photographic Materials. 

JOHN CARBUTT, 

KEYSTONE DRY Wayne Junction, 

PLATE AND FILM WORKS. Philadelphia. 
Send for New Catalogue and Reduced Price List. 



i» MMM »» MMM » MMM «»»»»»»««« + J««£ 



HUNT AND FISH?! 



DO YOU 



N 
O 

R 
T 
H 
E 
R 
N 




P 
A 

C 
I 
F 

I 
C 



Four Cents will bring you our new j> 

Game Book. 

Six Cents will bring our handsome «► 

\ new Tourist Book. 

CHAS. S. FEE, Gen. Pass. Agent, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Some tt&Pe Opportunities. 



TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

Two yearly subscriptions to RECREATION at 

$1 each, I will give a copy of " Hunting in 

the Great West;" paper. 
Three subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of " The 

Battle of the Big Hole;" cloth. 
Four subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of " Camp- 
ing and Camp Outfits;" cloth. 
Five subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of " Cruis- 

ings in the Cascades;" cloth. 
.Six subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 'American 

Game Fishes;" cloth. 
Seven subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of ' The 

Big Game of North America," or of "The 

American Book of the Dog;" cloth. 
Ten subscriptions at $1 each, a single shot Rifle 

worth $10, or a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod 

worth $10. 
Fifteen subscriptions at $1 each, a single barrel 

breech loading Shot Gun worth $15. 
Twenty-five subscriptions at $1 each, a double 

barrel breech loading Shot Gun worth $25. 
Thirty-five subscriptions at $1 each, a double barrel 

hammerless breech loading Shot Gun worth 
Seventy-five subscriptions at fl each, a Safety 

Bicycle worth 5-5. 

These Guns and Bicycles 
shipped direct from factory. 
at which manufacturers sell. 
to get a book, a gun or a bicycle free of o 
offers relate only to subscriptions to be sent in here- 
after, and not to such as may already have been I 



are new, and will be 
Prices named are t 
1 [ere is a good chi 



RECREATION, 216 William St., New York. 



XXX 



RECREATION, 




THE SANDOW BICYCLE LOCK, 

STRONG, SMALL AND SECURE. 

Attachable to the Chain and Sprocket Wheel. 

50 CENTS. 

THIEF PROOF. EASILY ADJUSTED. 

The Sandow is the only bicycle lock which fills a long felt want 
among Bicycle riders, because it is thief proof and can be carried 
in the tool bag or vest pocket, with key attachable to key chain. 

A mystery to unlock until shown how. Cannot be picked open 
or cut. 

SOLD BY ALL BICYCLE DEALERS, 

or sent to amy address on receipt of 50 cents. Send for complete 
catalogue of Cyclometers, Star Lamp Brackets, etc. 

The Bridgeport Gun Implement Co. 

313 & 315 Broadway, New York. 



Sportsmen, Look Here! 

RIFLE AND REVOLVER CARTRIDGES 
LOADED WITH SMOKELESS POWDER. 



22 Short R. F. 



32 S. & W.C. F. 



- NOW READY. 



Other Calibres 

in Preparation. 




NOW READY. 



38 S. & W. C. F. 



25-20 Marlin C. F. 



Other Calibres 

in Preparation. 



Compared with cartridges loaded with Black powder 

U. M.f C. SMOKELESS CARTRIDGES 

are equal in accuracy and have many advantages, including the following : 

INCREASED VELOCITY, GREATER EXECUTION, SMOKELESS, NO 

LEADING OF BARRELS, LESS RECOIL, LESS NOISE. 



Now ready in limited quantities. Branded " Nitro," maroon color, using new No. 5 Primer. A 
perfect shell for nitro powders, and positively does not require priming with black powder. Same 
price as other low-priced shells. 

Send for Catalogue. 

THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



RECREA TION. 



Accurate Shooting 

CAN ONLY BE DONE WITH A PERFECT GUN. 




The Remington Hammerless 

Is the finest 6un made in America, and is not excelled by any 
imported arm. 




. . . . All Grades Have . . . . 



Damascus Barrels, 
English Walnut Stock, 
Case-Hardened Frame and 

Mountings, 
Automatic Safety, 



Purdy Fore-End Snap, 

Triple Bolt, 

Top Snap, 

Extension Rib with Bite, 

Flat Matted Rib. 



AUTOMATIC EJECTING. 
NON-A UTOMA TIC EJECTING. 



Price $45.00 and Upward 



The Remington Arms Co. 



Send for Catalogue. 



iijioN, nsr. tt. 

New York Office, 31 5 Broadway. New York City, 



RECREA TJON. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF 1894, WON BY ROLLO 0. HEIKES, WITH A 



WINCHESTER 



REPEATING 
SHOT-GUN 



MODEL 1893. 

May 18th— Chicago, Lake Street Elevator Gold Cup. 

Score 81 out of 100. 
May 9th— Columbus, Ohio, State Championship Cup, 

49 out of 50. Ohio State Journal Cup, 28 out of 30. 

1st average, 98 per cent. 
Sept. 4th, 5th and 6th,— New London, Conn., Standard 

Keystone Trophy, L. C, Smith Trophy, and Peters 

Cartridge Co. Trophy. Longest straight run 
June 28th— Elwood, Ind., 50 straight. 

(Novelty Rules.) 
June 27th— Columbus, Ohio, 100 

straight. (Unknown Angles.) 
Sept. 19th— Chattanooga, Tenn. , 13 7 

straight. (Unknown Angles.) 




FIRST 

AVERAGES. 

April 19th, Pittsburg Pa., 
92 per cent. 

May 8th, 9th and 10th, Co- 
lumbus, O., State Tourna- 
ment, 98 per cent. 

May 22d, 23d and 24th, Knoxville, Tenn , 
95 15/100 per cent. 

June 19th, 20th and 21st, Cleveland, Ohio, 
93 84/100 per cent. 
June 27th and 28th, Elwood, Ind., First Day, 92 per 
cent. Second day, 88 14/17 per cent. 

July 18th and 19th, Louisville, Ky., First Day, 95^ 
per cent. Second Day, 91 per cent. 

Sept. 19th and 20th, Chattanooga, Tenn., First Day, 
92 per cent. Second Day, 93>£ per cent. 




FOR If IT R O POWD ERS 



The Winchester Repeating Shot-gun is manufactured by the 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. 

New Haven, Conn. 

For sale by all dealers. Not retailed from the factory. 



Mention Recreation. 



PRINTED BY P. F. McBREEN, CLUB PRESS, 216 & 218 WILLIAM STREET. NEW YORK. 



VOLUME III. 
NUMBER 2 



Avigust, 1 895, 



$1 A YEAR. 
10c. ACOPY 













RECREA TION. 



THE PARKER GUN 

WON THE GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP IN 1895. 




It is tlie Strongest Snooting and Best Gun in the World. 

WE ARE THE OLDEST MAKERS OF BREECH LOADING SHOT GUNS IN AMERICA. 
Ask your Dealer for a PARKER. Write us for CATALOGUE. 



PARKER BROS., MERIDEN, CONN. 

New York Salesroom, 97 CHAMBERS STREET. 

SCOTT'S MONTE CARLO 

LATEST AUTOMATIC EJECTOR HAMMERLESS. 



Also Westley Richards, 
Greener, Purdey, 
Lang, Colt, 
Parker, &c. 



We have these with 

ordinary style 

stock, or with 

special stock. 




OTHER GUNS TAKEN IN TRADE. 

The fact that the Scott gun has again taken the Grand Prize at | Send J° r ™ al0|rU \£? !?l°L 

Monte Carlo, thS time for Sofpounds sterling, with Object of Art, shot • Second-HandGun.. Also of !»• 
for by ninety-three competitors, speaks volumes in its praise. | Flshlnar laciue. 

AGENTS: WM. READ & SONS, 107 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



RECREATION. 

Copyright May, 1895, by G. O. Shields. 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything that the Name Implies. 



Ji.oo A Year, 

10 Cents A Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



216 William Street, 

New York. 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER. 

Page 

" An Immense Grizzly Bear Came Out." Frontispiece. 

Crossing the Rockies in '61. Illustrated Major W. H. Sciiieffelix. 53 

A Morning Rise. (Poem.) Walter M. Hazeltine. 56 

Salmon Fishing in Labrador. Illustrated Col. Charles E. Fuller. 57 

By the Camp Fire. (Poem.) Illustrated Hon. H. B. Jewell. 60 

Random Shots from a Hunter's Camp. Illustrated Harvey M. Harper. 61 

My Hunting and Fishing Companions. Illustrated Dr. W. H. Steele. 67 

A New Day. (Poem.) Frank II. Sweet. 69 

Lunar. (Poem.) Illustrated , David B. Keeler. 71 

Coursing with the Greyhound. Illustrated L. F. Bartels. 73 

A Hero in the Ranks. Illustrated Lieut. Alex. T. Dean. 77 

Ducking on the Ninnescah. Illustrated A. W. Bitting. 82 

Guatemotzin. — The Last of the Aztecs Dr. E. J. Tucker. 84 

The White Goat in Evidence Chas. H. Kingsbury. 89 

Entered as Second Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17th, 1894, 



OUR 1894 MODEL. 



The New Ideal Rifle 





Send for Catalogue. 



JMade for 22, 25, 32 and 38 rim fire or center 
fire cartridges, as ordered. Can be dis- 
mounted and assembled in a few seconds. Can 
be carried in a trunk or short gun case. Solid 
frame and drop lever action similar to that of the 
Ballard rifle. 

All styles of Stevens' Rifles and 
Pistols in stock. 




5 shots, 25 yards off- 
hand, with No. 2 Rifle. 
22-cal. 



J. Stevens' Arms and Tool Co. 

p.o. box m, 

Chicopee Falls, Mass. 
U. S. A. 




5 ehota, 40 yards off- 
hand, with No. 1 Rifle. 
32-cal. 



PRINTED BY P. F. McBREEN, CLUB PRESS, 216 &, 218 WILLIAM STREET. HEW YORK. 



II 



RECREA TION. 




THE 



BRISTOL 



STEEL ROD 



Lands anything that hitches on to it. 



THE BRISTOL 

Is indestructible. It is more springy, easier to handle, neater in appearance and lighter for its 

weight than any wood rod is or ever will be. 

Fifteen sizes, styles and weights. Sold by all first-class dealers. 
40-page catalogue free. 



The Horton Manufacturing Company, 

BRISTOL, CONN. 



Mutual Reserve Fund Life Association. 

E. B. HARPER, PRESIDENT. 

$40,000,000 Saved in Premiums. 

The Mutual Reserve, by reducing the rates to 
harmonize with the payments to widows and or- 
phans, has already saved its policy-holders more 
than Forty Million Dollars in premiums. 

1881. THE ELOQUENCE OF RESULTS. 1895. 

No. of Policies in force, over « 98,00a 

Interest Income, annually exceeds $135,000 

Bi-Monthly Income exceeds $750,000 

Reserve Emergency Fund exceeds $3,860,000 

Death Claims paid, over $21,000,000 

New Business received in 1894 exceeded $81,000,000 

Total Insurance in force $300,000,000 




60 



The total cost for the past fourteen years, for £% ^^■ 
$i 0,000 insurance in the Mutual Reserve vfclB 
amounts to less than Old System Companies ^^^^ 
n QI1 i charge for $4,50O at ordinary life rates— a « Pent 
rol UClU. saving, in premiums, which is equal to a cash r CI UGHl 
, dividend of nearly GO per cent. „ 



40 



MUTUAL RESERVE BUILDING. 

MILLION DOLLARS 
SAVED IN PREMIUMS 



40 



The Mutual Reserve, by reducing 
the rates to harmonize with the payments to 
widows and orphans, has already saved its 
policy-holders more, than Forty Million Dollars 
in Premiums. 



EXCELLENT POSITIONS OPEN in its Agency 
Department in every Town, City and State to experienced 
and successful business men, who will find the Mutual Re- 
serve the very best Association they can 
work for. 

HOME OFFICE \ 

MUTUAL RESERVE BUILDING, 

Cor. Broadway c duane St., New York. 



RECREATION. iij 



JDOGS BOARZ>ET>. 



SPRATTS K E NNELiS 

WITHIN EASY DISTANCE OF NEW YORK, 

Have been thoroughly reorganized (and in the near future will 

be much enlarged.) 



Resident Manager, W. H. MACKAY. 

Consulting Veterinarian, T. G. SHERWOOD, M. R. C. V. S. 

These Kennels are now under the direct supervision of our Show Superintendent, Mr. E. M. 
OLDHAM, President American Spaniel Club, etc., etc. 



DOGS BOARDED, NURSED, PREPARED FOR SHOWS, ETC 



Send for particulars and free pamphlets on Dog Diseases, to 

SPRATTS PATENT, Ltd., 

245 EAST 56th STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 



E. I. DUPONT de NEMOURS & CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Smoke less P owder. 

The Safest, Strongest, Quickest and Cleanest Nitro Powder in the world. 
Less Smoke than any other Nitro. Will not Pit or Rust the barrels. 

High Velocity with Moderate Pressure. Close and Even Pattern, with 
Great Penetration. The Nitro for which Sportsmen have been waiting. 



SEND TO US FOR PRICE-LIST WITH DIRECTIONS FOR LOADING. 

OR TO 

CLINTON BIDWELL, - 14 West Swan St., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
SHOEMAKER & VOUTE, 126 So.th Del. Ave. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. P. COLLINS, - 22 South Calvert Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 
ARTHUR HYNDMAN, - - 12 Pine Street, 



E. S. RICE, ... 62 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago. 
WM. McBLAIR, - 509 North Third Street, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
R. S. WADDELL, - 45 West Second Street, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
FRED. J. WADDELL, Cor. 8th & Chestnut Sts., 



Chattanooga, Tenn. New York. 

L. C. THORNHILL, - 54 Gravier Street, j GEO. E. SMITH & CO., - 7 Central Wharf, 

New Orleans, La. Bos on, Mass. 

D. W. C. BIDWELL & CO., - 143 Water St., S. C. MADDEN, - 1310 Eighteenth Street, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Denver, Col. 

C. A. HAIGHT, 226 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



I V 



RECREA TION. 




The Residence Property " PINEHURST," on the North= 

West Corner of Depot Lane (W. 176 St.) and 

Fort Washington Avenue, in 

New York City, 

The plot comprises over 27 city lots, and has a frontage of about 220 feet on 
Depot Lane, and of about 310 feet on Fort Washington Avenue. The cable cars 
now run within four blocks of Pinehurst, on Amsterdam Avenue, but the new ex- 
tension of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company will bring the cable line on 
to~Kingsbridge Road, within one short block of the place; and the rapid transit 
railway will also pass in the immediate vicinity on Eleventh Avenue. 

The location is an exceptionally healthy one, exposed to the sea breeze, as 
being on the highest ridge of Manhattan Island, on an avenue which nature has 
destined for a select and fashionable residence thoroughfare. Fort Washington 
Avenue commences at the Church of the Intercession, on the Boulevard at 158th 
Street, and continues to the northward about three miles towards Inwood. It is 
in the heart of the new system of boulevards and avenuf s, and in the immediate 
vicinity of High Bridge and of Washington Bridge. 

The buildings represent a value of about $35,000, and consist of a handsome 
modern brick villa — basement, three stories and tower — and of a coach-house with 
stable. The construction is of brick with stone basement, slate and tin roof ; hot 
and cold water on every floor of house, gas throughout the house, ako speaking 
tubes, ventilators, etc. The steam heater was put in new in 1893, and the plumb- 
ing was entirely renewed and put in in accordance with the latest regulations of the 
Board of Health, in June, 1894. The private sew T er was rebuilt at the same time. 

Pinehurst is especially adapted for residence purposes, and has handsome 
grounds with ornamental shade trees and shrubs, besides fruit and vegetable 
garden, and is most desirable property for speculative investment. 

The owner will not place the sale in the hands of any individual exclusively, 
but is willing to pay the customary commission to any broker who may complete 
the sale. Address all inquiries to 

" PINEHURST," Fort Washington Ave., New York City. 



RECREA TION. 



MODEL 1893. 

]WA$liI]4. 





All Lengths and Styles, Regular and TAKE-DOWN. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 



IF 



THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS CO., 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Send 15 cents and we will mail a pack of highest quality playing cards, special design. 

you would forget the cares of city life for a season ; if you would inhale the ozone 
of spruce and pine ; if you would be lulled by the gentle ripple of clear, cold water ; 
if you would struggle with the Muskalonge, the Lake Trout, or the Black Bass, go to 

"THE MANITOWISH," 



TROUT LAKE, WIS. 




'SHeM^ITOWSIi" 1 
TROUT LAKE, QMl: «4d 




Open from May to November. 

This roomy log cabin, with its old-fashioned fire-place, comfortable beds, and good table, is builj on a high 
and breezy point, and every window commands a view of some portion of this lovely lake. One night's rid' 
Chicago. Daily stage meets morning train at Woodruff, on the Chica. tnwestern Rv Good liveries 

await passengers coming via Minocqua, on the Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul Rv Terms, $2 a day, $10 a week. 

REFERENCES. Jno. A. Scudder, J. G. Prather. St. Louis; F. D. Gray. 1 Frank, Lawrence K. K. Dunn, 
Chicago ; W. L. Bigelow, Minneapolis; Jno. N. Simpson, Dallas, and Will 11. Mourning, Louisville. 

P. 0. Address, J. B. MANN, Reynolds, Wis. Telegraph, Woodruff, Wis. 



VI 



RECREATION 




CTOR 



Athletic Goods 



Represent the standard of excellence. 

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OVE^AJi WHEEL! CO 

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Boston. New York. Detroit. Denver. Pacific Coast: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland. 



Volume III. 



RECREATION. 

AUGUST, 1895. 

G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 2. 



The American News Co., Agents for the U. S. and Canada. The International News Co., General Agents for Europe. 
Offices: Breams Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, E. C, England ; Stephanstrasse 18, Leipsig, Germany. 



CROSSING THE ROCKIES IN '61. 

Maj. W. H. Schieffelin. 

Continued from page 21. 



One day we saw, about five miles 
back from the trail, a large black 
animal moving slowly. The men 
said, " bear or buffalo." I was riding a 
good horse and at once went after the 
game. He soon took me to it. It 
proved to be a big buffalo bull. He of 
course stampeded when he saw me 
coming, but my horse soon put me along- 
side the great brute and kept me there 
until I emptied my revolver in his 
shoulder. Thanks to the horse, I got 
my first buffalo bull without any assist- 
ance from any one. While I was cutting 
out his tongue, Mr. Cary came up and 
made a sketch of him. He was a fine 
old bison, but tough, and made no ob- 
jection to being killed. Many of the 
old bulls turn and fight furiously when 
wounded, but this one seemed to have 
lost his combative spirit, if he had ever 
had any. 

Buffalo were abundant all along the 
upper river. At times the plains were 
covered with them as far as the eye 
could reach. 

One morning when we awakened we 
saw what seemed to be millions of buf- 
falo, and as we were short of meat, pre- 
pared for a run. About ten of us 
mounted for the fray. In order to be 
successful, we were advised to go as 
light as possible ; so most of us wore no 
coats. Some had handkerchiefs around 
their heads, instead of hats ; light pads, 
with stirrups in place of saddles and 
most of us carried revolvers. I had 
two. We were told to obey the orders 
of our half-breed leader and not to 
charge until he told us, but then to go 
as fast as we could. We cantered up to 
within 200 feet of them, before they 
commenced to move, when he gave the 
word " charge." We rushed in, and the 
whole herd started and turned by the 



left flank, so that we were immediately 
in the midst of them. We had been 
told to select the fat cows. The race 
was awfully exciting. I rode beside a 
fine looking cow — being jostled and 
rubbed against by the other buffaloes — 
and shot her three times, behind the 
shoulder, before she left the herd. I 
passed on and selected another and 
fired three or four shots at her when 
she too dropped out. So I kept on 
until I had emptied both my revolvers 
when I turned back to finish those I 
had wounded. We found some 20 buf- 
faloes, either killed or fatally wounded. 
We had a great feast that day, and all 
agreed that a fat buffalo cow's rib was 
the best meat in the world. 
* * * 

Finally, after many days of slow but 
interesting travel, with the ox train, we 
reached Fort Benton, the head of navi- 
gation on the upper Missouri. We were 
hospitably entertained by the post 
trader and Indian agent, and greatly en- 
joyed a two weeks' rest. 

They had some good horses at the 
post and a race course, four miles long 
and as level as a floor. It encircled a 
hill from which a fine view of the races 
could be had, from start to finish. 
Several races were run, for our enter- 
tainment, between Indians and whites. 
The eastern bred horses were better, 
however, than the Indian ponies, and 
nearly all the races were won by the 
whites. 

While at the Fort I became intimately 
acquainted with " Little Dog " or " Imi- 
taque," a Blackfoot chief and a good 
man, when sober, but he had the bad 
habit of getting drunk and then always 
wanted to kill somebody. A short time 
before our arrival, he had killed one of 
his best friends in a drunken brawl ; but 



53 



54 



RECREATION. 




SOME CHANCE ACQUAINTANCES. 



during my acquaintance with him he 

was always quiet, inoffensive, and 

seemed anxious to please me. We used 

to take long walks and rides together, 

but I was careful not to give him 

liquor, or to allow any one else to 

do so. 

* * * 

As a rule, the white men we met on 
the frontier, though fair with us, were 
not so with the Indians. They (except 
the leading men of the Fur Company) 
thought nothing of cheating, robbing or 
killing an Indian, and the wonder is 
that the Indian is as good as he is. 
Some exceptions are found in white 



trappers adopted into Indian tribes, as 
they are loyal to them. Many of the 
frontiersmen were outlaws from the 
States, on account of some crime com- 
mitted, and neither by their example 
nor precepts doing the Indians any 
good. I do not remember any service 
held on Sunday, or any difference made 
in the day from a week-day. 



Having completed our arrangements 
for crossing the Rockies, we left Fort 
Benton on a bright September morning, 
with 15 horses purchased from the 
American Fur Company, one cart to 



CROSSING THE ROCKIES IN % 6i. 



55 




'AND WENT DOWN THE HILLSIDE. 



^vhich we drove a tandem, one Black- 
foot Indian and a half-breed boy, as 
driver and herdsman, and a colored 
man engaged from the steamboat, as 
cook. An old trapper, whom we had 
engaged as guide was to meet us about 
40 miles out toward the Rockies, but 
just as we were starting, he sent word 
that he had changed his mind, as he 
feared Indian troubles, and had decided 
to remain with his squaw and children. 
My two friends agreed to go ahead, with 
myself as leader. On the first day out, 
we met with an accident, about 15 miles 
from the Fort. In crossing a hill, with 
•our cart and tandem, the leader took 
an Indian trail which made a short cut, 
instead of going over the top. The 



side of the hill was so steep that our 
cart turned over, taking with it the two 
horses and a dog, tied underneath, and 
went down the hillside about 200 feet — 
horses, cart and dog all mixed together. 
Our flour, coffee and other provisions, 
our tinware and personal effects were 
scattered by the wayside. We looked 
on, from the hill top, in dismay, and 
after a few feeble remarks, appropriate 
to the occasion, slid down to the wreck, 
when we found, to our great relief, that 
the only damage was a broken shaft, 
and a few slight scratches on the horses 
and the dog. We gathered up our duf- 
fle, went into camp, and sent a mes- 
senger back to the Fort for help. He 
brought out the blacksmith and a new 



56 



RECREA TWN. 



shaft, and we were able to start afresh 
the next day, thankful the accident had 
occurred so near the Fort. 

As leader it was my duty to ride ahead 
of the party every afternoon and select 
a camping place for the night, where 
there was good water and grass for the 
horses. One fine evening, when about a 
mile ahead, I saw a large bush in great 
commotion, sbaking as if in a hard wind. 
I approached to find out the cause of the 
disturbance, when an immense grizzly 
bear came out, rose up on his hind legs, 
and looked at me, apparently as much 
surprised as I was. My horse was 
terrified, yet made no effort to run. 
He simply stood still and trembled 
violently, and I think I was about 
as badly frightened as he was. For- 
tunately for me my rifle was in a 



rather tight buffalo skin case, across the 
pommel of my saddle, and I was unable 
to get it out in time to shoot. If I had 
done so, the chances are I should only 
have wounded the bear, for my horse 
shook so that I could not have gotten a 
true aim. Old Ephraim seemed to me 
to tower above my horse as he stood 
up and inspected me ; but, after a few 
whiffs, he seemed not to like my appear- 
ance and started down the mountain 
side, making 30 or 40 feet at a jump. 
My horse was a fast runner, but going 
down hill, the bear could go three feet 
to my one. He was soon out of sight 
and I had lost a bear. After that, I 
carried my rifle without the skin case, 
but two days later dropped it from the 
saddle and broke the stock, which ended 
its usefulness for that trip. 



(to be continued.) 



A MORNING RISE. 
Walter M. Hazeltine. 

Under the fringe of woodland shading, 

Tilting out in wavering lines, 
Over the lake in the unseen fading, 

Tremble the shadowy stubs of pines. 

Flashing across the bay of shadow, 
A crimson sun-path wavers down, 

Where the ripples dance and toss and tumble, 
Opal, and pearl, and golden brown. 

Tiny waves that leap and sparkle, 
Catching the gold of the rising sun, 

Tossing it back to a cheerful measure, 
Losing it deep in a cave of dun. 

Out of the meshes of the sun-path, 
Tipsy, woven in changing way, 

The sudden leap of a golden beauty, — 
King of the mountain lake, at play. 



Only a flash, and the eddying cadence, 
Weaves away like a silver bow, 

Fading, lost in the perfect silence, 

Drowned in the mirror of molten snow. 



SALMON FISHING IN LABRADOR. 



Col Charles E. Fuller. 



Several years ago I made a trip 
to the Natasquhan river, in Labra- 
dor, in company with five enthu- 
siastic anglers. It was predicted for us 
by Mr. Spurr, of St. John, N. B., who 
had fished the river, that it would be the 
grand fishing trip of our lives, and so it 
proved to be. 

We left Boston on the 30th of June, 
and at Quebec took the steamer for 
Gaspe, where we had previously engaged 
a schooner and six guides (some of them 
Indians), to take us across the Gulf of 
St. Lawrence to the mouth of the river. 

Our trip across the Gulf was made in 
good weather. We saw flocks of ducks 
in the water, miles and miles long, near 
the Labrador coast, and millions of wild 
fowl of every description nestling on 
the numerous islands that skirted the 
4< North Shore." When we arrived at 
the mouth of the river a heavy gale had 
set in and breakers at least six feet 
high were running across the channel, 
through which two Esquimaux pilots 
paddled out to us in a short high birch 
canoe. It was interesting to see them 
piloting our schooner over the bar 
through the very crooked channel at its 
mouth, one of them standing on the tip 
end of the bowsprit waving his hand 
first one way and then another, which 
was responded to by the one at the 
wheel. We had a pretty tough time 
going up the river in our canoes. 

The river was very wide and at a 
low stage of water, with numerous 
long and narrow sand banks in the mid- 
dle, which we tried to walk upon to 
relieve our heavily laden canoes, but the 
clouds of dry sand, blowing, made it 
tedious walking. We tried the banks 
of the river, but found them covered 
with fallen trees, originally 15 to 20 feet 
high, but now broken in two, near the 
middle, by the heavy snows of winter, 
and so interwoven by brush and briars 
that we could not go five feet without 
cutting our way with an axe. 

Mr. Joseph Peabody and myself made 
the camp just before dark, the other 
four canoes and the schooner's long 
boat, with our tents and supplies were 
strung along, miles in the rear. We 
were very hungry, supplies not yet in 



sight, so Mr. Peabody set up his rod, 
made a few casts, hooked and landed a 
fine salmon, which we split and cooked 
before an open fire We ate it without 
butter or salt, but it was delicious. A 
salmon never tasted so good to me 
before nor since. There were four 
pools near our camp, two at the 2d fall, 
one mile up the river, and one magnifi- 
cent pool at the 3d fall, 3 or 4 miles 
away. The river at this point is divided 
by an island at the top of the fall and 
the river looked like a miniature Ni- 
agara — solid green water on one side of 
the island and white water on the other 
side. This is one of the finest pools in 
the world for salmon. When the pool 
is quiet, and there has been no fishing 
there for a few days, you would be sate 
in making a bet that you could raise a 
salmon on the first cast and repeat it, 
after landing your fish, at least for half 
a dozen casts. Mr. Long, of Boston. 
Mr. William Muller, of London, and 
myself, made three simultaneous short 
casts in the square pool, 3d fall, stand- 
ing on a rock, within ten feet of each 
other, and each one of us hooked a 
salmon. We had some quick work 
changing positions and passing our rods 
over and under one another, but we were 
all successful in landing our fish — Mr. 
Muller landing his, without a gaff, by 
the tail, English fashion. At the third 
fall we could see one or more salmon in 
the air all the time. They were jump- 
ing a small fall of four or five feet below 
the main fall, up which they swam alter 
resting in a small pool behind a large 
rock. Here we could see the fins ol 
the salmon as thick as sardines in a box. 
From this half-way pool they made con- 
tinued attempts to swim up the main 
fall and were generally successful. In 
the bright sunlight we could see the en- 
tire form of the fish in the thin, foamy 
white water as they swam diagonally up 
the fall at an angle of about 70 degi 

The fourth fall being too far away 
from camp to go and return the same 
day, we too-k our tents and camped 
there, three at a time, so as to equally 
divide the fishing. Owing to the con- 
tinued low stage of the water in the 
river, the salmon of the previous year 



57 



RECREATION. 




"THE FISH BENT HIS BODY ALMOST IN THE FORM OF A SEMI-CIRCLE. 



FISHING IN IABRADOR. 



59 



had not been able to pass the fall to 
their spawning ground, and had re- 
mained in the river through the winter. 
They were as thin as a rail, almost 
round, and as black as a river pickerel. 
In fishing parlance they were racers, so 
totally different from the fresh run sal- 
mon that you would hardly believe they 
belonged to the same species. 

The salmon that had just come into 
the river were continually making inef- 
fectual efforts to get above the fall by 
jumping four or five feet up into a little 
pool, about six feet square, and from 
one to three feet deep. Then they 
would try to run up a thin sheet of 
water that was running over the top of 
the fall. I told my friends that if I 
could catch a salmon with my hands 
while in the air, I would have a cham- 
pion fish story to tell. So seating my- 
self in the cold water, I would wait 
until a fish would jump into the pool, 
from the river below. I, of course, be- 
ing out of sight until he was in the air. 
I would then seize him, as near the 
head as possible, when he would slip, 
either forward or backward, accordingly 
as I had hold of him. 

After I had seized two or three sal- 
mon and they had escaped, they would 
cease jumping into the pool for a couple 
of hours, my victims giving information, 
I have no doubt, in some way to the 
others in the river that there was danger 
on the rocks above. In the afternoon 
I tried it again with no better success. 
They were as strong and as slippery as 
an eel. I was not to be beaten, how- 
ever, and the next day waded into the 
pool again. This time I succeeded in 
getting a firm hold, under the gills, of a 
20 pound salmon. Then came the tus- 



sle to get on my feet ; then out of the 
water and then to get up on the bank of 
the river, over a perpendicular rock four 
feet high. When I first stood up the 
fish bent his body almost in the form of 
a semi-circle and it was with the great- 
est effort that I saved myself from be- 
ing forced over the falls into the river 
below. I am a fair wrestler and I 
would be about as willing to take my 
chances of not being thrown into the 
river with any man I ever met, as to 
again attempt to take a salmon of that 
size out of that pool. These fish are 
appropriately named " King Salmon." 
No one can realize the strength of a 
salmon, unless he has handled one 
fresh from the water, before he has had 
a long run for his life. Mr. Muller as- 
sisted me out of the pool by taking 
hold of my collar and lifting me up to a 
place of safety, and without his aid I 
should have had to let the fish escape. 
Mr. Peabody was curious to learn 
whether a salmon, coming into the fresh 
water from the sea, ever took any food, 
and if so, what kind. He examined the 
stomachs of all the fish taken, but found 
nothing in them but a little substance 
that looked like sand, so small in 
amount that you could hold it on the 
nail of your little finger. This was 
also true of the Racers found at the 
fourth fall. Why is it that a salmon will 
rise to the fly and never take a live bait? 
They no doubt take the fly from curi- 
osity, as I do not remember one ever 
taking it low in his mouth, as trout or 
black bass often do. Salmon are hooked 
only in the lips. We remained on the 
river twelve days and killed all the sal- 
mon we wanted. In one day I killed 
10 and Mr. Merritt 22. 






• 



Another year has rolled around, and I'm kinder sorter thinkin', 
As I sit beside the camp fire, a winkin' and a blinkin', 
And a wonderin' if another year will find me sittin' here, 
As I've been a doin' ev'ry fall nigh on to thirty year. 

f " ^ •*> I was late a comin' in t'night, and one reason as you'll see, 

; "« Is that big bunch o' mallards there, a hanging t' the tree ; 

And when comin' through the swail, from shooting on ther 
- , , pass, 

/ I struck a log and went clean over, head first in the grass — 

And busted my suspenders, n' filled the gun with dirt, 
N' skinned my nose, n' barked 'r shin and tore a bran new 

shirt. 
But now all's snug about the camp an' I'm feelin' pretty 

smilin'. 
As I sit and smoke ther cob while the kittle's on 'r bilin'. 



N' the embers from the logs are glowin' and 'r fallin', 
N' the night wind through the trees is a whisperin' 

and a callin' ; 
And the leaves come tickin', tackin', fallin' softly 

down 
TV join in Jack Frost's quiltin' a coverin' o' the 

groun'. 



Two trees near by like brothers grow, their limbs 
locked in together, 

N' they make a sorter fiddlin' sound a rubbin' on each 
other, 

It's all music to my ears— the hootin' o' the owls 

An' the cracklin' o' the fire, and the wolf's long, lone- 
some howls. 




But the hour is gettin' late and the fire is gettin' low, 
So I'll turn in 'side my partner who was snorin' long 

ago. 
It's still the same old story, if I'm in it and alive, 
I calkerlate to be here, 'bout this time in ninety-five. 



RANDOM SHOTS FROM A HUNTER'S CAMP. 



Harvey M. Harper. 



" Our happiest days have been spent out of doors, in the woods and fields, where we have " found 
in every woodland way, the sun-light tint and fairy gold." — Beauties of Nature. 



Except that in the breasts of we mod- 
erns there yet lurk a few flittering 
sparks of the hunter instincts of 
the early savage, there really appears to be 
scant reason why one should, nowadays, 
go a hunting. Yet, as a rule, we cannot 
remember the time when out-of-door 
sports have not been some of our most 
cherished memories. Our first essays 
are only "make believe" child's play, 
but later they develop into genuine ex- 
cursions, with older companions, to some 
strip of woods, where flows a quiet and 
demure rivulet, tenantless save for the 
omnipresent shiner or the spiney backed 
cat-fish. 

Here, in the golden autumn days of 
yore, we oft have hunted for impossible 
"signs" of the long vanished game, 
played Indian, using the guiltless family 
hatchet as a tomahawk, and when noon- 
time came, we have cooked a frugal 
meal over the glowing embers of a 
friendly camp-fire after the manner re- 
lated of such things in the yellow backed 
story books then so highly prized and in 
which, in the main, our scanty riches 
were invested. 

After a while these little excursions 
grew into regular hunting trips, with 
real guns ; and more or less real game 
rewarded our haphazard and ill-directed 
efforts. Naturally a taste for the like, 
so early acquired, ripens in time into a 
desire for a larger game and a wider ex- 
perience. I well remember the number- 
less preparatory talks and meetings 
which were indulged in, with such ex- 
huberant fancy by all the prospective 
members of the first camping party I 
was privileged to join. Books were 
read and letters written to discover the 
most likely camping ground ; lists of 
provisions were prepared and frequently 
gone over, to make sure that the com- 
missariat was provided with this or that 
particular dainty, besides everything 
needful for personal use. 

The result was something fearful to 
contemplate. To be sure the party was 
to be large and each of the twenty 



odd members was burdened with a 
great variety of real or imaginary 
necessities to be arranged for. Among 
the stores were two ranges, to be set up 
in the cook shanty, for that purpose 
made and provided, for, be it known, we 
were to be served by two Pullman cooks, 
who could hardly be expected to be 
versed in the management of forked 
sticks, Dutch ovens and such other crude 
equipment of the true camper out. Then 
there were barrels of flour, corn meal, 
and sugar; heaps of coffee, tea and 
chocolate; hams and good old bacon a 
plenty ; jelly, jam, pickles and olives in 
great quantities — for the girls. The 
outfit when assembled together, looked 
like the quartermaster's stores of a mi- 
litia regiment on riot duty ; and it was 
indeed well that we were to go by steam- 
boat. Notwithstanding so huge a supply 
of provisions, yet owing to the extraordi- 
nary appetites to which a camping party 
must always plead guilty, half a dozen 
times a day, little was left at the end of 
the month's stay ; and we all cherish 
recollections of a thoroughly delightful 
vacation, accomplished at the tririing ex- 
pense of $30 each. 

About the game ? Well, that's another 
story, as Mulvaney would say ; but 
nearly a score of guns managed to se- 
cure half a dozen grouse, and one deer, 
during the interval. 

Bye-and-bye, after making a number 
of other trips, more or less successful, a 
better understanding of the proper way 
to go a-hunting after big game has 
been acquired. The novice is likely to 
err on the side of overburdening him- 
self with too extensive an outfit. In the 
absence of personal experience, let him 
read carefully some of the many excel- 
lent books, which may, perhaps, in lieu 
of a better term, be properly called 
Text Books of the Chase. Among these 
I may mention " Camping and Camp 
Outfits " by the Editor of RECREATION. 
The tenderfoot should also take coun- 
sel, as to his needs, with some veteran 
sportsman, and in this manner smooth 



61 



62 



RECREA TION. 




OUR CAMP ON THE LAKE SHORE. 



over what otherwise would prove a cor- 
duroy road to success. 

From these sources of information he 
may make up a list of 'the barest neces- 
sities. To these may be added such 
luxuries as individual taste or fancy may 
dictate, being governed always by the 
kind and amount of transportation 
which is intended to be used. By wagon 
or by canoe many fragile articles can be 
carried that would be quite impossible 
to take by pack train, where the rule is 
to reduce everything to its lowest pos- 
sible terms. 

I remember an instance of a youth, 
who, although the outfit meant to travel 
by pack animals over some 400 miles of 
rough mountain country, insisted on 
carrying nearly 200 pounds of ammuni- 
tion, chiefly for a shot gun that he did 
not fire once during the entire trip. 

As to choice of an objective point, 
whether.it is to be the pine woods of 
the North, or the mountain ranges or 



plains of the West, leaving out of the 
matter of expediency as to time and ex- 
pense, there can hardly be a question 
in the mind of any one who has tried 
both. He would always chose the latter. 

If the untutored sportsman is invited 
by an old hand to join him, let him un- 
derstand at once that a rare favor has- 
been offered, and never neglect to be 
duly thankful for it. But in this mate- 
rial age, the quaint and commendable 
spirit of gratitude appears to be strangely 
lacking, and instead, the mere accept- 
ance of a proffered favor is too often 
considered a sufficient requital. 

Otherwise, secure a suitable and com- 
petent guide and go with him alone. 
Not every lout who heralds himself as a 
skillful "guide" is to be trusted ; but there 
is usually to be found the right sort of a 
man if the proper inquiry is instituted 
in ample season. 

The chances of learning how to hunt, 
and of getting game, are in this manner 



RANDOM SHOTS FROM A HUNTER'S CAM J'. 



63 



greatly enhanced. Success in hunting, 
1 hold, decreases in the inverse ratio to 
the increase in the number of people in 
the party. 

But if for the sake of company, or for 
other reasons, you prefer the party to 
consist of several persons, great care 
ought to be exercised in selecting your 
companions. For days, weeks, or months, 
perhaps, you will live in an intimacy im- 
possible under almost any other circum- 
stances ; and once in the wilderness 
these conditions cannot be changed. 
But you may be lucky enough, as I once 
was, to fall in with ten or a dozen gentle^ 
men among whom there was scarce a word 
spoken, or an act committed, to which 
even a fastidious person might object. 

On the contrary, your lot might be 
cast among fellows who shirk their share 
of the camp duties, or who are given to 
meaningless profanity, or who affect 
topics and a tone of conversation con- 
stantly offensive. 

Every party, large or small, must have 
a head to it, if trouble, disappointment, 
aye, even disaster, are to be averted. 
But let no one be ambitious to attain the 
honor or shoulder the burdens of this 
thankless task. The duties are annoy- 
ing and troublesome at best, during the 
life of the expedition, and are apt to be 
doubly so in settling up the finances in 
the end, unless the captain has taken 
precaution to estimate liberally for the 
money required, and has collected 
enough in advance. He would much 
better have a surplus to distribute than 
to be under the necessity of assessing for 



a deficit. In the last case, he may be so 
unwise as to liquidate the bills out of his 
own pocket, and then wait a long time, 
a very long time, perhaps, to be reim- 
bursed for his outlay. 

The captain should have nearly abso- 
lute power in the direction and manage- 
ment of all the affairs of the party. 
Among other disagreeable duties, he 
ought to require personal neatness of 
every member of the outfit. Now I ad- 
mit that no small part of the joy of 
camp life is the freedom from the re- 
straint and conventionalities of one's 
customary life ; but it ought not to ex- 
tend so far that any one could think it 
not incumbent upon him to take an oc- 
casional bath, albeit the water is usually 
cold as ice itself. 

On one trip a few years ago, after 
traveling some days through the Yellow- 
stone Park, we made camp high up in 
the Shoshone Mountains, and the first 
thing set about getting fresh meat for the 
larder. The party divided up into three 
pairs, each setting out in a different di- 
rection, determined to win the prize 
agreed to be bestowed on the man or 
men who first brought meat into camp. 
After allowing the others to select their 
routes, I set out to skirt along just be- 
low the brow of the mountain in such a 
way as to cut across well up to the head 
of the coulees leading down to the river. 
Within an hour I had an elk ; in fact I 
killed three, believing, however, that I 
had shot only the one. It happened in 
this way : The elk were jumped in an 
open grove of young fir trees. The first 




"OFF FOR A LONG JAUNT. 



6 4 



RECREA TION. 




" WITHIN AN HOUR I HAD AN ELK." 



one I saw, a spike buck, I fired at and it 
disappeared through the trees. I moved 
along to get a better view of the game, 
and presently saw the buck cross an 
opening, just ahead of where it had dis- 
appeared. I fired a second shot, and 
not seeing it drop began to distrust my 
marksmanship, or to think there was 
something wrong with the sights of the 
rifle, which I had not used before for 
two years. Just then out jumped the elk 
again, some forty yards farther down the 
draw. I fired a third time and he 
dropped. Upon examining the ground 
I found that there were three dead ani- 
mals, all spike bucks exactly alike, each 
shot through the shoulders. Their simi- 
larity accoLinted, in a measure, for my 
.mistake. I atoned, so far as I could, for 
this useless slaughter, by refraining from 
killing any more elk that trip, confining 
my attention thereafter to the antelope, 
which were rather plentiful at no great 
distance from camp. This to my mind 
is the finest sport of all. One can exer- 
cise skill in stalking, if he cares to do so, 
or he may elect to try his marksmanship 
at long range. Of this he will have un- 
limited opportunities, and may use up 
many a box of shells and yet do little 
damage to the game, or waste much 
meat. 



The old hunter, in spite of his cun- 
ning, is often no match for the luck 
which seems always to be the portion of 
the tyro. Of this J recall an instance 
where a harum-scarum lad, who had 
never before seen a wild beast larger 
than a rabbit, was the first to bring meat 
into camp; while his uncle, a seasoned 
hunter, tramped unsuccessfully over the 
mountains for days, and finally shot a 
bear that the nephew saw first and 
pointed out to him. This youth had, a 
day or two before, seen another bear, at 
which he immediately fired, then threw 
his hat at the beast, which was quite 
close. Failing to stop it in this manner, 
he sought, I suppose, to frighten the 
creature to death by chasing it down 
the mountain side, all the while howling 
like a Chinese warrior. 

The hunter is usually greatly over- 
charged for the horses he hires. To be 
asked to pay two or three times as much 
for a month's use of a thing as the thing 
itself is worth, when the damage is slight, 
or nothing at all, is preposterous. The 
average plains pony can be bought for 
$10 to $25, and to ask more than $5 a 
month hire, for him, is clearly exorbi- 
tant. Yet your guide will be quite 
likely to try to stipulate for a dollar a 
day for each horse he furnishes to the 



RANDOM SHOTS FROM A HUNTER'S CAMP. 



65 



outfit. It is advisable to own your 
saddle and bridle. 

Take good care to get good disposi- 
tioned horses. The best of bronchos 
are none too good in this respect. I 
remember one old fellow who once gave 
us no end of trouble, as well as at times 
considerable amusement. Old " Brig- 
ham " was a character, not unlike his 
Mormon namesake. Years of experi- 
ence had added craft to an already evil 
temper. Although snow-white in color, 
he was, nevertheless, the bete noire of 
the packers and horse wranglers. Upon 
him devolved the duty of carrying the 
ammunition, which was packed in two 
stout wooden boxes, weighing at least 
100 pounds each. Hardly a day passed 
without an exhibition of his prowess as 
a bucker, which finally culminated, the- 
atrically enough, in a grand climax 
just as we were going into permanent 
camp. The stage chosen by the old vil- 
lain on which to perform, was a wide 
flat, fully suited to the breadth of action 
of the piece. 

A sudden rencontre with a vagabond 
band of Bannock Indians gave old 
" Brigham " his cue, and with a squeal 
of rage, down went his nose and up 
went his heels, faster than one could 
count. In a moment he had bucked 
off one of the boxes, and then, starting 
on a run, with the other box attached 



to the end of a 20 foot lash rope, he 
circled about in mad fury, the box 
bounding and whirling at the end of its 
tether, out and in among the whole out- 
fit, scattering the pack animals in a 
grand stampede, and giving the riders 
much ado to keep clear of the awful 
engine of destruction, with which the 
old rascal was running amuck. The 
box finally went to pieces, strewing its 
contents far and wide, thus furnishing 
the bead-eyed Indian youngsters a wel- 
come chance to display their sharpness 
of vision for coin, payable on delivery 
of the findings. 

The guides often claim to have com- 
plete outfits for rent ; but this depends 
very much upon the point of view. The 
old prospector or trapper, with Spartan 
indifference to comfort, considers a 
frying-pan and a tin cup a sufficient 
"outfit," regarding plates, forks and 
spoons as superfluous luxuries The 
white enameled ware is sightlier and 
cleaner than tin, and costs a mere tritle 
more. The same may be said of the 
cheap silver-plated knives, forks and 
spoons. The quality of the provisions- 
of the frontier stores is not to be relied 
upon. Purchase your supplies at home, 
and have the sugar, coffee and such 
articles divided into small lots, and done 
up in cotton bags ; pack the whole in 
boxes about 20 inches wide, 18 inches 




A SKILLFUL AND COMPETENT GUIDE." 



<36 



RECREA TION. 



deep, and 24 to 30 inches long, pro- 
vided with rope handles, hinged lids, and 
padlocks. On the inside of each cover 
paste an inventory of the contents. 

Although in print mention of the 
soft bed of fragrant balsam boughs has 
a pleasant sound, there is really little 
merit in it. To make a prime browse 
bed takes the time of one man for sev- 
eral hours, and an immense amount of 
material ; and then the same result can 
be obtained by one or two comforters, 
which are easily carried, cost little, and 
are always ready. 

By all means take a camera, for the 
mementoes of the trip, thereby secured, 
will prove the most lasting and esteemed 
trophies of all. But don't make the 
mistake of buying one of the cheap and 
unsatisfactory " press the button" hum- 
bugs. Good pictures can be sometimes 
made with them, but the proportion of 
failures is far too large. In the hands 
of a photographic genius, prize work 
has been done with a common spectacle 
lens, but an unskilled performer ought 
to give himself the benefit of the best 
tools he can afford to buy. At best, 
snap shots, with a hand camera, are dif- 
ficult of execution, and should be sel- 
dom attempted, except on a bright day, 
over the water or on sand. To get good 
photographs takes time and trouble, but 
in the end they are the most valued 
prizes. 

A word as to mounting your views. 
The common method of using card 
mounts is not satisfactory for perma- 
nent use. The cards are hard to keep 
in order ; they catch the dust, and are 
likely to get misplaced or lost. Any 
first-class bookbinder can manage it 
much better in the following manner : 
Paste each view separately, on a sheet 



of thick writing paper, using fresh, 
clean rice paste. Arrange the sheets, 
back to back, in the order desired, then 
paste the sheets together, leaving an 
inch or so open on the left hand end, in 
which to insert a linen hinge for each 
leaf, to make the back of the book. 
These sheets may be bound up to suit 
one's taste, in regular book form, and 
thus be a lasting and enjoyable reminder 
of many a pleasant hour. 

Finally, after many weeks of prepa- 
ration, many days of weary travel, and 
the expenditure of perhaps hundreds of 
dollars, the would-be hunter arrives at 
the chosen goal only to find the forests 
ablaze in every direction ; the game scat- 
tered or'uselessly slaughtered ; all the ne- 
farious work of some ragamuffin band of 
Indians, criminally allowed to leave their 
reservation by the mistaken kindness of 
some fat witted Indian agent In a short 
while, to save a few paltry dollars to the 
government, these wretches have been 
allowed to cause damage and destruc- 
tion enough, if it could be converted 
into money, to keep them at the Wal- 
dorf for the remainder of their natural 
lives. 

Nothing but evil can come from the 
present Indian policy of this govern- 
ment. The Indian is best taught by the 
object lessons, learned by contact with 
the white man, not as it is now man- 
aged, where Lo absorbs little of the 
good and much of the bad. Let all 
the wild Indians be quartered in sever 
alty, among the tribes of the Indian ter- 
ritory, and then throw every other res- 
ervation open to settlement. What the 
Micmac, the Mohawk, and the Miami 
have learned is equally possible, under 
similar circumstances, with the Sioux, 
the Ute, or the Apache. 




MY HUNTING AND FISHING COMPANIONS. 



Dr. W. H. Steele. 



Those of your readers who have 
reached the meridian of life and 
are traveling down the shady side, 
no doubt often look back to boyhood, and 
live over again those glorious days, on 
the stream, in the wood or in the thicket. 
I am thankful for the faculty that en- 
ables me to look back and enjoy, in re- 
trospect, those boyhood days. How 
well I remember that old single barrel 
shot gun, with percussion lock, with 
powder horn, shot bottle and box of "G. 
D." caps ; that iron-wood " fish-pole" 
■cut in the thicket on the banks of the 
Maquoketa. 

Poor old Sport ! the mongrel pointer ! 
He was slow, but always sure and faith- 
ful. When he made a point it could 
always be relied upon. 

How fresh in my memory is the first 
day in the woods with that old single 
barrel. It was a beautiful day in 
autumn that father took me with him 
on a squirrel hunt. Game was plentiful 
in those days, and we had been in the 
woods but a short time, when a grey 
flirted his tail at us, and scampered up 
a large white oak. Father pointed him 
out to me, away up in a fork ; I took 
careful aim, pulled the trigger, and at 
the crack of the gun down came my 
first squirrel. He no sooner struck the 
ground, than gathering himself together 
he started up the tree again. Grasping 
my gun by the barrel, I whacked away 
at him with the stock. I missed the 
squirrel, but hit the tree and, of course, 
broke my gun-stock. 

I had some copper wire in my pocket, 
with which father wound the broken 
stock, and I was in shooting trim again. 
From this accident I learned two valu- 
able lessons ; first, how to repair a gun- 
stock in the field ; and second, never to 
use the wrong end of my gun on game, 
unless, compelled to do so in self-de- 
fense. We had a pleasant and success- 
ful day's hunt, taking home with us a 
fine string of pigeons and squirrels. 

This was our first hunt together, but 
not our last. As long as I remained at 
home father was my first choice on all 
shooting and fishing trips. Many a 



happy day we spent together, tramping 
through the old familiar woods after 
squirrels, quail and pheasants, or follow- 
ing the windings of the Masquoketa, 
after ducks and fish. Where is the faith- 
ful old pointer, and that single barrel 
that did me such good service on those 
tramps ? Those equipments of boyhood 
were long ago laid aside, supplanted by a 
double barrel muzzle-loader, shot pouch, 
and powder flask ; they in turn by a 
modern breech-loader. These changes 
were necessary to keep pace with the 
times. 

We are always glad to make the ex- 
change, from an old and worn out equip- 
ment, to a new and improved one, even 
though we retain fond recollections 
of the paraphernalia of our boyhood 
days. What dissatisfied mortals we 
are ! When boys we long to be men, 
with the strength and intellect of 
men ; and when we reach manhood, 
with all its matured powers, true to our 
discontented restless natures, we look 
back with longing for the feelings, emo- 
tions and pleasures of our youth. 

Where is the lover of rod and gun 
who would not prefer to spend a day in 
the old wood, or following the banks of 
the old stream, rather than spend a 
whole week any where else? 

My first chum in out door sports was 

Arthur G. . He was of medium 

height, heavy set, had dark hair and 
eyes ; giving him a predominance of the 
motive temperament; which, in connec- 
tion with his large caution, made him 
slow and careful in acting ; while I was 
impulsive and incautious. This was a 
fortunate combination for me ; as his 
restraining influence held me in check, 
and kept me from doing many care 
and foolish things. G. was slow to 
anger, but had a bad temper when 
thoroughly aroused. As I was always on 
the alert to play him a practical joke, 
I had to be careful not to carry these 
too far. 

I remember once when I got beyond 
the limit. It was a hot day in autumn. 
We had been down the river fishing, and 
on our way back stopped at a big deep 



67 






68 



RECREA TION. 




"AT THE SAME CAST I CAUGHT A FISHING AND HUNTING COMPANION. 



pool, in the bottom of which was a boil- 
ing spring, to rest and quench our thirst. 
G. was always careful of his clothes, 
and had a novel way of drinking from 
a river or spring without soiling them. 
He would place the palms of his hands 
on the sand, in the edge of the water ; 
rest his knees on his kimboed elbows. 



balance nicely in this position, lean 
forward and drink. On this occasion I 
drank first, and was standing behind 
him when he leaned forward. The 
position was too tempting. I gave him 
a gentle push with my foot just to make 
him wet his nose a little. Imagine my 
surprise, to see him lose his balance and 



A NEW DAY. 



69 



go headlong into the drink, like a big 
bull-frog. The look on his face, as he 
came sputtering to the surface, warned 
me to keep out of his way. I did my 
fishing on the other side of the river on 
the way home. 

Arthur G. was a good fellow, a 
natural woodsman, and a successful 
sportsman. We were almost constant 
companions until I married and located 
in another town. The first years of our 
married life I did business in a city 
down in the Mississippi valley ; back 
about 20 miles from the Father of-waters. 
Many a pleasant day's sport have I had 
with gun and dog after pigeons, squir- 
rels and ruffed grouse, among those 
grand old bluffs ; or, following along 
the South Fork, with rod and line, coax- 
ing the bronze-backed beauties out of 
their hiding places, under the great 
shelving rocks that overhung the stream. 

When I would come home at night tired 
but happy, with a nice string of game 

or fish, Mrs. S. would say, ° I do 

not see what you can find so fascinat- 
ing about climbing over those rocks 
all day, for a few fish." 

One lucky evening, I induced my. 
better-half to go with me, casting for 
black bass. Getting no response to my 
casts for the first half hour, she said, 
" I fail to see any pleasure in that," and 
strolled along down the shore picking 
up stones and shells. Making a cast in 
a deep pool at the foot of a rapid, I en- 
ticed a big five pound bass from his 
shady retreat under a shelving rock. 
He made a dash at the spoon, and 
jumped his entire length out of the 
water. Pointing to the place where he 

broke, Mrs. S. exclaimed : " Oh, 

what a big fellow ! do catch him, right 
over there is where he went down." I 



followed her advice, and at the next 
cast hooked the old beauty. At the 
same time I caught a hunting and fishing 
companion. That evening after supper, 
I got down my tackle catalogue and se- 
lected two fine rods, with full equip- 
ments for all kinds of fishing. 

The ordering of those outfits was the 
beginning of a new era of happiness for 
both of us ; and many an enjoyable day's 
sport have we had on lake and stream 
with the rods we chose that evening. 

About three years ago I induced her 
to take up rifle shooting. Her first ef- 
forts were discouraging, as she could 
hardly keep her shots on a 3x4 foot 
target ; but she continued to practice 
daily during the summer, and by fall 
had scores of 87 out of a possible 100 
to her credit ; and now, the squirrel 
that would wink down at her from his 
perch in a tall oak would be likely to 
regret his rashness. 

Time was — and not many years back 
either — when a lady would not dare ac- 
company her husband on a shooting or 
fishing trip. It would be thought very 
unladylike by her friends ; but the 
public mind has changed, and now thou- 
sands of the best women in the land re- 
sort to the fields, the forests, and the 
waters every summer. 

Only a few years ago a man who spent 
a good deal of his time shooting or 
fishing would be classed with the com- 
mon tramp, and if a stranger inquired 
about his standing, some well meaning 
hard working neighbor would say : 
" Oh, he's a purty good feller, but don't 
'mount to much ; spends most of his 
time huntin' and fishin'." 

Those days have past and gone, and 
are among the by-gones that we sports- 
men do not look back to with any regret 



A NEW DAY. 



Frank H. Sweet. 



A pearly, soft, and opalescent sky, 

That gently falls and circles round the sea, 

Low flying gulls, and billows rolling high 
And free. 

Expectant hush ; till from the east a glow 

Proclaims the morn, 
And then the bright, majestic sun — and lo, 

A day is born ! 



7° 



RECREA TION. 




7i 







LUNAR. 



David B. Keeler. 



Oh, fantasma ! Oh, delicious witchery ! 

Illumined in silvered glory 

Of the harvest moon's bright rays, 

Each tiny wavelet, fragrant 

Of the rich salt sea ; 

Each filled with amorous love 

Doth softly lap, with fond caress, 

My yacht, who, like willing maiden 

Receives her lover's kisses. 

This, if ever is the time, 

When Brownies are abroad. 

Methinks I spy them yonder 

In the eel grass, 

On the flood tide's bosom sporting. 

I hear the measured tink-tink, tink-tink, 

Of yacht's bells, time denoting; 

Yet heed I not, 

Intoxicated with August's fairyland. 

Rather far, sit I in solitude 

Drinking in sweet nature, 

Than join the waltzing throng, 

In heated ball-room panting ; 

Yet, dreamy and enchanting, too, 

The distant strains of music wafted ; 

Unreal, too beauteous, methinks, 

For garish day to disenchant ; 

T'is sin to sleep on such a night. 

Reclining on my boat's white deck, 

I smoke and contemplate. 

I note in idle pleasure 

The phosphorescent wake and splash, 

As boat by boat puts out 

From yon grim, night-enshrouded 

Vessels of the fleet, 

Bearing gallant beaux to meet 

The summer girl's bright eyes. 

Soon naught disturbs me ; 

All are gone ; the ghostly groan 

Of straining anchor chains bewilder, 

Yet add, as does the tinkle 

Of a banjo, on a distant vessel strummed, 

To Luna's mighty sway ; 

And thus I smoke, and muse — then sleep. 



72 



RECREA TION. 




"AND THIS TIME THEIR EFFORT IS SUCCESSFUL. 



COURSING WITH THE GREYHOUND. 



L. F. Bartels. 



" The greyhound, the greathound. the graceful of limb, 
Rough fellow, tall fellow, swift fellow and slim ; 
Let them sound o'er the earth, let them sail o'er the sea, 
They will light on none other more ancient than he." 

Scott. 



Among the many different breeds of 
dogs, the greyhound stands out 
boldly, and occupies the highest place 




in the group of those hunting by keen- 
ness of sight and fleetness of foot. 

The greyhound, wolfhound, and deer- 
hound probably sprang from the same 
source. Although the greyhound was 
known in the most remote ages of antiq- 
uity, the first portraiture, which can be 
relied on is in a painting on one of the 
tombs of the fourth dynasty of Egypt, 
which must be upwards of 4000 years 
old. The type of the greyhound has, by 
careful breeding, become fixed and is 
by far more important and perfect than 
that of any other breed. It exhibits a 
model of elegance and combination of 
symmetrical proportions, unrivalled by 
those of any other animal, the perfec- 
tion of the mechanism for speed being 
apparent throughout its structure. 

The alterations in the game laws of 
modern times led to the great and in- 
creasing popularity of coursing and the 
diffusion of greyhoundsamongallclasses. 
It is impossible to separate the grey- 



hound from coursing, so thoroughly 
have they become identified. If we go 
back to the earlier centuries, we find the 
Gauls, who first practiced this sport, and 
the Greeks with whom it was a great 
favorite, using him in the pursuit of the 
wolf, boar, deer and other large game, 
depending upon his speed and endur- 
ance to conquer it. His speed is pro- 
verbial. It is thus eulogized by Scott 
in his introduction to Canto II, Mar 
mion : 

" Remember'st thou my greyhounds true? 
O'er holt or hill there never flew, 
From slip or leash, there never sprang. 
More fleet of foot, or sure of fang." 

Coming down to the present time, 
when the opportunities for coursing the 
larger game became more rare, and in 
many cases was restricted or prohibited 
by the game laws in force, coursing the 
hare, or his American cousin the jack- 
rabbit, grew in favor. With the increas- 
ing popularity of this sport and the 
conditions thereof, came the modern 
greyhound. 




MONK UISHOI". 



Drayton has so well described a course 
of this kind, that I may be pardoned 
for quoting it here : 



73 



74 



RECREA TJON. 












. ^/vTA>—- 



" O'er holt or hill there never flew, 
From slip or leash, there never sprang, 
More fleet of foot, or sure of fang." 



COURSING WITH THE GREYHOUND. 



75 




MONK BISHOP AND BOOMERANG IN SLIPS. 



" The greyhounds forth are brought for cours- 
ing therein case, 

And choicly in the slips, one leadeth forth a 
brace. 

The finder puts her up, and gives her courser's 
law, 

And whilst the eager dogs upon the slip do draw, 

She riseth from her seat, as though on earth she 
flew. 

Forced by some yelping cute to give the grey- 
hounds view, 

Which are at length let slip, when gunning out 
they go, 

As in respect of them, the swiftest wind were 
slow ; 

When each man runs his horse, with fixed eyes 
and notes 

Which dog first turns the hare, which first the 
other cotes ; 

They wrench her once or twice ere she a turn 
will take, 

What's offered by the first, the other good doth 
make ; 

And turn for turn again with equal speed they 

ply, 

Bestirring their swift feet with strange agility. 
A hardened ridge or way, when if the hare do 

win, 
Then as a shot from bow she from the dogs 

doth spin, 
That strive to put her off, but when he cannot 

reach 
This giving him a cote, about again doth fetch 

her, 



To him that comes behind, which seems the 

horse to hear, 
But with a nimble turn she casts them both 

arrear, 
Till, oft for want of breath to fall to ground they 

make her, 
The greyhounds both so spent that they want 

breath to take her." 

No sport can be more enjoyable or 
more exhilarating than to be on a good 
horse, a good stretch of country before 
you, following a good brace of grey- 
hounds, who have just started a hart-. 
What wonderful speed the dogs display 
in overtaking the now fairly flying hare; 
and how nimbly she doubles back, caus- 
ing them to overrun their mark ! Again 
the hounds come up like a whirlwind, 
only to be thrown off once more by a 
sudden turn of the hare, which as yet 
is confident of making good her 
Again and again the hounds overtake 
the hare, only to be as often thrown off 
the scut by her continued turning and 
wrenching. Having thus been repeat- 
edly thrown, the hounds now come up 
with apparently the same great burst of 
speed, but just before reaching the hare, 
slacken their speed, steady them- 



7 6 



R EC RE A TION. 



selves, and now follow each turn and 
wrench with wonderful agility. The 
hounds seem to get their mouths closer 
to the hare and make a drive to kill, 
only to be again cast off. Once more 
they get their noses close to her and this 
time their effort to kill is successful. 
After a turn or two has been made by 
the hare and hounds, your horse has 
fully entered into the sport and endeav- 
ors to follow the line of the course as 
closely as possible, keeping you on the 
alert, watching your seat as well as the 
course. It is a ride like this that gives 
the invalid new lease of life. 

A few minutes breathing spell for 
yourself and horse — (during which time 
the exhausted greyhounds are taken up, 
put into their crate, and a fresh pair put 
down,) the lucky foot and ears having 
been duly presented to the first in at the 
kill, and all are ready for another course. 

As you are riding along leisurely, sur- 
veying the surrounding country, your 
horse suddenly throws up> his head, 
pricks his ears forward -and attracts 
your attention to a cayote sneaking over 
the next hill several hundred yards 
away. The hounds have just got a 
glimpse of him and are off ; when they 
reach the brow of the hill and get a 
good view of the cayote making tracks 
for the next county, they let out another 
link of speed and at once commence to 
close up the gap between them and the 
quarry. After a run of a mile or more 
they reach and trip him. They do not 



seem to be able to hold him and for 
several hundred yards, it is snap, snarl 
and yelp — a regular running fight. At 
last one of the hounds succeeds in get- 
ting a firm hold on the throat, while 
another gets a flank hold ; thus they 
stretch and choke him until life is ex- 
tinct. 

The first rider in at the death claims 
the pelt and at once sets about getting 
it ; which when removed he takes to the 
taxidermist and has mounted or made 
into a rug to ornament his library and 
as a trophy to recall the exciting and 
most enjoyable course. The opportu- 
nities to participate in this grand sport 
are confined principally to those who 
live west of the Mississippi. 

So popular has rabbit coursing be- 
come that clubs for the advancement 
of the sport have been the outgrowth. 
The first club in this country was or- 
ganized in California in 1867, and was 
known as "The California Pioneer 
Coursing Club." Since then many 
clubs have been organized on the Pa- 
cific coast and in the states east of the 
Rockies. Public meetings, under the 
auspices of the different clubs, are now 
held annually in several states ; one 
meeting following another. 

Let us hope that this sport will con- 
tinue to grow in favor and popularity, 
until we may with reason quote the old 
Welsh proverb, " You may know a gen- 
tleman by his horse, his hawk and his 
greyhound." 




A HERO IN THE RANKS. 



Lieut. Alex. T. Dean, U. S. A. 



We often read of a brave deed, 
or an act of courage being per- 
formed by some officer in time of 
war. The gallant conduct of the more 
humble private is too often overlooked ; 
yet, beneath the simple blouse of the 
soldier there often beats the heart of a 
hero. 

The following pathetic incident will 
illustrate this. In the spring of 1882, 
the Apache Indians became restless, on 
their reservation, at San Carlos, Arizona. 
Their savage natures chafed under the 
dull and monotonous life they led at the 
agency. The grass was high enough to 
afford food for their ponies, and the 
braves were waiting for an excuse to 
break from the reservation and go on 
the war-path. 

About this time, the chief of police 
at San Carlos, a man named Stirling, be- 
came involved in a dispute with an 
Indian, a desperate character, and one 
who had been on many a bloody raid 
through Arizona and Mexico. The 
Indian seized a loaded rifle standing 
near, and shot Stirling through the head, 



killing him instantly. Whether this was 
a part of the plot, on the part of the 
Apaches, has never been known, but 
they Avere in a suspicious state of readi- 
ness for flight. 

Instantly, runners were sent from 
camp to camp. The Indians were soon 
in a state of great excitement. The 
bucks commenced to saddle their 
ponies, and the squaws to pack the lead 
horses. Hu and Nana, the two famous 
war chiefs of the Apaches, urged their 
followers to flight, and that night, there 
broke from the reservation of San Carlos 
100 of the most blood-thirsty devils 
that ever bestrode a horse. They were 
fully aimed, well supplied with ammu- 
nition, and were gaudy in war-paint and 
feathers. 

Their time was well chosen. A 
heavy rain had obliterated their trail, and 
by an unbroken march of 60 miles they 
were safe, for the time being, from 
pursuit. 

The troops stationed in the different 
military posts, in Arizona and New 
Mexico, were at once notified, by tele- 




AFACHES AT HOME. 

77 



78 



RECREA 7 ION. 




GERONIMO. 



graph, of the outbreak, and within a few 
hours the cavalry from Forts Huachuca, 
Bowie, Apache and Grant, in Arizona, 
and Forts Bayard and Cummings, in 
New Mexico, were in the field, with the 
prospect of a long and hard Indian 
campaign before them. 

It was believed that the hostiles, fol- 
lowing their usual tactics, would strike 
south for the border, by rapid marches 
cross into old Mexico, and find rest 
and safety in the fastnesses of the 
Sierra Madre mountains, well known to 
them, but rarely penetrated by white 
men. For these reasons, the troops 
marched south toward the Mexican 
line, hoping to intercept the hostiles in 
their attempt to cross. 

Their trail of blood and fire soon 
betrayed them. Their course was 
marked by burning ranches, corpses of 
murdered settlers, and outraged women. 
Four companies of regular cavalry, with 
a large force of Indian scouts, were 
sent by rail, from their camp in the 
field, to San Simon, a little station on 
the Southern Pacific Railroad, in Ari- 
zona. From there the command was 
marched rapidly toward the Stein's 



Peak mountains ; the idea being to 
place it between the hostiles and the 
mountains, and thus bar their passage. 
The Apaches, however, by marching 
night and day, had succeeded in get- 
ting into the mountains in advance of 
the troops, and had taken up an almost 
impregnable position, on a high ridge, 
the only approach to which was through 
a deep canyon, with towering walls, 
several hundred feet high. The Indian 
scouts were directed to strike into the 
range lower down, march parallel to 
the troops, who would keep on the 
road, and try to locate the hostiles. 
During the afternoon of the second 
day's march, a moving object, coming 
from the direction the scouts had taken, 
was seen rapidly approaching the 
column. It proved to be one of the 
Indian scouts. His pony was nearly ex- 
hausted, and blood covered his white 
cotton shirt, from a wound in his 
shoulder. 

By signs and words, he told how the 
scouts had found the trail of the hos- 
tiles, who had their squaws with them, 
and a great many ponies. 

A trail reveals many things to an 
Indian that are hidden from the white 
man. Trail reading is also well devel- 
oped in the Mexican, and to a lesser 
extent in the white frontiersman and 
guide, but it is born in the Apache. 
To tell you how many horses or people 
have passed any point, the number of 
hours that have elapsed since their 
passing, whether the horses were led or 
ridden, their gait, and many other 
things, is easy for him. He can also 
follow a trail so dim that a white man 
could not even see it. It is as an open 
book to him. 

But to return to my story. The 
scout further said that his party had 
been fired upon by the rear guard of 
the hostiles, from ambush ; that four of 
them had been killed, and himself and 
one other of the scouts wounded. 

As soon as the Indian had finished his 
report the cavalry column was headed for 
the mountains, the trumpeters sounded 
the gallop, and as the troopers settled 
down in their saddles, every man of 
them felt that he had started on a ride 
which might be his last. The fluttering 
guidons, the sun reflected from the 
bright accoutrements of horses and men, 
made a stirring picture, but one which 



A HERO IN THE RANKS. 



79 



the actors had no time to admire. Erect 
in their saddles, with set and determined 
faces, they rode on, boot to boot. 

Soon the picture changed; the column 
formed into a long line, and halted. 
Obeying the different commands the 
troopers dismounted to fight on foot, a 
guard being left with the horses, which 
were moved behind an elevation in 
the ground. Now the dismounted line 
moves slowly forward, the men loosen- 
ing the cartridges in their belts, and 
setting their carbine sights. Closer 




A SUB-CHIEF. 

and closer they approach to the low 
foot hills, where the Apaches are ly- 
ing in wait. Not a shot has been 
fired; not an Indian has been seen. 
Now they are only 500 or 600 yards 
from where the hostiles are supposed to 
be, who, outnumbering the soldiers, and 
secure in their strong position, are 
silently awaiting the arrival of soldiers 
in easy range. Unseen themselves, 
they hope then to pour in a murderous 
fire. This stand of theirs gives their 
women and children time to escape on 
their ponies. 



Suddenly, on the extreme right, from 
among the rocks, a puff of white smoke- 
is seen, followed by the ringing report 
of a rifle. A soldier from the ranks 
plunges forward and falls heavily on his 
face — dead. A shudder passes through 
the men nearest him as they close up 
and move on — for some of them have- 
never before met death, face to face. 
The crest of the position held by the 
hostiles, now becomes hidden in smoke. 
The Indians are firing rapidly. For- 
tunately their aim is rather wild. The 
order is now given for the men to fire. 
There is a crack from a hundred car- 
bines, followed by a wild cheer as the 
line sways forward after the volley. 
Now it is every man for himself. Each 
soldier loads and fires at will. The 
Indians can be seen running between 
the rocks and moving higher up the 
mountain side as the soldiers close 
in on them. The fight resolves itself 
into a series of rushes. As fast as the 
hostiles abandon a position it is occu- 
pied by the soldiers. Higher and higher 
up the mountain they go until, a few- 
yards from the crest, they make a final 
stand. There is no time to look after 
fallen comrades now. The two lines 
not over 50 yards apart, are pouring 
lead into each other as fast as they can 
load and fire. On level ground one 
final charge and the fight would be over; 
but here such a charge is impossible. 
The mountain side is so cut up that it 
is difficult for the soldiers to find a foot- 
hold. The Indians have set fire to the 
underbrush and the men are nearly 
blinded by the smoke — the wind carry- 
ing it into their faces. It is growing 
darker every minute. The hostiles 
reach the top of the mountain when, 
abondoning their dead, all their provis- 
ions and camp outfit, they scatter in all 
directions, in the darkness, to come to- 
gether again, perhaps day sand weeks 
hence, a hundred miles over the line in 
old Mexico, where they will join their 
women and children. 

The trumpets now sound the recall. 
The fight is over and the soldiers march 
back to their horses. Everything left 
by the hostiles is burned and the 
wounded are tenderly carried on hastily 
improvised litters Several men are 
desperately wounded, but they will die a 
soldier's death. They have done then- 
duty. Among them is a mere lad. one who 



8o 



RECREA T/OJV. 



had run away from his California home 
and, against the wishes of his old mother, 
had enlisted in the cavalry. How proud 
he felt that day on going into his first 
Indian fight. He had promised himself 
that on his return to his post he would 
write to his mother. How proud she 
would be of him ! He would tell her 
of his part in the fight — how he had 
done his duty and been praised by his 
captain for brave conduct. How it 
would make her dear old heart beat 
with pride for her boy. But now — with 
a bullet through his lungs, his face 
drawn and white from suffering, his life 
blood ebbing from his breast, he lay 
slowly dying. No more would he know 
his mother's kiss : his sister's gentle 
voice or the happy home. 

As the surgeon passed among the 
wounded, he paused before the suffering 
t>oy, and saw that the hand of death had 
touched him, that his life could be 
counted by minutes. Bending over the 
young soldier, he told him that he had 
but a few minutes to live, -and that if he 
had anything to say he must speak 
quickly. The brave lad said : 

"Tell them at home that I died like 
a soldier ; that I have done my duty." 
of death crossed his 
few minutes he was 



pallor 
in a 



The gray 
face and 
dead. 

A plain rough slab of native sand- 
stone is all that marks his lonely grave, 
away^out there in the treeless foot-hills, 
but it bears this inscription, rudely cut 
by a loving comrade : 

" Here lies a boy who did his duty 
.and who died like a soldier." 



When lovely woman stoops to folly, 
And eats a watermelon that is not ripe, 

"What charm can soothe her melancholy ? 
What potion ease her fearful gripe? 



how big a 



" Father," said Johnny Ironside, 
fish did you ever catch ?" 

" I caught a catfish once, Johnny," replied 
Deacon Ironside, " that weighed " 

The good man stopped short, looked fixedly 
at his youngest son, and resumed in an altered 
tone — 

" John, this is Sunday." — Youngstozun {Ohio) 
Vindicator. 



America has no Shakespeare yet, 
No epic bard of deathless lay; 

But on the baseball grounds, you bet, 
A homer's made most every day. 

— Indianapolis Journal. 



OUR CONTRIBUTORS. 

XII. 

Judge C. W. Hinman, of Schoharie, N. V., 
has had an eventful career. When 27 years old 
(August, 1862), he enlisted as a private in the 
134th M. S. V. The regiment was composed of 
volunteers from Schoharie and Schenectady 
counties. He was promoted to First Lieutenant, 
was captured and served the last six months of 
his term in Andersonville Prison, being released 




after Lee surrendered. He returned to Scho- 
harie a skeleton, recuperated at home, com- 
menced the study of law, was admitted to the 
bar in 18 months, and has been practicing 
law there ever since. His only recreation is 
shooting and fishing, and in these he has had a 
wide experience. His tastes are simple; he uses 
old-fashioned tackle, but never gets left when he 
goes after bass or trout. He says, " I shoot on 
the wing, for which the birds give me thanks." 
His friends, however, account him one of the 
best wing shots in the state, and say he seldom 
misses a bird that any other man could kill. As 
a writer he is full of droll and quaint humor. 
His stories deal mostly with field sports of 40 or 
50 years ago, but have a charm and a freshness 
about them that carry us all back to our boyhood 
days. Several of his delightful reminiscences 
are in reserve for the readers of Recreation. 



Diamond Pond, in Colebrook, N. H., although 
made famous more than twenty years ago by 
Wm. C. Prime, in his "I go a Fishing," is still 
an excellent fishing ground. Mr. George W. 
Gladwin, of New York, during a recent trip in 
that neighborhood, made a large catch of trout 
there, both as regards the size and number of 
fish. It is reached from either Boston or Spring- 
field, via. the B. & M. R. R. 



CLEVER BOY SHOOTERS. 



Si 




In the picture is shown 
the skin of the bear and 
the head of the second 
deer. The boy of course 
values both trophies 
highly, and will always 
cherish them as memen- 
toes of his early days in 
the woods. 

He uses a 32 calibre 
Winchester carbine, 
weighing 54 pounds, 
with which he does some 
fine work on small ob- 
jects. " I have," says 
a neighbor of his, " seen 
him shoot off partridges' 
heads in a way that would 
do credit to any of the 
crack shots in the 
country." 



CLEVER BOY SHOOTERS. 
VIII. 

Merchant Phelps, of Spring Cove, N. Y., is 
only 12 years old, but has had some lively experi- 
ences in hunting. He commenced shooting with 
a rifle when about 7 years old. When 11 years 
of age, he brought down his first deer. He and 
a friend went out in a boat one night, with a 
jack light. Merchant carried the jack on his 
head. They had been out about an hour when, 
on rounding a point of land, the deer was seen 
standing in the lake, a few feet from shore. 
Merchant brought the rifle to his shoulder, took 
careful aim at the deer's head, and fired. The 
deer made one leap, and fell dead with a broken 
neck. Since then the young hunter has killed 
fcur more in the same way. 

He hunted with a party of sportsmen from 
Boston during the open season of 1894. A prize 
was offered for the hunter who should kill the 
largest deer. Merchant earned the prize, a silken 
flag, by killing a four prong buck, which weighed 
over 200 pounds. 

^ During the same summer, in which he killed 
his first deer, he had an opportunity to try his 
hand on still larger game. While out in the 
woods with his rifle, one day, he met a large 
black bear. Without thinking of the trouble a 
wounded bear might give him, he instantly fired 
two shots at Bruin in rapid succession. Both 
bullets took effect, one entering the neck and the 
other penetrating the brain. 



Spirit Lake, Iowa. 
Editor Recreation. 

In your splendid mag- 
azine I notice many in- 
teresting articles from 
various points in the 
north-west, but have 
never seen our beautiful 
lake region represented. 
Here, in a space 12 miles 
square lie a dozen lakes, 
as pretty as any in the 
country. Some of these 
are detached, ha\ingno 
outlet during the summer and fall, but in 
the spring all have a common outlet, viz. : the 
Little Sioux river, which empties into the Mis- 
souri, near Sioux City, la. " Spirit Lake Town." 
as the resorters call our city of 1,200 people, is 
pleasantly situated about the geographical centre 
of the group, and is the base of supplies for 
scores of pretty summer homes, which stand em- 
bowered in groves of giant oaks, back of the 
many miles of sandy beach in every direction. 
These cottages, many of which are quite expen- 
sive, are owned by business and professional 
men of Des Moines, Sioux City, Cedar Rapids, 
Burlington, Dubuque, Davenport, Omaha, Lin- 
coln, and other cities. 

There is no finer prairie chicken country out 
of doors than this. Then we have myriads of 
geese, ducks and swan, in spring and fall ; many 
of these water fowl hatching and rearing their 
broods in unfrequented places, about the smaller 
lakes. 

As to fish. I have a photo, of a 20 pound 
" 'lunge" caught here in January, 1895, and one 
caught during the same month, one each oi 
16, j 3, and several of 10 pounds each. Our 
perch, pike and bass run from S pounds down, 
and the supply seems unlimited. 

Fred. Phii i lps. 



Show Recreation to your friends and .isk- 
them to subscribe for it. They will thank you 
ever after for calling their attention to it. In no 
other way can they get so much comfort for a 

dollar. 



82 



RECREATION. 










DUCKING ON THE NINNESCAH. 

Wichita, Kan. 
Editor Recreation. 

On the morning of March 12, Mr. Fred. 
Baldwin, Wichita's expert photogiapher, and an 
ardent lover of the rod and gun, and your hum- 
ble servant boarded a train for the shooting 
grounds of the Wichita Rod and Gun Club, 
located on the upper Ninnescah river, in Pratt 
county, 75 miles northwest of Wichita. As the 
train sped on, dark and lowering clouds gathered 



in the west, and occasional spots of rain dashed 
against the windows ; auguring good weather 
for ducks, but not so pleasant for the hunters. 
The road runs parallel with the river for miles 
and, at times, as we come close to it, a bunch of 
ducks would get up and pull for other quarters. 
When our train finally slowed up, and the oblig- 
ing conductor assisted us off with our traps, we 
found ourselves within 10 minutes' walk of the 
club house. After partaking of a hastily impro- 
vised lunch, we gathered up the decoys, guns, 
etc., loaded them into the boat and pulled for 



DUCKING ON THE NINNESCAH. 



83 



the lake. En route we quietly ascended a steep 
bluff and took a survey of the lake, and " great 
Caesar, look at the ducks," burst from the lips of 
my friend. It was really a sight to quicken the 
blood of a sportsman. There, right in front of 
us, bunched on the water and on a bar near the 
shore, were at least a 1000 ducks. The bank at 
that point was high, and we could easily have 
approached them within 40 yards, and how we 
could have " mowed them !" What a pic-nic it 
would have been for a pot hunter; but we did not 
go for that kind of shooting. 

We were now assured of good sport and, on 
reaching the pass, got the decovs out and took 
to the blinds where we had fair shooting till 
dark ; but the majority of the ducks were sprig 
tails. Not having any decoys of that kind and 
the other ducks flying high, we did not do as 
well as we had anticipated. 

During the evening a light snow commenced 
falling, and before midnight a howling Kansas 
blizzard was on in full force. We hustled all 
the blankets the club owned, and wished for 
more — filled the stove full of coal and tried to 
sleep ; but between thinking of the ducks, and 
being nipped by the extreme cold, we didn't sleep 
much. We got up before daylight, built a rous- 
ing fire, had a red hot breakfast, and after that 
felt equal to any weather. 

We donned our shooting traps and made a bee 
line for the lake. We could hear the musical 
"quack" of the ducks, going over us, but it 
was yet too dark to shoot. We soon reached 
the lake and, to our great surprise, found it frozen 
over, solid, from end to end. We were not 
aware it had been so cold, but learned, later, that 
the mercury had reached 10 degrees below zero. 
We took to the blinds, but soon found that we 
ducks gave us the go by and 
the river, where there was open 
teal came along, which fell to 
then, being stiff with the cold, 
for the river, where we had 
sport, and only regretted not 
retriever, as we lost a number of 
ducks in the tall and thickly matted grass. Our 
shooting was mainly on singles and small 
bunches, getting up out of the bends of the river. 
In the evening I came to a small pond of open 
water, fed by a spring, and only a short distance 
from the club house, where I had the best sport 
of the day. I shot till the ducks looked like big 
blotches of ink floating before my eyes. Then 
I thought it time to quit, and shouldering my 
gun and ducks I made a short cut for the house, 
but came to grief in crossing a pond. The ice 
broke and I went into the water over my hip 
boots. With the ducks and gun to manage I 
had a tussle to get out, but finally reached the 
house. I was tired, wet and cold, but well 
satisfied with the day's shoot. 

My friend was there, had a good hot supper 
ready, and I assure you the commissary was 
considerably depleted by the time we had 
filled up. 

We lost no time in getting to sleep that night, 
and left for home on the early train in the morn- 
ing with 75 ducks and one goose. Mr. Bald- 
win photographed the string and I send you a 
copy of the picture herewith. I think you will 
seldom see a better record of a day's shooting. 

A. W. Bitting. 



were left. The 
followed along 
water. A few 
our guns, and 
we pulled out 
a grand day's 
having a good 



It is my painful duty to announce the death of 
another of my best friends, Major William H. 
Schieffelin, author of the series of articles now 
being published in Recreation, under the title 
of " Across the Rockies in '61." He died at his 
home in New York, on the 21st of June, at the 
age of 59 years. He had been an invalid ever 
since the close of the war, and for some weeks 




preceding his death had been confined to his 
room. The immediate cause of his death was 
gastritis. 

Major Schieffelin was one of the most genial, 
kind-hearted, sympathetic, and, in every way. 
lovable men, it has ever been my good fortune 
to know. All who knew him loved him. 
To me he was like a brother. He took 
me into his confidence at our first meeting, and 
ever after gave me sympathy, valuable ad- 
vice and kindly assistance. Only three days 
before his death he wrote me a letter, re- 
questing me to visit his father, and expressing 
feelings of tender interest and regard, such as 
are rare in this matter-of-fact world. 1 shall 
always feel the loss of so generous and valued a 
friend as Major Schieffelin. 



Marysvale, Jacksons Hole, Wyo. 
Have just returned from a two weeks' camp- 
ing trip on the west side of Snake river. S. I 
Adams camped with me part of the time. He 
put out one bear trap, went to it twice, and got 
a bear each time. So far I have heard of 11 
bear being caught near here this spring. While 
at work across the river I could see small 
bunches of elk almost every day, and by going 
out of the timber a short distance, on the tlat, 
could see antelope at anytime. Game wintered 
well last season and there will be great shooting 
here this fall, O. I '. BlKR. 




i 



0F JFJIE flMECg. 



Dr. Edward J. Tucker. 



CHAPTER VI. 



CAIN AND ABEL. 



I sank into a chair appalled. They 
have abandoned me and wished me to 
sell them the farm so that it could be 
kept in the family. I read the cruel 
lines over, and placing my aching head 
between my hands endeavored to pene- 
trate their reason for treating me in 
such a" shameful manner, but could not 
fathom the mystery. Suddenly I started 
to my feet. 

" Heavens," I cried; "The build- 
ings have been shut up for a week, with 
no one to attend to the live stock." I 
rushed to the stable. The door was 
locked. I pounded on the door and 
shouted, but not the faintest sound 
could I hear. Running around the end 
of the barn to the kennel I found my 
worst fears realized. My setter, pointer, 
and cocker spaniel were dead from star- 
vation. Returning to the house I got 
the keys, hastened back to the barn, and 
with trembling hands unlocked the 
door. On entering I stumbled over the 
dead body of a horse ; the broken head- 
piece told the story of the poor beast's 
sufferings plainer than words. Desper- 
ate with hunger and thirst he had broken 

*Continued from page 40. 



from its fastenings and had tried in vain 
to beat down the door that held him a 
prisoner. 

Kneeling beside the poor, stricken 
animal with tears in my eyes, I took its 
head in my lap. As I did so it opened 
its eyes a moment and immediately 
closed them. Springing to my feet I 
seized a couple of pails and running to 
the pump filled them with water. On 
the way back I found a large sponge 
used for washing down the horses. I 
dipped this in the water, and forcing 
open the horse's mouth, inserted the 
sponge. I then dashed the remain- 
ing contents of the pails over its body, 
and repeated the operation until I saw 
it revive. In the meantime I looked 
into another stall and found the mare 
and her colt dead. Robert le Diable 
was not in the stable, and I concluded 
he was still at the veterinary's. Fur- 
ther examination disclosed the fact that 
the cows were dead and the hogs in a 
dying condition. The chickens having 
a large open yard, had flown over the 
wire-netting and had managed to pick 
up a living. 

Choking with rage at the devastation 
that had been wrought during my ab- 
sence, I determined that Steve should 



84 



G UA TEMO TZIN. 



85 



answer for the ruin for which he alone 
was responsible. I then started to town, 
after leaving plenty of feed and water 
for the horse. 

I remember reading in one of Sir 
Walter Scott's novels the remark of a 
judge as he pronounced the sentence of 
death on a drover who had murdered a 
companion. 

"I cannot," said the judge, " admit 
the plea of emotional insanity ; as the 
evidence shows that after your compan- 
ion inflicted the blow upon you, you ran 
half a mile to where your outfit was sta- 
tioned, got the knife with which you 
committed the deed, and running back 
to the tavern you plunged the knife into 
the side of your friend. Now, I hold 
you could not accomplish a fraction of 
the distance without regaining your bal- 
ance of mind and realizing what you in- 
tended to do. I can find no extenuating 
circumstances in the provocation ; there- 
fore, I sentence you to death." 

Now that judge may have been right, 
theoretically ; practically I do not be- 
lieve he was, as I walked the two miles 
to Wilkesbarre without knowing how I 
accomplished it, nor did I know what 
I was to do or say when I found my 
brother and father. My mind was in a 
chaotic condition, and through the mass 
of matter that surged through my brain, 
the dominating idea was that my father 
and brother were trying to ruin me, and 
for some inexplicable reason were en- 
deavoring to obtain possession of the 
farm. 

Through all the mental aberration I 
was laboring under, I was dimly con- 
scious I would find Steve at Jessie 
Sheldon's, and mechanically I turned 
down the well known street. 

As I passed the church I raised my 
eyes and sure enough saw Jessie sit- 
ting on the lower step of the stoop with 
Steve, while father and Mr. Sheldon sat 
on the upper step, all evidently enjoying 
the fine September evening. I fully ex- 
pected to find them there, yet the sight 
goaded me to madness, and before I 
was aware of my action, I made one 
stride forward and stood like a spectre 
before Steve. Jessie gave a slight ex- 
clamation at seeing me, and, indeed I 
must have been a sight horrifying to 
contemplate. 

My clothes were old and travel- 
stained. My hair unkempt and my face 



convulsed with jealousy, love, hate and 
despair, while Steve sat calm and un- 
moved. 

Slowly they rose to their feet. I was 
unable to articulate, and Steve broke the 
silence first. 

"Well, sir!" he exclaimed. "You 
appear in a most unceremonious man- 
ner. Have you come to call us to ac- 
count for our determination to work for 
ourselves and not for another without 
pay?" 

"Wretch!" I hissed in his face. 
" Why did you sneak off in the night 
when I was absent from home ? Why 
did you discharge the farm hands and 
lock up the stock to die of starvation ?" 

"What do you mean ? " 

" Mean," I shrieked, in a paroxysm of 
rage. "I mean that all the cattle are 
dead ; the hogs are dead ; the mare and 
colt are dead, and my dogs are dead — 
all from starvation. The devastation at 
the farm is as great if a pestilence had 
struck it. You know it was not unusual 
for me to absent myself from home 
weeks at a time. I returned only to-day 
and find everything ruined." 

" Well," answered Steve, coldly. " 1 
fail to see how you presume to hold me 
accountable for any loss the farm may 
have sustained through your negligence; 
you surely cannot expect us to work 
for you forever without compensation." 

I laughed in a hysterical manner. 
"Compensation," I cried, pointing to 
him and then to myself; "pray, have 
you not always pocketed the proceeds 
of the farm, and have I ever received 
one cent in the way of rent or profit? 
But never mind, Mr. Farrington has 
promised to see this through for me and I 
will require a strict accounting from 
you both." 

I noted the lightning-like glances that 
flashed between Steve and my father. I 
turned and walked a few steps toward the 
village, when Steve approached and said. 

"Allen, I am very sorry about the 
stock and your dogs, but we fully ex- 
pected you home that night. You never 
seemed to care for the farm and alw 
desired to study medicine; if you still 
wish to do so, name your price for the 
farm, including the stock that lias died." 

I gazed at him a moment in surprise 
and answered with a sneer. 

" Where did you get so much money? 
Was it from the proceeds of the farm ? 



86 



RECREA TION. 



There are other things I value more 
than the farm that you are robbing me 
of. Money will not heal the wound or 
compensate for my loss. You are aware 
to what I refer ; so promise me, if fight 
we must, it will be a fair, open fight, and 
you may have the farm." 

Regarding me a moment with bitter 
scorn and hate, he turned on his heel 
and left me. L was about to proceed 
down the street when Jessie stepped 
over and laid her hand lightly on my 
arm. 

"Allen," she said, " I have not known 
you long, and until the other day I was 
not aware you two were brothers. Why 
this fact was concealed from me I do 
not know, nor do I know much of the 
quarrel between you, your brother and 
your father. What little I have seen, 
and the fact that your nearest relatives 
are arrayed against you, indicate that 
you are in the wrong. You are of a 
vindictive, sullen nature, brooding over 
imaginary wrongs, and magnifying real 
wrongs, until they loom before you in 
imagination, and appear to surpass 
the unforgiven sin. Come, you are 
surgeon enough to know a sharp knife 
makes a quick cure " 

" Yes," I replied, bitterly. " A sharp 
knife cuts deeper than a dull one." 

The color left her face and then 
slowly returned until a deep crimson 
suffused her clear, transparent skin. 
Her voice slightly trembled as she 
replied. 

11 Nay, friend, I have no wish to 
wound you unnecessarily, but you 
brothers are so like Cain and Abel 
there is no telling where this feud will 
end." 



" In your estimation I am the Cain. 
Well, it only needed this bitterness to 
complete my woe." 

Could I have analyzed my sensations 
as I stood listening to her pleading for 
Steve, I would have found nothing but 
murderous hate for the brother who had 
robbed me of the fairest being this 
world contained. My countenance, al- 
ways an index of my mind, spoke the 
grief, love, hate and despair that tore 
my soul. A look of pity lighted the fair 
face before me, and again laying her 
hand on my arm, she said. 

" Indeed, I am sorry for you, Allen ; 
but you must remember you are big and 
strong, while your brother is weak. He 
is of a forgiving nature and will readily 
overlook any wrong you may have 
done him. He has already offered to 
atone for the loss of your animals, if in- 
deed, he is to blame/' 

" There is a loss he can never atone 
for. Is it nothing," I cried, passion- 
ately ; " that when I confessed to you 
it was my fault you sprained your ankle; 
that when my boorish manner so griev- 
ously offended you, he betrayed me to 
you, listened to your abuse of me and 
concealed the fact that I was his brother, 
and all this, after I had compelled him 
to go to your assistance?" 

" I did not mean to stir your evil 
blood," she answered, coldly. 

" No," I said, somewhat hysterically. 
" If what I said related to me only, you 
could listen readily enough." 

"You are unreasonable," she replied, 
drawing herself up proudly. " And I 
will bid you good day." 

With a groan I turned and walked 
rapidly away. 



TO BE CONTINUED. 



When ripening is the early fruit 
And solar fires begin to glow, 

The maid her handsome bathing suit 
No more goes to the beach to show. 

The surf no more she paddles in, 

That's not the modern maiden's way; 

Along the road she takes a spin 
Her pretty bloomers to display. 

— Boston (Mass.) Courier. 



THE GREAT SPORTSMAN'S EXPOSITION. 



Continued from page 37. 



Tatham Bros. , New York, had a small edition 
of their shot tower at work in the garden, giving 
an object lesson in the making of shot. It was 
a great source of pleasure and instruction to all 
who saw it. Every well regulated family should 
have a shot tower in it, but some of us ordinary 
millionaires, like the Gould's, the Vanderbilts 
and myself, can't afford them. We are, there- 
fore, much obliged to Tatham Bros, for allow- 
ing us to see the old thing at work, without 
going away down to Pearl street. 

And speaking of Winchesters reminds me 
that my old friend, Major Albee, borrowed a lot 
of guns and things from the Winchester factory, 
at New Haven, and brought them down, just to 
show the boys what they mean " away down 
east," when they talk about good work. Among 
the guns were repeating and single shot rifles, of 
22 up to 50 caliber, some of them gold plated 
and engraved until they were worth about $5 an 
ounce ; but most of them built for business. 
Then there were repeating shot guns in such a 
variety of trimmings as to fit any kind of a 
taste. Among the "things" referred to above, 
there was a rapid fire cannon, of about 2-inch 
bore and a slab of steel, about four inches thick, 
with a lot of holes in it, that Major Albee said 
had been made with this cannon, fie even 
showed me the six pound steel slugs that he said 
had been driven through this slab of steel. If 
I didn't know the Major mighty well I would be 

tempted to but, come to think of it, I guess 

I would better not. Along in the 6o's I used to 
get behind a tree whenever the firing com- 
menced ; but a tree would be no protection from 
that long, sharp pointed projectile. A good 
sized mountain is about the only thing that would 
stop it. 

The Winchester Company also showed a fine 
line of revolvers, and of rifle and shot gun 
cartridges. Its ad. is on the last page of 
Recreation's overcoat. Write and get one of 
its catalogues. It is as necessary in a sports- 
man's family as a dictionary is. 



TheU. S. Cartridge Company, Lowell, Mass., 
made one of the most novel and attractive ex- 
hibits in the garden. It consisted of a log 
cabin, furnished and fitted as a hunter's home, 
and containing many trophies of the chase, such 
as mounted heads, skins, birds, etc. Cordial 
greeting was given to all visitors by Col. C. W. 
Dimmock, and he was assisted in the greeting 
business by a bunch of old time hunters and guides 
from the various game centres of the United 
States. There were Ira Dodge, Cora, Wyo. ; 
Jonathan Darling and Joe Francis, of Maine ; 
W. H. Wright, Missoula, Mont.; J. H. Schultz, 
Kipp, Mont. ; H. H. Covey, from the Adiron- 
dacks, and others. The United States Cartridge 
Company prepared and distributed, among its 
visitors, a beautifully illustrated souvenir en- 
titled, " Hunting Regions and How to Reach 
Them." If you were not at the show you can 
probably get a copy of this little book by writing 
to the company as above. 



The five cycloramic hunting scenes in the east 
end of the Garden, were designed and prepared 
by Frederic S. Webster, the well known pro- 
fessional taxidermist and naturalist, and were 
studied with deep interest by all visitors. 

Group No. 1 embodied a scene from the 
Western wilds. The season is winter, and a 
fresh fall of snow covers the ground. An Eastern 
sportsman has killed his first elk after a long hunt. 

Group No. 2 leads to the marshes the sports- 
man who loves duck shooting. Though the 
style of pursuit may not spice of action and dan- 
ger, it is full of anticipation and pleasure for the 
experienced duck shooter. 

Group No. 3 represents a chapter in the life 
of every lover of field sports. The temporary 
camp fire, built by the old fox hunter on a 
wooded slope, is slowly dying out. Beside him 
is his faithful companion of many hunting days (a 
fox hound), a scarred old veteran. The two 
dead foxes tell the story of the day's work. 

Group No. 4 is intended to picture an experi- 
ence of the fisherman. The cool chattering 
stream, from which a plump trout of two pounds 
has been taken, was a deception produced with 
charming effect. 

A common experience of the sportsman was 
portrayed by Group No. 5. The hunter has been 
shooting ruffed grouse, when the signs of deer 
are discerned. A report from the gun has 
jumped the buck at the instant when the gun is 
empty. The shooter has bagged the grouse, but 
lost the buck. 

Mr. N. Spering, of Philadelphia, loaned a 
valuable collection of old arms, which were ex- 
amined with deep interest by hundreds of per- 
sons interested in the development of the gun, 
from the invention of gunpowder to the present 
day. 

Fred. Sauter, taxidermist, 3 North William 
street, N. V., exhibited a series of groups of 
mounted wild animals that displayed a j 
deal of skill and ingenuity. Among the groups 
these were especially noticeable : 

" Pursuers and Pursued."— A scene from 
the Black Forest of Germany, in which a pack of 
seven great boar hounds have overtaken their 
quarry for the final struggle. 

" An Unexpected Attack." — Represented 
a Virginia deer under the claws of two mountain 
lions, the largest of the cat tribe indigenoi 
America. 

"A Fight to the Death." — Showing a 
black bear and mountain lion, engaged in a 
struggle for the prey which has fallen victim to 
the craft of the one, or the cunning of the other. 

"A Family Affair." — Introducing the 
spectator to a group of grizzly bears and cubs. 

" Reynard at Home." — A family group of 
foxes, old and young. 

" Nearing the Knd."— Showing a pack of 
thirteen wolves about to pull down an 
hausted old buffalo bull, was one of the finest 
pieces in Mr. Saur's splendid collection. 

To be continued. 



S7 



88 



RECREA TWN. 



THE BLAKE RIFLE. 

A new rifle has recently been constructed and 
submitted to a series of severe tests by the in- 
ventor, Mr. John H. Blake, who now announces 
his readiness to build them to order. Of this 
rifle he says : 

It is designed for a high grade sporting rifle for 
practical use in the fields or the mountains ; the first 
consideration being a solid breech action, one that will 
"hold up" under the enormous chamber pressure 
developed by smokeless rifle powder in projecting the 
bullet at the high muzzle velocity now required to 
give the flattest possible trajectory. 

To accomplish this the general idea of the famous 
Sharps action has been followed, that of supporting 
the strain of the chamber pressure, developed by the 
explosion of the charge, immediately in rear of the 



A distinctive feature of the system is that the car- 
tridges may be carried in the belt or pockets, in a re- 
volving cylindrical packet, holding generally seven 
cartridges; the small cut (Fig. 2) showing an empty 
packet, seven cartridges, and a filled packet. These 
packets are charged into the magazine, which lies. 
under the receiver and just forward of the trigger 
guard, in one movement and " en bloc," as if the 
packet were a single cartridge. The cartridges are 
fed into the chamber by a positive movement, dis- 
pensing with the magazine spring. When the car- 
tridge packet is empty, the magazine door at the side 
of the receiver is opened, the empty packet drops out, 
and a full packet is recharged. An empty packet may 
be refilled with cartridges many times, if desired ; the 
packet weighs less than two ounces, and can be fur- 
nished for a few cents. 

The rifle holds eight cartridges : one in the chamber, 
and seven in the magazine. Two more packets may be 
carried in a vest pocket, which would give a supply of 




base of the cartridge. In the Sharps, which was a 
single shot action, the vertical sliding wedge was used, 
but in the Blake action, to conform to the requirements 
of a repeater, the bolt action with double locking lugs 
at the extreme front end, is employed. These lugs are 
symmetrically placed on opposite sides of the bolt, are 
theoretically and mechanically correct, and constitute 
the most solid locking device ever put into a repeater. 

The next feature considered is the extraction of the 
empty shell after the charge is fired. To accomplish 
this two extractors are employed,' one a powerful 
spring extractor, the other a positive device which 
surely starts the shell for the first eighth of an inch, 
although both pull at the start. The empty shell is 
thrown to the right and away from the operator. 

Simplicity is next considered, the number of parts 
being elemental, and when the bolt action is removed 



22 cartridges. If it be thought desirable to carry more 
cartridges, more packets may be carried in the pockets, 
or in loops on the cartridge belt, as those now in use, 
the loops merely being larger. A belt would hold 49. 
cartridges in packets, and 30 in single loops. 

Positive feed of cartridges in magazine is employed, 
avoiding the use of a magazine spring for the purpose. 
This is a great convenience in loading, and reduces lia- 
bility of disablement. The positive feed enables the full 
strength of the operator to be used in feeding the 
cartridges in front of bolt, ready on its forward move- 
ment to be pushed into the chamber of the barrel, and 
avoids the dependence on a weak spring. Barrel and 
receiver may be removed from the stock in three 
minutes by the use of a screw-driver, and the arm may 
be packed in an ordinary trunk. It may be mounted 
in the same time. 

Single cartridges may be charged into the packet 
or magazine at any time, or the charged packet may 
be instantly removed. It is claimed that the bolt action, 
with handle at the side, as employed in this rifle, aside 
from its simplicity, strength, and lightness, is superior 
to a finger lever in rapidity, and in power to put in and 
take out cartridges from the chamber. It certainly 
takes up less room, leaves the grip perfectly clear of 
any obstructions, and can be worked in a more confined 
space. The seven shots in magazine can be fired with- 
out taking the arm from the shoulder. A Lyman 
sight is fitted to the cocking piece. 




from the receiver, which can be done almost instantly, 
the breech is open, so that the bore and grooves of the 
barrel can be readily examined and cleaned. The 
breech mechanism can be taken apart and a new main 
spring and extractor, or firing pin, substituted and 
replaced in 40 seconds. 

Next in order I have considered a magazine system 
with a good reserve, a positive feed, and that can be 
instantly refilled. 

This rifle, by the use of a " cut off," can be used as 
a rapid single loader, with magazine holding seven 
cartridges in reserve, available as a repeater whenever 
the cut off is thrown in. Single loading fire can be re- 
sumed at any time, holding the remaining cartridges in 
packet in reserve. As a repeater the sustained rapidity 
of fire is probably greater than that of any known rifle, 
being 42 shots a minute. The loading being done 
from the cartridge belt, and not from a table, as in most 
of the high speed tests. 



The rifle is made in two calibers, the .30 caliber U. S. 
Army, and .236 caliber U. S. Navy, both of which may 
be obtained of any of the cartridge companies, or at 
any army or navy station. 

The .30 caliber cartridge is supplied loaded with 
smokeless rifle powder, giving a muzzle velocity to 
the cupro-nickel jacket 220 grain bullet of 2,000 feet 
per second, and a chamber pressure of about 20 tons 
to the square inch. 

The .236 caliber, with smokeless rifle powder, gives 
2,500 feet velocity to the jacketed 135 grain bullet, and 
a chamber pressure of about 25 tons to the square inch. 

Both cartridges are supplied, also, loaded with 55 
grains black powder and jacketed bullets, which makes- 
a good charge for target work and for small game. 

The .30 caliber cartridge is supplied with smokeless 
rifle powder and half mantled bullets with soft lead or 
express points. All lead bullets, alloy about 10 to 1 can 
also be used. Reloading tools are furnished. The 
rifle is built to order in several grades, with length of 
barrel, length and drop of stock to suit. The barrels 
are of nickel steel, the receiver and action also being 
of a superior grade of steel. Weight of rifle with 26- 



THE WHITE GOAT IN EVIDENCE. 



89 



inch barrel, about 7% pounds. The recoil is light. 
The type of this rifle is that of the revolving packet 
multiple loader, original in this arm, and should be 
distinguished from the flat packet, spring feed system 
whether of the vertical, side, or circular feed pattern. 




Fig 2. 

The mechanical features of the system allow that 
grace of outline in the completed arm so much desired 
by sportsmen who wish a handsome gun." 

Mr. J. H. Blake, 136 Liberty street. New York, is 
now ready to fill orders for his repeating hunting 
rifle, using full charges of smokeless rifle powder. 



THE WHITE GOAT IN EVIDENCE. 

Charles H. Kingsbury. 

In October last I faced Westward for a little 
recreation in the mountains. Leaving Chicago 
in the evening, a most comfortable night's ride 
landed me in St. Paul, at daybreak, convincing 
me that the claim of the C, M. & St. P. to run 
the finest train out of Chicago, is valid. Per- 
haps the explanation of such satisfactory service 
is in the fact that the road owns and operates its 
own sleepers and dining cars, which are provided 
with every luxury known to modern railway 
travel, even to a system of electric lighting, de- 
vised and patented by one of its officers. 

The scarcity of big game in Minnesota has led 
to the enactment of a law prohibiting the killing 
of moose, elk and caribou till 1898 ; but I saw 
many carcasses of deer at St. Paul, the majority 
of them does, which had been killed for market. 
Here is the secret of the rapid disappearance of 
our game Every one knows the history of the 
destruction of the buffalo, and skin hunters and 
game butchers have been busy, in and out of 
season, ever since. If not checked they will soon 
complete the extermination of every other 
species. Now let Minnesota, and every state in 
the Union, prohibit the sale of all game and it 
will be many years before it will again be neces- 
sary to prohibit all shooting. The " noble red 
man" hunting off his reservation is another active 
agent in the work of destruction. He should be 
forced to stay at home and should be taught that 
he has no rights superior to those of the white 
man, when he breaks the game laws. 

The game I sought never did live in a plains 
country. The white goat and the big horn 
sheep belong to the mountains of the Northwest; 
and there, too, other large game can yet be 
found, in a few localities in fair numbers. From 
St. Paul across prairie and mountain to the tide 
waters of the Pacific, stretches the Great North- 
ern Railway — the shortest line across the conti- 
nent Its easy grades and fine equipment 
appeal to the practical man of affairs whose busi- 
ness or inclination leads him to seek the most 
rapid and comfortable route, and the tourist will 
ever be attracted by the magnificent scenery of 
the great plains and mountains, the beautiful 
lakes and grand rivers. It is to the lover of nat- 



ure, in every form, who with rifle, rod or camera 
would cultivate a closer acquaintance with the 
life of the wilderness that the new country made 
accessible by this road, offers a most inviting 
field for study and adventure. The most 
recently completed of our trans-continental 
railways, its line close to the Canadian bor- 
der, penetrates some of the best game 
country in the States. Within a compara- 
tively limited district, comprising two or 
three counties in Northwestern Montana 
and the adjoining Panhandle of Idaho, can 
be found a greater variety of big game than 
in any locality of similar size in the country. 
In fact, if you except the Columbia river 
black-tail deer, every member of the family 
is represented ; for here that rare visitor from the 
North, the woodland caribou, can be found. It 
may not be generally known that a herd of 
buffalo roams in the vicinity of Flathead Lake. 
To be sure a man by the name of Allard looks 
after them, with rather more care than the Great 
Father at Washington bestows upon his wards in 
the Yellowstone Park, and if you should shoot 
one of these bulls you would probably fare worse 
than did the poachers who have been systematic- 
ally slaughtering the Park buffalo for a number 
of winters past. 

Let us hope that the boundaries of our National 
Preserve will soon be enlarged so as to include 
the sources of the Yellowstone and Snake rivers, 
on the south, and the Absarokee mountains on 
the east, and that a sufficient force of troops and 
scouts may be stationed there to insure the com- 
plete protection of the wild creatures who have 
sought a refuge from the relentless pursuit of 
hide and horn hunters. Lack of time forced me 
to decline the invitation to spend a few days in 
the vicinity of Devil's Lake, famous for its 
fine duck and goose shooting, and. resisting the 
temptation to stop at Kalispell and take a pot 
shot at Allard's buffaloes, I arrived at Spokane 
and joined young Robert G — , who was return- 
ing to the Methow valley, so charmingly de- 
scribed by Mr. Waring in the May number of 
Recreation At Wanatchee the Great North- 
ern crosses the Columbia and here we left the 
railway boarding the steamer "City of Ellens- 
burgh," about to start on her regular trip up the 
river. The uniform courtesy of officers and 
crew gave promise of a pleasant trip which was 
more than fulfilled, and we landed at Virginia 
City with the good wishes of all hands for the 
success of our trip. A 40 mile tramp and ride 
over mountain and up the beautiful valley of the 
Methow, brought us to Robert's home, at the 
forks of the river, and we received a hearty wel- 
come from his brother and friends. After a 
council of war with our guide. Jack R — , we 
decided on a brief campaign in the mountains of 
the South Fork. This is the region that Owen 
Wister has described in his interesting sketch 
4 ' The White Goat and His Country," and that 
animal's claim to some part of it will undoubtedly 
always be respected. We passed one such spot 
on our way up the river. Jack suddenly halted 
and pointing across the valley, remarked : 
" There is the Goat Wall." The mountain rose 
to a considerable height almost perpendicularly ; 
only here and there on its surface was the bare 
face of rock dotted with little patches of green, 
where the scanty soil supported a few bushes and 



9° 



RECREA TION. 



scattering firs. " Look, near the top," said 
Jack, " there is a goat." 

"I see another," cried Robert, and soon we 
had counted seven. Experienced hunters will 
seldom disturb goats in such a place. 

" We'll find better hunting than that," con- 
tinued Jack, " and you shall kill your goat where 
he won't fall out of reach when you drop him." 
We carried out this program to the letter, a 
couple of days later; but, although the goat did 
not fall very far, he managed to strike in such a 
way as to break off both horns, illustrating the 
truth of Pat's remark that " 'Twas not the faliin' 
that hurt, but the landin'." 

Two men camping near us, hunted in another 
direction and killed on enormous old Billy, one 
of the largest I ever saw. 

On one mountain we found so many blue 
grouse that we gave up the attempt to hunt big 
game there. The continued noisy flight of these 
big birds must have notified the whole mountain 
side of our approach. 

Bad weather forced us to remain in camp a 
couple of days, but three deer hanging at the 
back of our cabin supplied the choicest cuts of 
venison, and the big open fire sent out warmth 
and cheer and afforded a base of operations for 
the exercise of Jack's skill in the art of camp 
cooking. I have hunted goats in other localities 
and their pursuit must always involve considera- 
ble mountain climbing; but the work on this trip 
was not beyond the capacity of the average ama- 
teur, and the game was in evidence every day, 
in force sufficient to lend additional interest and 
excitement to our efforts to approach within 
range. But our short hunt was over and all too 
soon we were compelled to break camp and bid 
good bye to our friends of the Methow, consol- 
ing ourselves with plans for a, longer stay next 
season. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



When I saw a notice of your magazine I ex- 
pected it would.be a clean, nice, readable pub- 
lication.- When I received a copy I was not 
disappointed ; so I talked a little with the boys, 
in your favor, and enclose herewith $5, for which 
please send Recreation to five of us. We are 
all boys that go shooting. I am 61 ; one of my 
shooting companions, A. J. Warner, is 71 ; but 
we are all boys in the field and expect to be as 
long as we can go out and get a few birds. 

Earl S, Ellithorpe, Prophetstown, 111. 



Dr. Bradford Allen, of Nashua, N. H., a 
member of the Nashua Club, of that city, while 
fishing at Holeb, Me., last June, caught 13 
trout whose total weight was 29 pounds. Holeb 
is a small station on the C. P. R., about 90 
miles east of Sherbrooke, P. Q. , the latter point 
being readily reached from any part of New 
England, via. B. & M. R. R., or from Montreal, 
via. C. P. or G. T. R. R. In the country 
around Holeb are the head waters of the Moose- 
head lake region. Trout are abundant and later, 
there is good deer, bear and other hunting. 
L. P. Kinne, Holeb, Me., has first class 
accommodations for sportsmen, and will take 
pleasure in answering all inquiries in regard to 
fish, game, etc. 



INDIANS IN JACKSONS HOLE. 

Marysvale, Wyom. 
Editor Recreation. 

Jacksons Hole lies just south of the Yellow- 
stone National Park, and, including the sur- 
rounding mountains, is about the same size as 
the Park. It no doubt contains more game 
than any other locality in the United States, 
outside the Park. The Shoshone Indian Reser- 
vation lies Southeast, and the Fort Hall Agency 
Southwest, in Idaho. These Indians of course 
know of the game here and it seems they come 
in here without let or hindrance, 

We have a good game law and we mean to 
enforce it if possible, but the Indians are coming 
pretty thick for us. Do not be surprised if you 
hear of trouble here soon. We can muster 
about 60 men and probably can get as many 
more from Green river. 

Not long since our constable, with two other 
men, started for Fall river, to look for game 
law violators. When near there they heard a 
great deal of shooting and going over to investi- 
gate saw an Indian skinning an elk. The 
Indian, on seeing them, mounted his horse and 
rode rapidly to the top of a hill, where he fired 
a shot. He was immediately joined by six 
other Indians. When our men rode up, the 
Indians covered them with their rifles and asked 
them what they wanted. The Constable read 
his warrant to them, but they refused to sur- 
render. 

These Indians had 7 elk hides on their saddle 
horses, and 3 pack horses loaded with hides, 
estimated at 20, for one day's hunt, and not a 
pound of meat had been saved, The men went 
to their camp and estimated the hides in sight at 
300 to 400. These Indians were mostly Ban- 
nocks. There were 17 lodges — about 35 bucks — 
hunting for hides. They surround a band of 
elk and annihilate them. 

A party was at once formed to take them. 
Our plan was to go up the Gros Ventre, to 
Green river, and come on them from the 
other way, but we struck a camp of Indians on 
Green river — of 8 bucks and their squaws, and 
74 horses — that were killing for hides. We 
arrested these bucks, brought them to the 
Hole, where they were tried. Six of them were 
fined $75 each and costs, amounting to $1,280 
in all, Five of them were from Fort Hall and 
had two passes, one — No. 599, was dated at 
Fort Hall agency, May 13th, 1895, issued for 
30 days and to report back to the agent at Fort 
Hall. It was signed by T. B. Teter. The 
other, No. 600, was dated at Fort Hall Agency, 
May 25th, 1895, issued for 30 days, to report to 
Shoshone Agency, Wyoming. This was signed 
by Thos. B. Teter. 

The arrests were made July 4th. These 
passes are now in possession of our Justice of 
the Peace. We have men out in different parts 
of the mountains, and our party is ready to start 
as soon as they return, if they find Indians or 
white men breaking the game laws. 

S. N. Leek. 



Subscribe for Recreation. 



Prospectors report deer and bear plentiful in 
vicinity of Robinsonville, Eastern Oregon. 



FROM THE FAR WEST 



9i 



FROM THE FAR WEST. 

At Pasco, while waiting for the train I saw 
two Siwash Indians bring in a sturgeon that 
measured nine feet from nose to tip of tail. 
They captured it with hook and line in the Co- 
lumbia river, a short distance from Pasco. 



Trout fishing in the Spokane river below the 
Falls is reported as being better this season than 
ever before. Spokane, with its many pleasant 
resorts and its cool climate, with excellent fishing 
and shooting within easy reach, is one of the most 
desirable resorts in the Northwest. 



Passengers on the N. P. Railway one day 
last week, as the train crossed Tompkins river, 
Mont., were treated to the rare sight of an ang- 
ler landing, from one cast, two Rainbow trout 
that would weigh three or four pounds each. The 
number of hats and handkerchiefs that were 
waved from the car windows indicated that the 
passengers appreciated good sport. 



Several gentlemen of Baker City, Ore., are 
agitating the formation of a new Gun Club, not 
being satisfied with the present organization 
whose members' chief ambition is reported to be 
to outrival each other in the killing of the larg- 
est bag of young ducks, yet unable to fly. Why 
this peculiar conduct on their part is unknown, 
as nearly all the members of the club have 
proved, at the trap, their ability to stop almost 
any kind of bird. 



At present trout fishing seems to be the lead- 
ing sport at Baker City. Fish are reported more 
numerous than usual this season. 



In proportion to population Baker City, Ore., 
has more bicycles than any other town in the 
Northwest, and a small miss with a red head leads 
the procession. She can set the pace for any 
of the men. The white horse isn't in it. 



The La Grande, Oregon, Gun Club, held a 
successful shooting tournament last week. 



Several parties at Baker City are organizing a 
hunting and fishing tour to the Malheur lake 
country, 150 miles southwest. Large and small 
game and fish are plentiful there. 



A gentleman from Astoria reports seeing a 
band of 21 elk in Clatsop county, south of Astoria, 
three weeks ago. 



Some of the army officers stationed at Fort 
Keough, Mont., say the magazine action of the 
new army rifle is faulty, and that it will never 
prove a practical arm in regular service. They 
praise the new 30-calibre cartridge highly, and 
say a gun built on the same plan as the regular 
Springfield rifle, to shoot the new smokeless 
cartridge, would be in every way a better and 
more serviceable arm. 



Mrs. Madge Olmstead, Miss Mabel Houston 
and Mr. Claud Houston, of Baker City, Ore., 
and Percy Olmstead, ensign U. S. N., are en- 
joying an outing in the canyon country of East- 
ern Oregon. They report trout and game 
abundant and their nomadic life delightful. 

W. A. Houston is spending the summer 
in the gold mines of the Salmon river country, 
Idaho, where he finds plenty of big game as well 
as nuggets. 



Carl Parker can justly claim the medal as the 
best rifle wing shot in Eastern Oregon. On 
July 4th he killed 44 sage hens, out of 50 shots, 
all on the wing, using 38-55 Winchester. 

Cinnamon and silver tip bears are reported 
numerous on the Little Missouri river, 30 miles 
South of the N. P. Railway. Cattle men on the 
round-up report seeing them every day. 

M. W. Miner. 



The new game law for New York provides an 
open season on deer from August 16th to Octo- 
ber 31st, except in the counties of Greene, Ulster 
and Sullivan, where deer are protected until 
1900. Hounding is permitted between Septem- 
ber 10th and October 10th, except in the coun- 
ties of Delaware, Greene, Ulster and Sullivan. 
Only one carcass may be taken from the county 
where killed and that only when accompankd 
by the owner. On black and grey squirrels, 
hares and rabbits the open season is September 
[St to November 30th, except in the counties of 
St. Lawrence, Franklin, Essex, Clinton, Lewis, 
Warren, Hamilton, Herkimer, Saratoga, Wash- 
ington, Onondaga, Oswego, Duchess. Steuben, 
Orange, Richmond and Delaware, where the open 
season is from October 1st to April 30th. 

On wild ducks the open season is September 1st 
to March 31. Night shooting and the use of 
swivel or punt guns prohibited at all times. 

The open season for quails is November and 
December, except in the counties of Monroe, 
Livingston, Orleans, Wyoming, Genesee, Seneca, 
Cayuga, Onondaga, Tioga, Tompkins, Wayne, 
Ontario, Steuben, Courtland and Otsego, where 
they shall not be killed until November 1898. 

Woodcock and grouse may be killed between 
August 1 6th and December 31st. 

On Wilson's or English snipe, plover, tail, 
mud-hen, gallinule, grebe, bittern, surf-bird, 
curlew, water chicken, bay snipe or shore bird, 
the season is from September 1st to April 30th. 

Mongolian or ring-necked pheasants are pro- 
tected until 1897. 

The open season for trout is April 1 6th to 
August 31st. The taking of trout, salmon trout 
or land-locked salmon less than six inches long 
is forbidden at all times. Salmon trout, lake 
trout and land-locked salmon may be taken from 
May 1st to September 30th. 

Black bass may be taken during June, July. 
August, September, October. November and 
December, except in Lake George, where the 
open season is August, September, October, 
November and December. Pickerel, pike or 
wall-eyed pike, may be caught June 1st to Febru- 
ary 28. Salmon August 15th to February 28th. 
None less than 18 inches long to be taken, 



9 2 



RECREA TION. 



POINTERS FOR HOME SEEKERS. 

I am still having many inquiries from people 
who are seeking homes in the west, as to the 
conditions existing in the Pecos valley. For the 
information of all such the following letter is 
printed. It is from a man who lived there sev- 
eral years. 

'■ Dear Sir. — Replying to your favor of 8th, 
the Pecos valley has proved a failure, in the ex- 
periences of a great many people, as a fruit 
country, and even a,s a general farming country. 
I left there a year ago, and can no longer recom- 
mend it to anyone as a place to live, or to invest 
money. My experiences there have been as dis- 
astrous as those of many other people. My losses 
in real estate investments foot up about $4,500. 
I sold a section of as good land as there is in the 
valley for $1,000. It cost me about $2,500. A 
great many of the farmers who are there are offer- 
ing to sell their land at what it cost, and some of 
them for much less, in order to get away ; but 
they find it difficult to sell at any price. 

" An Italian colony of 30 families abandoned 
their land, forfeiting all they had paid on it, and 
left the country, after trying to raise crops two 
years. 

" A Swiss colony, of about 40 families, found 
their attempt equally disastrous. All are gone 
but four or five families, and these are trying to 
sell their lands, so as to recoup a part of their 
losses. Hundreds of Americans have left the 
valley after living there one to three years, many 
of them having lost all the money they invested. 

" Don't ever allow yourself to be duped into 
settling in that graveyard of blasted hopes and 
wasted fortunes. Yours truly, 

" A. G. Ingram." 



Meeker, Colo. 
Editor Recreation. 

Marvine Lodge, the Club House of the 
Marvine Rod and Gun Club, is now open, under 
the management of Wells and Patterson, whose 
address is Meeker, Colo. 

The lodge is located on Marvine creek, in 
northwestern Colorado ; is in the heart of the 
great White river timber- reserve, and is 
within easy reach of the famous hunting and 
fishing grounds of that part of the State. Deer 
are plentiful close to the lodge, and hundreds of 
elk range within 20 miles. Forty miles to the 
north there is said to be the largest herd of 
antelope left in the United States, numbering 
5,000 or more, while the trout fishing is equal 
to any in the west. A fish a minute with a single 
fly is the average catch at the Marvine lakes, only 
seven miles away, while from 20 to 40 pounds is 
the day's catch for an angler in Marvine creek, 
or the North Fork of White river, within six 
miles of the lodge. 

The lodge is 80 miles from Rifle, Colo., 
on the D. & R. G. Ry., and is reached via 
Meeker, by the stages of the Colorado Stage 
and Transportation Company. 

Wells and Patterson are prepared to take hunt- 
ing parties to the Elkhead mountains, California 
park, the head waters of the Little Snake, Lost 
lake, Lost park, the Pagoda peak country and 
Williams Fork of the Bear. Marvine Lodge is 
a delightful place at which to make headquarters 
for hunting or fishing, or both. W. W. H. 



Editor Recreation. Marysvale, Wyo. 

I see in your magazine several items from this 
part of the country, and wish to impress on the 
minds of eastern sportsmen, who wish to visit 
this region for sport, that it would be wise for 
them to engage their guides in Wyoming. The 
guides from Montana and Idaho have been com- 
ing in here, and have allowed their parties to 
slaughter game by wholesale, females and young, 
as well as males. The law will be enforced 
in this state during the coming season, and some 
of these butchers will be made to pay dearly for 
their lawlessness. One German outfit killed, 
last fall, on Buffalo Fork, 30 head of elk, and 
left their carcasses to rot ; and furthermore, got 
a permit to carry their plunder through the Yel- 
lowstone National park. If this sort of butchery 
is not stopped, our elk, deer, mountain sheep and 
antelope will soon be extinct. 

There is plenty of game here for the true 
sportsman, but if this waste is permitted a few 
more years, as in the last four or five years, your 
lifles will rust on the wall, for there will be no 
further use for them. Any information in regard 
to this country, and to guides, can be had by 
addressing Frank Petersen. 



Editor Recreation. Peekskill, N. Y. 

Recreation is a great and good magazine. It 
fills a niche in sportsmen's literature almost to 
perfection. The illustrations are elegant, and 
the letter press fine. Now, after all this, you 
might think you have a perfect magazine ; but it is 
not so. There are thousands of men in this coun- 
try, and the number is growingdaily, whose only 
recreation is a couple of hours, once a week, at 
trap shooting. This class of men are drawn 
from every trade and profession. Doctors who, 
in their boyhood days, tramped many a day, with 
dog and gun, and who now have no time or 
place to do so, gladly break away for a few hours, 
and relax at the traps. Lawyers and merchants 
are equally interested, and the large number of 
strictly amateurs is constantly increasing. The 
growth of trap shooting clubs, all over the coun- 
try, is evidence enough of the popularity of the 
sport. Modern powder and modern guns, new 
traps and good inanimate targets, together with 
an increased willingness on the part of gentle- 
men to give up a little time occasionally from 
business, is responsible for the increased interest 
in this branch of recreation. 

It strikes me that a little space in your 
esteemed journal, devoted to things most inter- 
esting to amateur trap shooters, i. e. : results of 
best and latest experiments with nitro powders ; 
most approved methods of loading different 
shells ; various wadding ; digest of tournaments; 
results for the month, and many other things en- 
tertaining and instructive, would fit nicely in your 
pages. Then, as a matter of record, your maga- 
zine is one that many would like to keep and 
refer to occasionally, while the weekly sporting 
papers are glanced over and lain aside. 

Possibly all this might excite some correspond- 
ence that would prove beneficial to all. 

P. H. Mason, M. D. 

[I should be delighted to print just such mat- 
ter as Dr. Mason outlines, in every issue of 
Recreation, if he or other trap shooters will 
kindly furnish it. — Ed.] 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



93 



Editor Recreation. New York, N. Y. 

Coming down from a fishing trip to lake St. 
John, a few days ago, via the Boston and Maine 
R. R., I had a pleasant chat with Mr. G. B. 
French, of Nashua, N. H., a disciple of both 
Walton and Blackstone (you perceive that I 
place Walton's name first). Mr. French was 
returning from a successful fishing trip at the 
Nashua Club's preserves, at Holeb, Me., and 
gave me the following memoranda of that 
neighborhood, which may be of interest to your 
readers, "June 25, counted 31 deer, nearly all 
bucks, along the shore of Turner Pond — mostly 
within 20 rods of the shore. Counted 25 deer on 
another day within a shore space of 200 feet. 
This pond is about one-half mile in diameter 
and is full of trout from \ to \\ pounds in 
weight. The deer, in the hot days of June. 
July and August, will remain on the shore with 
. canoes in plain sight. 

"June 26. Between nine and ten in the 
evening, while out in a canoe, with a lantern or 
" open jack," as it is called, we ran the canoe's 
bow within two feet of a doe, on the shore, and 
she never looked up till we stopped. Then she 
turned around, faced the lantern and jumped 
away with never a whistle. A little further on, 
another doe, licking a log on the shore, paid no 
attention to us till we ran the bow against her 
flank, when she leaped into the woods, making 
such a whistling that she frightened nearly all 
of the other deer out of the pond. We were out 
sight-seeing only — no firearms of course — for 
the deer are protected by law, and nowhere else 
in Maine have we heard of so many being seen at 
a time. Moose have been seen about the pond 
this month, but they move off to the deeper 
woods in the fall. 

" The custom of those fishing in the ponds 
about Holeb, under lease to Mr. L. P. Kinne, 
who has comfortable camps there, is to discourage 
the killing of trout to carry away and to take 
only such as can be eaten. This has kept these 
ponds well-stocked so far. Trout in Moose 
river are caught up to <\\ pounds in weight, but 
that size is exceptional. These ponds arc a part 
of the headwaters flowing to the Moosehead 
lake region." F. G. Nelson. 



Sheridan is about 125 miles southwest of 
Billings, Mont. The Big Horn mountains are 
18 miles from here, Big Horn basin about 60 
miles. A new road has been built from Sheridan , 
over the mountains, to Yellowstone Park, for 
hunting and fishing parties. In fact, we are in 
the heart of the big game country. We are on the 
Burlington & Missouri Railway. I can furnish 
single horse and wagon at $1.50 a day, team 
$3.00. Guides can be furnished by the day, 
week or month. Fine deer, elk, bear and ante- 
lope hunting can be had by one day's drive. 
The Big and Little Goose creeks rise high in the 
mountains and teem with mountain and brook 
trout. By going six to ten miles one can 
get the finest kind of trout fishing. We have a 
new and delightful summer resort at Dome 
lake. Mark R. Perkins, Sheridan, Wyo. 



and keeping a pack of hounds for hunting deer, 
foxes or hares. The land is high, very rich, and 
capable of producing all the fruits, vegetables, 
butter, milk, eggs, etc., that a hotel needs. 
Plenty of fish can be caught within fifty feet of 
the house. 

" I have a beautiful bathing beach along the 
front of the grove, and i64 feet of water outside 
that, in the main channel. I have a charming 
salt water lake near the middle of the grove, a 
salt water estuary washing its front, and the 
Gulf of Mexico is abouta quarter of a mile away. 
The place is very healthy, from 30 to 200 feet 
above the sea, as fertile as land can well be. It 
slopes to and from the river, so that a hotel in 
the terraced Italian style could be erected on a 
high ridge 40 feet from the water, Do you 
know of any one who would like to take an in- 
terest in such an enterprise ?" 



The antlers of the caribou are said to grow 
much larger in Newfoundland than elsewhere. 
The season opens there October 1st and the best 
hunting grounds are on the barrens 20 to 30 
miles inland — near Grand Pond. This point is 
reached via the Bay of Islands and the I lumber 
river, on the west coast. There are four Indians 
and two Frenchmen at Hall's Bay, who are re- 
puted to be good guides — Andrew Joe, Levi Joe, 
Peter Joe, John Paul, Richard LeBuff and 
Joseph Bushie. They charge $2.00 a day. 
♦Non-residents are charged a license of $100 for 
hunting on the island, and no one man is allowed 
to kill mote than five caribou in a single season. 
The Red Cross line of passenger steamers run 
from New York to Newfoundland, via Halifax. 
Bowring & Archibald, 18 Broadway, are the 
agents. 

I have noted, with much pleasure, the inter- 
est taken in the Mongolian pheasant question 
through the pages of Recreation. The 
Tacoma Gun Club put out 15 Mongolian cocks 
and 15 hens last March, on several of the 
ranches in this county. The birds were turned 
loose, to shift for themselves, and as soon as 
liberated took to the woods. Accounts of them 
are now coming in. Two or three of the old 
birds have been seen, accompanied by large 
broods of youngsters, which are now able t 
I think the secret of raising these birds i> to 
turn them out to take care of themselves. 

John Lkasuri . 

Tacoinu, Wash. 



Have just returned from Ganoga Lake. It is 
in the North mountain, on the line of the 1 - 
high Valley Railway, at an elevation of 2 
feet. It is a fine place for camping. A few- 
black bear are to be found and the fishing is 
good, pickerel and bass being abundant. About 
five miles from there, at a place called Thorn- 
dale, there is good trout fishing. The entire lo- 
cality is wild, with considerable underbrush. 

Herbert D. Williams, So. Bethlehem, I 



Mr. J. Mortimer Murphy writes from Sponge 
Harbor, Hillsboro Co., Fla.: 

" I am thinking of forming a stock company 
to put up a sportman's hotel on my place here, 



We have little game here except a few rabbits 
and quail. I have only lived here about two 
years, but am told that the game birds are de- 
creasing. Good sport can yet be had, however. 



94 



R EC RE A TION. 



There are wild fowl on the eastern coast and 
some deer in the almost inaccessible and " un- 
traversible" swamps. A party from here who 
went deer hunting in these swamps in the latter 
part of November, told me the people there did 
not know an election had taken place. 

Elliott Warren, 

Winston, N. C. 



Would be pleasea to join some one going East 
for bay birds and .striped bass, in September, or 
to the St. Lawrence for black bass, or to Can- 
ada. Would also be obliged for a line from any 
of the brethren who have shot bay birds in vicin- 
ity of Virginia Beach. 

E. A. J., 
P. O. Box 1798, New York. 



An 'immense flock of wild geese, two tiers 
deep, passed down Eagle Pass a few weeks ago. 
An enthusiastic member of a group, who watched 
this phenomenal flock for several minutes, de- 
clared that from the tip of the most easterly to 
the tip of the most westerly fowl it was a mile 
broad. 

If this thing is to continue it will be proper to 
change the name of that town to Goose Pass. 



The Great Northern Railway issues a poster 
giving synopsis of the game and fish laws of 
Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South* 
Dakota, Montana, Idaho and Washington. Copies 
are sent to all agents of the company, with instruc- 
tions to hang them in the passenger rooms and 
other conspicuous places. Copies will also be 
furnished to sportsmen's clubs and to individuals 
on application. 



A St. Louis man has invented and put on 
the market a shot cartridge which he claims will 
kill ducks, regularly, at 150 yards, men at 200 
yards (using buckshot), and which he says makes 
a $25 gun shoot just as well, and kill just as 
much game as a $300 gun. Natural laws cut 
but a small figure in the -calculations of some 
" inventors/' 



Dr. Barrett and party will leave Brooklyn 
about Sept. 1st for Red Lodge, Mont , via the 
Northern Pacific R. R., for a seven weeks' cruise 
through the Yellowstone Park, Jacksons Hole, 
and the lower Snake river country. They have 
contracted for three guides and complete saddle 
and packhorse outfit. 



York, Neb. 

On account of the dry weather here this spring, 
the hatch of young prairie chickens is reported 
very large. Farmers report seeing numerous 
coveys of young birds just hatched. 

M. W. M. 



Wise P. O., Wyoming. 
I shall be obliged if any of your readers can 
give me information of the best places for ducks 
and geese, in Montana, or North-west Territories, 
accessible by wagon from the Northern Pacific 
Railroad. R. Ashworth. 



Mr. S. T. Fullerton is therjest Game Warden 
we have ever had. You ought to see the pile of 
nets he has captured this season. I hope they 
will make it so hot for some of those robbers 
that they will be glad to leave good enough 
alone. E, J. Pauli, 

St. Paul, Minn. 



Last evening two deer came to the river, by 
our house, surveyed us all and trotted off. 
Within an hour three mountain sheep were on 
the hill, back of the house, and we all turned 
out to look at them. James Fullerton, 

Ten Sleep, Wyo. 



The National Racing Board of the L. of A. 
W. has accepted the following records made by 
Class A and Class B riders. 

Unpaced flying start, Class A records, made by 
William DeCardy at Louisville, Ky: — 

One-third of a mile, time 38 3-5 seconds. 

Half-mile, im. 2-5S. 

One mile, time 2m. 12 4-5S. 

The following is a list of Class B competitive 
records allowed by the Board: — 

Three miles, time 7m. 1 2-5S., F. G. Lacy 
Lcs Angeles, Cal. 

Four miles, time 9m. 26%s., F. G. Lacy, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Five miles, time urn., 45 ]/ z %., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Six miles, time 14m. 18 3-5S., F. G. Lacy, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Seven miles, time 16m. 49-is., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Eight miles, time 19m. 2i%s., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Nine miles, time 21m. 56^s. , F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Eleven miles, time 26m. 55£s., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Twelve miles, time 29m. 32^s., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Thirteen miles, time 32m. i3X s -> F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Fourteen miles, time 34m. 49^s., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Sixteen miles, time 39m. 53/^ s -> F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Seventeen miles, time 42m. 27s., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Eighteen miles, time 45m. 1-5S., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Nineteen miles, time 47m. 32s., F. G. Lacy, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

Twenty-one miles, time 52m. 43%., F. G. 
Lacy, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Twenty-two miles, time 55m. ig^s., F. G. 
Lacy, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Twenty-three miles, time 57m. 56fs. , F. G. 
Lacy, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Twenty-four miles, time ih. 37m. , F. G. 
Lacy, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Twenty-five miles, time ih. 3m. 7fs. 



The shotgun and book which you sent me for 
a club of subscribers have been received and 
I am delighted with both. Would not take $15 
for them. Willie Hamm, Calais, Me. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



95 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 

Some things show which way the wind blows. 
For instance : Parker Bros, placed an advertise- 
ment in Recreation, in October last, for three 
months on trial. They are still in it, and have 
lately signed a contract for a year. The same is 
true of the Horton Manufacturing Company, the 
Davenport Fire Arms Company, and Henry 
Milward & Sons. Spratts tried it one insertion, 
and are now in for a year. Marlin Fire Arms 
Company, ditto. They all say the returns are 
entirely satisfactory. 

The Remington Arms Company, having sold 
out all its bicycles, ordered its advertisement 
discontinued. Mr. Cannon, the advertising man- 
ager of the gun department, heard of this, and 
promptly requested that the space formerly 
occupied by the bicycle advertisement be re- 
served for him. He was not willing that the 
house should lose so valuable a position. The 
Remington gun advertisement is in for the re- 
mainder of the year. 

The Monarch Cycle Company took a half page 
for four months. At the expiration of that con-, 
tract, it renewed for three months — increasing 
the space to a page. 1 his second order expired 
with the June number, and, although the Com- 
pany's entire product is sold ahead, the manager 
ordered the advertisement carried in the July 
number. 

H. Boker & Co. made a three months' con- 
tract, and, at the expiration of that time, re- 
newed it for six months. The American Tobacco 
Company started in for three months, and have 
now ordered their announcement of Yale Mixt- 
ure, to run four months more. 

The Ideal Manufacturing Company made a 
trial order of one insertion, October, 1894, re- 
luctantly. They have been in ever since, and 
say they will probably stay in as long as they 
stay anywhere. 

Write any or all these people, and ask them 
about it. 

If you have anything to sell, advertise it in 
Recreation. 



Recreation now has a bona fide paid circula- 
tion of over 10,000. This is growing at the 
rate of 1,000 to 1,500 a month. If you doubt 
it, write or call on P. F. McBreen. 216 William 
street, New York, who prints the magazine. 
Write or call on The Gardiner Binding and Mail- 
ing company, same address, who bind and mail 
it each month. They are authorized to tell the 
truth, and to show you their books, or the 
magazine in process. 

The American News company is now buying 
more than 5,000 copies a month. Write or call 
on the manager. He is authorized to tell you 
the truth, and to show you his books. I have 
more than 5,000 bona fide paid subscribers. 
Will gladly show you my books if you care to 
see them. 

Recreation has 26 pages of paid advertis- 
ing, for which signed contracts will be shown, at 
any time. This is a larger circulation and a better 
advertising patronage than any other magazine 
ever had at three years of age. Recreation is only 
10 months old. It was started in the midst of the 
panic, and in five months was paying expenses. 



How do I account for this success ? I print 
good literature and handsome pictures; I sell 
the magazine at $1 a year — 10 cents a copy. I 
give the people what they want, and at their 
price. 

I hustle. 

That tells the whole story. 

If you have anything to sell, advertise it in 
Recreation. 



Recreation is glad of the young Indian war 
now on in Jacksons Hole, Wyoming. The 
Indian agents have, all along, insisted that their 
pets were not allowed to hunt off their reserva- 
tions. Recreation has proved this claim to be 
false. For six months past it has been agitating 
this question. It has urged the settlers, both in 
print and by personal letters, to stand up for 
their rights ; to enforce the law ; to protect the 
game ; to keep the Indians out of the game 
country, at any cost. 

A climax has at last been reached. Agent 
Teter has been compelled to admit that some of 
his wards were off their reservation and were 
killing game contrary to law ; he has had to go 
after a band of them and take them home, be- 
fore he did this, however, the settlers rounded 
up a few of these same Bannock Indians and 
killed them. At this writing both Indians and 
settlers are congregating in belligerent mood ; 
United States troops are en route to the scene cf 
the trouble ; state militia is under arms and it 
seems likely that more of the Indians will be made 
good. I hope the Indian Bureau will learn, from 
all this, that its agents in Wyoming and Idaho 
have been lax in their regard for game laws and 
they that may be replaced by men who will keep 
their chickens at home. 

Governor Richards and the people of Wyom- 
ing have reached a point in this controversy 
where patience is no longer in evidence, and if 
the United States troops don't take caie of the 
Indians the Governor will turn his cowboys and 
hunters loose. Then there will be music in the 
air. The Governor telegraphed me, on July 26th. 
" I am determined that all Indians shall obey 
the game laws." 



Every reader of Recreation, will recall with 
pleasure the delightful story, printed in 
the January number, of "A Woman's First 
Mallard." The author of that story, Mis. 
Katherine M. Baxter, has written another, 
equally charming, entitled ' Billy Boy and 
Belle," which will be published in the September 
number. It describes, in spirited terms. .1 horse- 
back ride across country, and some novel epis 
thereof. It will be handsomely illustrated by 
H. S. Watson. 

Other attractive features of the September 
issue will be " Lost in the Cheat Mountains," 
a story of a hunting adventure, by W, I . 
Washington; " A Bald-faced Grizzly in Camp." 
a thrilling recountal of a most novel and daring 
interview with Old Ephraim, by M. W. Miner; 
"Where Leaps the Ouananiche," a charming 
poem, by Dr. E. L. Tiffany; "A Half Hour 
with the Quail," by Dr. E. P. Kremer ; " A 
Close Call for General Sherman," by Lieut. J. 1 1 



9 6 



RECREA TION. 



Sands, and an interesting and instructive paper 
on "Fishing with the Fly," by Dr. M. G. 
Ellzey. 

With this issue Major Schieffelin's story 
"Crossing the Rockies in '61," is concluded. 
Dr. E. J. Tucker's story carries the reader 
toward the land of the Aztecs, and there will be 
a great fund of good reading in the various 
departments. 



The Scheutzenfest at Glendale Park, Long 
Island, which closed July ioth, was in every way 
successful. It was more a festival — a merry- 
making — than an effort at careful, scientific rifle 
shooting, yet some good scores were made. F. 
C. Ross made the best record and was crowned 
King of the Sharpshooters. About 500 prizes 
were distributed, partly in cash, but including 
many valuable articles of jewelry, plate, firearms, 
etc. There was one prize of $500 in gold ; one 
of $300 ; one a silver dinner set worth $1,200 ; 
a silver tankard valued at $500, etc. 



Rev. E. L. Tiffany, Guilford Centre, N. Y., 
is certainly an all round practical, sensible, 
brainy man. He has lately been assigned to the 
pastorate of the Fitst Congregational church, of 
that place, and as a part of the good work which 
he found it necessary to do, has organized a 
gun club. He is a physician as well and knows 
the value of outdoor sports to those who would 
be good Christians Dr. Tiffany has contributed 
several delightful poems to Recreation, one of 
which will be published in the September number. 



Send Recreation a brief, terse, boiled-down 
account of your hunting, fishing, cycling, yacht- 
ing or canoeing trip. If you carried a camera 
send in photographs for illustrating your sketch. 
If you have not time or inclination to write the 
story in 'full, rend at least some notes of the 
prominent features or incidents of it. 



The Columbia College crew won an easy 
victory in the boat race against those of Cornell 
and the University of Pennsylvania, at Pough- 
keepsie, June 24th, making the course in 21 
minutes, 46 2-5 seconds. Cornell was second, 
but lost by six lengths. Pennsylvania's shell 
swamped at the two mile post. 



Mr. V. B. Buck and family are spending their 
fifth season at their beautiful summer home on 
Spectacle Island, in the Georgian Bay, Ontario. 
Mr. Buck is a prominent sportsman of Kansas 
City, Mo., and a most generous friend to Rec- 
reation. 



If you have received a sample copy of Recre- 
ation that you have not ordered, look it over 
carefully. It is sent by request of some friend of 
yours who likes it, and who wants you to know 
of its good qualities. Why not show your ap- 
preciation of his courtesy by subscribing for the 
magazine. 



POSSIBLE SMILES. 

Maud (to her brother's chum, at the boat 
race.) — I know you college boys are awfuily 
wild, and we were almost afraid to have brother 
Charlie come here ; but there's one thing that 
comforts us, and that is, he never goes into a 
saloon. 

Fred — No, Charlie don't go in; he stays out- 
side and we go in and throw him out a hose. 



Had a fortune 

From his dad; 
Craze for writin', 

Had it bad. 
Thought he wuz a 

Genius sure; 
Fooled too much 'ith 

Literatoor. 
Published poems, 

Costly group; 
Now he's poor an' 

In th' soup. 

— Boston Courier. 



A curious thing I've observed — 

Our language was made to perplex — 

A man of letters ofttimes 
Has neither a V nor an X. 

— Washington Post. 



Query. — Was a woman ever known to object 
to the breeches buoy as a means of escape from 
a shipwreck? 



A man may guy, 

And a man may lie, 

And a man may bluff and blow 

But he can't get rich 

Sitting in the shade 

Waiting for business to grow. 



Digby — I hear that George Gould thinks his 
recently married sister, Anna, spends her money 
too freely. 

Gagley — That's all right as long as she keeps a 
count. 



Rameses — I'm all broken out with hives. 
Cyclops — So, my lord ? What kind ? 
Rameses — I was stung by a lot of bees to-day 
and I do suspect they're bee hives. 



Watts — 1 see Spacer's story has caught on in 
great shape. 

Rotts — Yes, its a prehensile tale — so to speak. 



Angler — What's the best way to kill a gar, 
when you get one on your hook ? 

Spangler — Well, I should say the quickest 
way would be to give him a garlic. 



A Wyoming kid said: 

" If I had Laramie sights on my Mallard rifle 
I'd go down to the river and kill some of them 
Ballard ducks for breakfast." 



BICYCLING. 



The annual meet of the League of American 
Wheelmen, which was held at Asbury Park dur- 
ing the past week, has opened up an era of possi- 
bilities never before dreamed of by even the most 
ultra cyclists. During the three days' racing the 
crowds averaged iooo a day, and fully 10,000 
wheelmen attended the meet. 

Those who saw the extraordinary interest dis- 
played in the races were tempted to ask if cycling 
races would not eventually rival baseball in the 
hearts of the people. This is not impossible. 
When baseball was first played it was by ama- 
teurs. This continued for years until profes- 
sionalism became a necessity. 

Just so with cycling to day. It is now passing 
out of the ameteur alphabetical class so far as 
racing is concerned. The action of the Racing 
Board in their recent meeting exemplified this 
when they gave their official recognition to pro- 
fessionals. 

This action will create a revolution in the 
ranks of racing wheelmen. Every man in Class 
B with any kind of a record will now jump out 
as a professional and race for revenue only. If 
the L. A. W. can keep the sport clean and free 
from all suspicion of trickery they need not fear 
for patronage. It is the opinion of many wheel- 
men that it will not be a great while before a 
regular bicycle circuit is formed. — New York 
Herald. 



Editor Recreation. 



Albany, N. Y 



My experience in bicycle sailing has not been 
very satisfactory. Unless the wind is abaft it is 
difficult to obtain favorable results I used a pole 
of bamboo for a mast and lashed it to the wheel 
just back of handle bars, to be out of the way 
in steering. I then fastened the tip of sail to hub 
of back wheel, with a wire and small pulley. 
This gave me control of the sail and enabled me 
to get it low, so it would not over-balance easily. 
My boom was only half as long as my sail. This 
let me handle quickly for a semi-tack, but it is 
impossible to grab on to the ground tightly 
enough to tack against wind. With wind abaft, 
one can fairly fly and trust to — luck to stop. 

R. F. W. 



The Rev. Mr. Dennett, of New York, said in 
his pulpit a few days ago : "What was once 
thought to be impossible has been accomplished. 
We have even outdone Peter, who failed to walk 
on the water. We are riding on the wind. Take 
this beautiful wheel, this rubber bauble, with its 
steel wings, this scientific angel, which seems to 
bear you on its unwearied pinions, and tell me 
is my text out of place when I say that what Job 
did in his figurative escape from trouble, riding 
on the air, the wearied and confined toiler at the 
desk and counter performs when he shuts the 
door behind him, comes forth into God's pure 
air, and mounts his scientific angel for a buoyant 
ride of miles and miles without a thought of 
care ?" 



p. m. June 27th, with a message to Colonel 
Kline, at Madison Barracks, reached Sackett's 
Harbor at 3:40 p. M. of June 30th. Starting on 
June 9, Lieutenant Wise and Private Weed 
made the trip from Madison Barracks to Gov- 
ernor's Island in 88 hours. The return trip was 
made by Weed alone in 96 hours and 40 minutes. 
Weed rode a 21-pound wheel, and carried the 
regulation soldier's equipment, which weighs 
about 35 pounds. 



The management of the Rhode Island State Fair 
is planning the building of what it is proposed 
shall be the finest bicycle track in the country. 
It is to be three laps to the mile, and no expense 
or skill is to be spared to make it a record 
breaker. The Rhode Island Fair proposes to 
hold a bicycle tournament during Exposition 
week, which opens September 16. 



Perley Burritt arrived in Chicago, recently com- 
pleting a ride on an 1 8 pound bicycle from J ^ckson- 
vi!le,Fla., to Chicago The total distance covered 
was 1,385 miles. Burritt started on his ride June 
13- 



The young ladies in York, Neb., are too nice 
to wear bloomer bicycle costumes. Only one 
has dared to appear in them, and the evil prophe- 
cies in regard to her future, for appearing in such 
attire, would hoodoo old Trinity. 

" Mike " Dernberger, of Syracuse, rode two 
miles in 3m. 51 4-5S., at Louisville. May 30th, 
cutting almost three seconds from the record, 
which previously stood at 3m. 54fs. 



Arthur Zimmerman made a new world's record 
at Pittsburg, June 22d, by covering a mile in 
two minutes on a quarter mile track. 



At Philadelphia, June 22, John S. Johnson 
established a half mile unpaced professional 
record, doing it in 59m. 2-5S. 



Charles Murphy, of New York, broke the 
world's mile record in competition at Waltham, 
May 30th. The new record is 2m. 1 4-5S. 



Chairman Gideon, of the L. A. W. National 
Racing Board, announces that he will not 
sanction any record trials until after October 1 . 



Private Arthur E. Weed, of Company F, Ninth 
Infantry, who left New York on a bicycle at 3 



Elgin, 111. 

Herewith please find draft, $13, for 13 new 
subscribers to Reckf.ation. I am so delighted 
with its bright, newsy stories, that it affords me 
pleasure to be the means of increasing its circu- 
lation. Four of these gentlemen are taking a 
magazine at $2 a year, but say yours is much 
better, at half the price. Sportsmen owe you a 
debt of gratitude for giving them a first-class 
publication at so low a price. 

Fred. M. Adams. 



97 



FISH AND FISHING. 



WHERE LEAPS THE OUANANICHE. 

Following is a list of anglers who have recently 
visited the Island House, Lake St, John, 
Canada, and of their catches of Ouananiche : 



No. of Fish 
caught. 



G. F. Gregory, Syracuse, N. Y., 
E. G. Seymour, 
Arthur Beebe, »" 

Dr. W. H. Brown, " 
Mrs. W. H. Brown, " 

D. C. Olin, Kalamazoo, Mich., 
W. W. Olin, 

J. Nelson Parker, Boston, 
G. H. Thomson, Quebec, 
Nelson G. Palmer, 
H. W. Hawley. Chicago, 
A. G. Hegeman, New York, 
Dr. R. T. Morris, 

lulian Mitchell, Jr., Charleston, S. C 
"Dr. R. R. Trotter, Yonkers, N. Y., 

E. M. Coats, Springfield, Mass, 

E. H. Sterns, " 22 
H. A. Sherwin, Cleveland, O., 28 
J. H. Walsh, 96 Spring St., New York, 16 
A. W. Hooper. New Haven, Conn 
L. C. Flynt, Monson, Mass., 
A. D. Norcross, Monson, Mass., 

F. G. Nelson, New York, 
E. B. Mayo, Boston, 
TVI. D. Tyson, Baltimore, 
E. C Quiggle, Hartford, Conn., 
J. E. Nichols, New York, 
Wm. B. Neal, Newark, O., 
Wm. Sargent, " " 
Geo. Cottrell, New York, 
M. H. Hulbert, " 
J. G. Hecksher, " 
Jos. Gamble, Plattsburgh, N. Y., 
J. S. Codman, Boston, 
Wm J. Schieffelin, New York, 
R. Bacon, Jr., Cleveland, O., 
J. T. 'Carpenter, New York, 
J.M.Pangmanand( Montreal 
J. A. Hamilton, ) ' 



13 

2 5 
2 5 

7 
1 5 

6 

173 

6 

10 

!Q3 



79 

152 

80 

54 
56 

36 



129 

62 

10 

29 

97 
14 

13 



Largest. 
S&lbs 

sH 

5 
4 
4 
3 3 A 

4 

3 
3 
3 l A 

2 l / 2 

5 

hi 

4 , 

4V2 

3 

4 

■fii 

3 1 /* 

3 3 A 

1% 

3V2 

2 

2^ > 

u 

4 

4 

k 

3 



State Fish Commissioner Kirsch, of Indiana, 
has recently investigated the fishes of the Mau- 
mee river and published the results in the 
Bulletin of the U. S. Fish Commission. He 
finds the Maumee basin surprisingly rich in 
number of species, the total number now known 
from that river basin being no fewer than 87, in- 
cluding 1 sturgeon, 2 gas-pikes, 8 catfish, c, 
suckers, 25 minnows, 2 whitefish, 9 sunfishes, 
and basses, and 13 darters. The number of 
species of valuable food and game fishes is large, 
among them being both the large and small- 
mouthed black bass, the pike (Lucius lucius), 
the muskallonge, the wall-eyed pike, the Sanger 
and the rock bass 



The Nashua Club, of Nashua, N. H., con- 
trols some excellent fishing and shooting privir 
leges at Holeb, Me., on the Canadian Pacific 
R. R. The following is a list of the members, 
all of whom are residents of Nashua : 

Dr. Bradford Allen, George E. Anderson, 
George F. Andrews, Frank Ayers, Mr. Dennison, 
E. F. Emerson, G. B. French, C. F. Hamblett, 
Dr. E. F. McQuesten, John F. Stark. 

The club preserves are located about half-way 
between the Megantic Club region and Moose- 
head lake. 



There, has been some fishing this spring up 
the Potomac, but no very large catches. The 
perch fishing, for the last two months, has been 
grand. It is almost at our door. I took a walk 
with a friend, not long ago. Saw parties fishing 
with three snoods on their lines and raking white 
perch, three at a time. Our bass fishing is not 
good until fall. One or two frosts make it more 
agreeable for the anglers, and the fish are 
better. Our party generally gets off about 
October 1st. Chas. Sully Wheeler. 

Washington, D. C. 



Walter M. Hazeltine, who contributes such 
delightful poems to Recreation, writes from 
East Bethel, Vt. : 

" Am once more among the green hills, where 
I shall probably spend the summer, seeking 
diligently ' for renewed strength and vigor, 
which — after all — I hardly expect to find. .Fish- 
ing is everywhere throughout this section re- 
ported bad, the unusually heavy spring freshets 
having done much damage, in the smaller 
streams especially. 



Can you give me a recipe for dyeing silk worm 
leaders a mist color ? 

W. D. Church. 

Ans. To stain leaders some persons use 
strong tea, others strong coffee, leaving in a suf- 
ficient time to take the color to such a degree as 
may be desired A good stain is obtained by 
boiling about 6 ounces extract of logwood in a 
quart of water, or 3 ounces in a pint. Soak the 
leaders in this about five minutes ; then put into 
the solution a piece of copperas about the size of 
a small egg or large walnut. Then wash and rub 
the leaders. The desired shade may be obtained 
by leaving the leaders in the solution a longer or 
a shorter time. 



I live, during the summer, at Mr. O. N. 
Thome's large farm house, i\ miles from Green- 
port, L. I., and close to the shore of Long 
Island sound, where I can breathe the salt air 
and sometimes catch blackfish, sea bass and por- 
gies. It is curious that I never knew a weak- 
fish or bluefish caught here by hook and line, 
though the nets often take them. 

Isaac McLellan. 

Greenport, L. I. 



Probably the largest jew-fish ever captured in 
Texas waters was seined recently in Corpus 
Christi bay. It weighed 
entrails had been removed. 
3 inches, and the largest 
body was 6 feet 3 inches. 



863 pounds after its 

Its length was 8 feet 

circumference of its 



Please change my address on your books to 
Blue Mountain Lake, New York, and send Rec- 
reation there until further notice. I like the 
magazine so well that I do not wish to be with- 
out it, even in the Adirondacks. 

J. C. Allen, 247 Decatur Street, Brooklyn. 



RECREA TION. 



99 




u. s. 



RAPID 
Shot Shell 




for 



Nitro 
Powders 



Penetration increased with pattern 15 per cent, improved. Results 

same with every shell. None so regular ever produced before. 

Head of shell and battery cup one piece of metal. No 

gas escape, no balling of shot, no upsetting of charge. 



U. S. CARTRIDGE CO 



AGENTS : 

U. T. HUNGERFORD, 

29 Chambers St., N. Y. City. 
CHAS. SONNTAG CO., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Lowell, Mass 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



Iowa Falls, la. 
Editor Recreation. 

In amateur photography, as well as in real 
life, I have found that experience is the best 
teacher. With all due credit to the text books 
on this subject. I must insist that the ideas 
and hints that one picks up in following the 
pleasing pastime s are of more real value than 
weeks of study of the theoretical side of photog- 
raphy. I think the majority of the amateurs 
will agree with me that after the fundamental 
principles of photography have been well learned, 
from the study of a good text book, from the 
pen of one who has "been through the mill," 
the manipulation of the various ingredients that 
go to make up the artistic whole, proves the best 
teacher. After a few months of the ups and 
downs of an amateur's life he can read appre- 
ciatingly many of the books and pamphlets on 
the subject. From my own experience, I found 
that to read a work on the art was of little bene- 
fit, as many of the terms and phrases were new 
to me and I had no idea of their meaning ; but 
since becoming acquainted with the subject by 
personal contact, so to speak, I find the numer- 
ous articles in the periodicals and elsewhere have 
a double interest, and I can peruse them under- 
standing^ and with some profii. 



Among the many readers of Recreation, a 
large number must be interested more or less in 
the art to which this department is devoted. 
Of such I would ask reports of their experiences 
and successes. A department of this character 
can be made most interesting and the readers of 
the magazine are asked to contribute or to ask 
questions that may aid in following the mazes 
through which a faithful " camera fiend" is led 
during; the summer season. 



The best grades of plates I find are the cheap- 
est in the long run. There is a temptation to 
cut down the cost of supplies ; but let it be in 
some other direction, for the best work cannot 
be done with poor materials. The plate is the 
basis of photography. If there is anything that 
will cause an amateur to " speak fluently," it is 
to find that a rare picture is marred by defect in 
the plate. This may occasion the total loss of a 
scene that cannot be duplicated, and even if it 
could the cost is increased at a terrible ratio. 



However few plates you may have, it seems to 
me that the average amateur cannot afford to do 
without a drying rack. I have often attempted 
to dry negatives hastily, but found that they 
were ruined or injured to such an extent as to 
mar the beaatv of the picture. A drying rack in 
a cool, dry place, in the hot weather, produces 
the best results. A few days ago, I placed a 
negative in the shade oi t he porch to dry, think- 
ing the motion of the air, out of doors, would 
quickly dry the film. When I went to look at 
it the sun's rays had struck the plate and 
the negative was ruined. The sun had acted 



upon the film in such a manner as to draw 
out some of the chemicals, leaving the film 
punctured with tiny holes. Besides the heat 
from the sun had caused the film to melt on the 
edges of the plate, completely obliterating the 
negative. 

* * * 

For the amateur, without the conveniences of a 
photographer's studio, I find a good arrange- 
ment for keeping the toning solution cold dur- 
ing the hot weather, is to set the toning tray in a 
dripping pan that is about twice as large as the 
tray, and in one end place a good sized piece of 
ice. The ice melting will surround the tray with 
cold water, thus keeping the tray and toning 
solution at the desired temperature. I find this 
superior to putting the ice in the solution itself, 
for in that case the melting ice gradually 
weakens the developer. 

* * * 

I have seen, somewhere, a formula for a solu- 
tion that would prevent films from curling. One 
ingredient was glycerine. Can any of the readers 
of Recreation tell me what the others are ? 

Amaturi Photographi. 



Editor Recreation. 



Sidney, Ohio. 



The woodcock photos you so greatly admire 
are not wholly my own work. The figure being 
that of the writer. I was compelled to have an 
assistant make the exposures. This part was 
performed by a brother — or rather cousin — 
amateur, Frank Woodmancy, one of your appre- 
ciative readers. 

I had often observed, when hunting in this 
locality, this ideal spot for a woodcock scene, 
and on the day these pictures were made, 
drove the eight miles solely for the purpose of 
making them. 

The grounds are not only ideal in appearance, 
but, in fact, as many fine bags have been made 
on this and near-by bogs. About sunrise, not 
many feet from where the pictures were made, 
a companion killed the first bird of a bag of 37 
woodcock, this number falling to two guns an 
hour before noon. 

E. P. Robinson. 



Some of the most remarkable colored slides 
ever produced are the work of Mr. and Mrs. 
Van Brunt, celebrated amateur photographers 
of New York. Their subjects have been 
chiefly flowers, and they have produced the 
most wonderful and delicate effects. Mr. and 
Mrs. Van Brunt have introduced these slides into 
the teaching of botany with great success. The 
coloring is done with a photographic retoucher's 
frame, the painter working by the aid of a watch- 
maker's microscopic lens. Aniline dyes, in water 
colors, are used and applied by fine brushes to 
the photographic film, which has been re-photo- 
graphed from the original negative on a sheet of 
glass. 



RECREA TION. 



vn 



THE FOLDING MONTAUK. '95 Prizewinner. 

The Folding Montauk combines the experience of our friends with other cameras and our own ingenuity to the end 
that it has all modern improvements and a number of new features. It has swings, adjustable front, etc., etc., <>f <>ur 
own design. In finish it surpasses all others, and is undoubtedly a thing of beauty ana a joy forever. 

Will make Snap Shots in all 

Kinds of Weather. 




There is Nothing: Equal to our 

Camera. Don't take the 

so-called .Just as (iood. 



PRICE. 

Fitted with Gundlach Double 

Rapid Kectilinear Lens 

and Shutter. 

For Pictures 4 x 5, 185.00 

5 x 7, 32.50 

6#x 8* , 50.00 

8 x 10, 75.00 



Pointer ! 



You may be certain of one 
thing, no Lens is equal to a 
ROSS, London made. If you 
can afford it have one fitted to 
your camera at once. 



Invitation. 

You are cordially invited to 
inspect our warerooms, the larg- 
est and handsomest in the world, 
and examine our complete stock 
of everything pertaining to pho- 
tography. 



C. GENNERT, 24 and 26 East Thirteenth Street, New York. 



fcr w S= 



pleasure in fcife 

— the delight of rolling through 
smooth, shady ways on a 
perfectly adjusted Columbia 
Bicycle. Costs but $100 
this year, We want you to ride. 




Boston 

New York 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

San Francisco 




POPE A\FG. CO. 

General Offices and Factories, HARTFORD, Conn. 

We shall take pleasure in sending you the 
handsomest Bicycle Catalogue etfi for 

postage— four cents; or the book isjr, efrom any 
Columbia agent. 



% 



Vlll 



RECREA TION. 



PUBLISHER'S DEPARTMENT. 

The Marlin Fire Arms Company, New 
Haven, Conn., calls attention to the new 25-36 
Marlin cartridge, designed for use in the Model 
1893 Marlin Repeater which can now be 
furnished for this calibre in all the various 
lengths and styles of barrel and magazine, 
straight and pistol grip, regular or take down. 
List prices for this calibre are the same as for the 
regular Model 1893 rifles, and are subject to the 
same discounts. The factory cartridge is loaded 
with 36 grains of powder and has a 106 grain 
bullet with metal patched sides and soft lead 
point ; but owing to the mechanism of the 
Marlin action, cartridges can be used varying in 
weight and length from the empty shell, as a 
minimum, up to the full sized cartridge as a 
maximum, thus allowing the use of varying pro- 
portions of powder and lead. 

Inasmuch as the action is the same, in take 
down form, barrel portions can be furnished for 
the 25-36, 32-40, and 38-55, all adjustable to the 
same action. 

The Marlin Company is now prepared to fill 
orders promptly for this as well as for all other 
goods in its line. 



The Ideal Manufacturing Co., New Haven, 
Conn., is now ready to furnish the number 3 
special and the number 6 regular reloading tools 
for the new 7 Marlin 25-36 cartridge. The bullet 
illustrated here has six grooves and weighs 104 
grains. It is said that the mixture of one part 
tin to about ten parts of lead produces the best 
results, Perfection moulds are also made that 
will enable the shooter to make heavier or lighter 
weight bullets as may be desired. Full descrip- 
tion of these tools and bullets may be found in 
the Ideal Hand-book, which will be sent to all 
who ask for it. 



The Overman Wheel Co. has made great im- 
provements in the manufacture of baseball 
masks ; they are making them out of better ma- 
terial than has ever been used heretofore by other 
makers. Victor masks are made of steel instead of 
cheap iron, and in consequence are much safer. 
Much may be expected from this company in the 
line of improvements in athletic goods. They 
have the reputation of using the finest materials 
only, and they sustain that reputation honestly. 
This is more than I can say of a certain other 
house in this line. 



G. W. Cole & Co. 

Dear Sirs : — I have used your ' ' Three-in- 
One " compound for some time and will say that 
it is the best material for a bicycle or gun I 
have ever used. I always had trouble keeping 
my gun clean of rust while about the bay or 
river, but now I leave it in the shanty sometimes 
for three weeks and never find a spot of rust on 
it, as I always clean it with "Three-in-One" after 
using. Respectfully, 

N. T. Slee, 

Baltimore, Md. 



You'll Have a Big 
Dentist's Bill Soon 

unless you use regularly 

Dr. Tarr's 
Creme Dentifrice 

In tubes, pleasant taste, more 

economical than powder or liquid 
Its antiseptic and prophylactic 
properties SAVE THE TEETH. 
Free sample for 2-cent stamp. Full 
6izetube at all druggists, 25 cents. 
Dr. W.W.Tarr's Creme Dentifrice Co. 
Dep't N 146 State St., Chicago 





■sy 



*p 



y 



__ A 

^0 SpoivTsj^aNJ: 

A> ShoKe. \ 

-^.Evtay outfit 

sHoUld INCLUDE a 

supply of this 
perfect!/ bleNded 

A 2oz, trial p*cta<je s«nf t>os r -f>*i4 f>r25c(i 

^ A\^rbur<) Bros. 

/Sim eric ^n Tobacco Co. Successor 
Baltimore Mc(. 



:three in onei 
IH-oomround +: 

FOR BICYCLES/GUNS. 
IPREVENTS RUST,CLEANS,LUBRICATES. 

flTS RUST PREVENTIVE QUALITIES ARE MARVELOUS' 

ASA LUBRICANT IT HAS NO EQUAL 
>ITS CLEANING PROPERTIES ARE UNSURPASSED 
DOES NOT EV APORAT E , GUM OR HARDEN. 

'&7> ALL DEALERS SELL IT. ^/ 
'\1>^ MANUFACTURED BY r^£/ { 

>Geo.W.Cole&Go.I11Broadway,NewYork. 

- SEND FIVE TWO CENT STAMPS FOR SAMPLE. 



RECREA TION. 



IX 




®\\\\\® 



1 >• v^^ # 



IS 




SMOKELESS POWDER 

has won the Summer Season at Hurlingham and the Gun Club 
nearly three times as much as any other single Powder and far 
more than all other Powders combined. A oroof of its perfect 
regularity and great penetration. 

THE AMERICAN a E. C" POWDER CO., Limited. 

OAKLAND, 
For Sale by all Dealers. BERGEN COUNTY, N. J. 



Q range "E xtra" P owder. 

PATENTED APRIL 17, 1888. 

THE BEST BLACK POWDER made for general shooting with sho'gun or rifle. 
Quick and strong, and burns with perfect combustion. VERY LITTLE SMOKE which 
is almost instantly dissipated. 

Oranp Liffhtniurr, Oranp Ductal, Oranp Special Powder. 



4 



'TROISDORF," 

Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 



Less Smoke, less Recoil, less Noise, and 
less Residuum than any Powder in use. 
It will not corrode the barrel of the gun. 
It is not explosive except when loaded in a 
shell and fired by a cap. 



LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO., 

New York Office, 29 MURRAY ST. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

St. Louis, Chicago, Cincinnati, Dubuque, Pittsburg, Baltimore. 

Nashville, Denver, Boston, New Orleans. 



^"Send postal card for illustrated pamphlet, showing sizes of grains of 
Powder. MAILED FREE. 



RECREATION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 

Recreation is a grand, good book. The 
picture on the front cover of the December num- 
ber seems to place me back in the woods, looking 
at the trophy — the reward of a hard day's chase 
after one of the greatest of American big game, 
the lordly moose. So perfect is the picture that 
it makes the sharp, whip-like crack of the rifle, 
whose leaden messenger of death laid the old 
monarch low, ring in my ears. I hope you will 
have many more such pictures. 

Frank T. Huntley, Oneida, N. Y. 



Although I am but a young sportsman I want 
to see you succeed with Recreation. Of all 
the sportsmen's publications I think Recrea- 
tion the ideal. I had not had the sample copy 
an hour until I went to the post-office and sent 
in my subscription. It was love at first sight. 
I have read your book, " Hunting in the Great 
West," and like it very much. 

Arthur M. Packer, Mulberry, Ind. 



I cannot say too much for Recreation. I had 
been reading other sportsmen's journals until I 
found Recreaton and then I stopped all others, 
for I think Recreation is far ahead of any- 
thing I have ever read, on my kind of sport. 
M. II. Wright, Urichsville, O. 



The current number of Recreation came to 
hand and to say I am pleased with it puts the 
case mildly. It is an ideal publication for all 
sportsmen and deserves the success with which 
it is meeting. I think every sportsman will agree 
with me after reading one copy of it. 

N. J. Cary, Utica, 111. 



Since the receipt of the first copy of Recrea- 
tion I have desired to express my appreciation 
of its great merit. It has enabled me to while 
away many hours delightfully. I hope you will 
consider me always a friend to both Recreation 
and its editor. 

Wm. H. Hundley, Greenbriar, Ala. 



Recreation is by far the best and most in- 
teresting magazine of its kind that I have seen. 
Enclosed find $1.00 for year's subscription. 

Will Fuller, Blenheim, Ont. 



Recreation is a model of beauty, elegance 
and taste. It is properly named. 

O. D. Lyon, Camp Clarke, Neb. 



I am delighted with Recreation. I have 
read your books and sketches, and know they 
are drawn from life. It is no trouble for an old 
campaigner to distinguish between an imaginary 
and a real picture. 

Dr. John W. Trader, " Occident." 



I think Recreation is the best periodical we 
have devoted to sports and pastimes. 

R. B. Eaton, Notch Hill, B. C. 



I think Recreation the best sportsmen's 
journal published and take great pleasure in rec- 
ommending it to my friends. 

E. A. Jackson. 



THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO OF 
THE WEST. 

The U. S. Fish Commission has recently pub- 
lished a paper on the ' ' Fishes of the Colorado 
Basin," by Barton W. Evermann and Cloud. 
Rutter, which gives a summary of our present 
knowledge of the fishes of that basin. 

Although the Colorado is an immense river, 
draining more than 225,000 square miles of terri- 
tory, the total number of different species of 
fishes known to inhabit it and its tributaries is 
but thirty-two. These represent five families as 
follows : Catostomida, or Suckers, 8; Cyprinidce, 
or Minnow family, 19 ; Salmonidce, 2 ; Pcecili- 
idce or Top-minnows, 2 ; and Cottida, or Blobs, 1. 

The species of most interest to the angler are 
the Colorado Trout {Salmo my kiss pleuritic us), 
Williamson's Whitefish {Coregonus williamsoni,) , 
and one of the Minnows (Ptychocheilus lucius). 

The Colorado Trout possesses game qualities 
of a very high order, as Mr. F. D. Sanford or 
any one else who has ever gone " trouting on the 
Gunnison " can testify. The writers also know 
through personal experience in 1889, that in 
Eagle river, near Gypsum and the Rio Florida, 
near Durango, the trout are as game as in the 
Gunnison. Williamson's Whitefish is a wary, 
dainty biter, slow to take the hook, but when 
once he has made up his mind to strike, he will 
give the angler some real sport. 

But the game fish of the Colorado is the min- 
now — the " White Salmon" of the local angler. 
None of the species of the minnow family east of 
the Rockies reaches a weight of more than a 
couple of pounds, the largest one being the fall- 
fish or chub {Semotilus bullaris), which reaches 
a length of eighteen inches, and, according to 
Thoreau, " tastes like brown paper salted." But 
its relative, the "White Salmon "or " Colorado 
Pike," which is, of course, no salmon nor pike 
at all, but only a minnow, attains a length of 5 
or 6 feet and a weight of 80 pounds or even 
more. And he thereby proves that a "minnow 7 " 
is not necessarily a little fish. 

Will he bite a hook ? And has he any game 
qualities? Well, — you who have experienced the 
savage " snap" and the reckless " rush " of the 
fall-fish, the chub or the jerker, will have some 
conception of what a Colorado Pike is like, if you 
imagine what a fall-fish, chub or jerker of 80 
pounds weight could do ! 

The extreme paucity of the fish-fauna of the 
Colorado is remarkable. Only 32 species in a 
fairly well- watered territory of 225,000 square 
miles. A single haul with a 30-foot seine in 
Bean Blossom, a small creek near Bloomington, 
Indiana, brought to shore exactly as many dif- 
ferent kinds of fishes. 

And the Wabash basin, which contains but 
33,7 2 5 square miles, is known to have at least 
130 ; and not a single species is common to 
these two river basins, — the faunas are entirely 
distinct. The spiny-rayed fishes, the basses, 
sunfishes and darters, and the catfishes, have not 
a single representative in the Colorado basin, but 
in the Wabash thev constitute a large and im- 
portant part of the fish-fauna of that region. 



I prefer Recreation to any of the higher 
priced publications. O. F. Bike. 



RECREATION. 



XI 



Premo 
Camera 



BEST FOR THE SPORTSMAN. 

Owing to its extreme compactness, portability and ease of manipu- 
lation, the PREMO, is especially adapted for the use of all 
Sportsmen. Just think of a complete 4x5 Camera, measuring 
only 4%x5^x6K inches, and weighing but two pounds. The 
IDEAL CAMERA for Tourists, Bicyclists, Canoeists, Camping 




Parties, etc. 
SEND FOR 

PREMO PAMPHLET 

Giving Full Particulars. 



Rochester Optical Co., 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




There is a best in every thing, and particularly in loaded shells. There is 
one element that enters into the make-up of cartridges that few shooters give much thought 
to ; this element is brains. Brains cost money wherever found, and brains arc an all- 
important factor in a perfectly loaded shell. 

A cartridge machine does not possess brains, consequently machine-loaded shells 
rarely be depended upon, some shells shooting too strong and some not strong enough. A 
boy does not possess much brains, consequently even hand-loaded shells — loaded by boys 
— often go wrong. 

We pay a higher price for brains, in our loading room, than any other house in the 
country, and always have. Our loaders are experts, and all the loading is done under the 
direct supervision of Mr. Frank Lawrence, who is probably the most expert shell loader in 
the country. 

Formerly our net price to dealers and clubs, for our cheapest shells, was $25, but in order 
to very largely increase our sales in this department, we have reduced the price to Si 9.4' >. 

Our shells at this price are not to be confounded for a moment with other $2.00 shells, 
loaded carelessly by boys, and put back in the boxes the empty shells came in. 

Squires' Hand-Loaded Shells are all packed either 25 in an elegantly lithograph 
or 100 in a handsome wooden box, or will be packed in japanned tin carrying 
a 1,000 extra. 

We want you to try a sample hundred or so, or if you are a dealer, a sample thousa 
or so. We want you to send for them to-day, this very hour, this minute, in tact, while it 
is fresh in your mind. Remember, that besides powder and shot and wads, we give yot> 
brains, and brains are scarce. 

HENRY C. SQUIRES & SON, 20 Cortlandt Street, New York. 



Xll 



R EC RE A TION. 



Marsters has Worms! 

Sand Worms, 12c. a doz. 

White or Blood Worms, 25c. a doz. 



I am with you again with lower prices for 
Fishing Tackle. I find by experience that put- 
ting down the prices and increasing the quality 
increases my business every year. 

SPLIT BAMBOO FLY OR BASS RODS, 98c, 
all nickel mounted, solid reel seats, silk whip- 
ped, etc., complete in wood form and cloth bag. 

HARD RUBBER AND NICKEL MULTIPLY- 
ING REELS, balance handle, etc., 40 yds., 68c; 
60 yds., 78c; 80 yds., 88c; 100 yds., g8c. 

EXTRA FINE NICKEL-PLATED MULTIPLY- 
ING REELS, balance handle, click and drag, 
40 yds., 58c; 60 j ds. ,68c; 80 yds., 78c ; 100 yds., 
88c; 150 yds., 98c. 

SINGLE GUT LEADERS, mist color, 1 yd., 20c. 
doz. ; 2 yds., 40c. doz. ; 3 yds., 60c doz. 

TROUT FLIES, 16c doz. 

BASS AND PICKEREL SPOONS, 5c each. 

BRAIDED OIL SILK LINES, No. G, 25 yds., 19c; 
50 yds., 35c; 100 yds.,7oc. No. F, 25 yds., 25c; 
50 yds., 50c; 100 yds., 95c. 

Send 2c stamp for 74 page Illustrated Cata- 
logue and Special List No. 4. 

JAMES F. MARSTERS, 

51, 53 and 55 Court Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



THE KITTATINNY, 




Delaware Water Cap, 
Monroe Co., Pa. 

Open from May 1st until November. 

This popular Spring, Summer and Autumn 
Resort is less than three hours from New York, 
via D., L. & W. R. R. It is celebrated for 
grandeur of its scenery and healthfulness. Pleas- 
ant walks, drives, beating, bathing and fishing. 
The hotel is the largest and most attractively 
'ocated in the Delaware valley. Modern ap- 
pointments, including elevator, steam heat, rooms 
en suite, with bath, etc. Send for booklet. 

W. A. BRODHEAD & SONS. 



Mr. C. E. Phillips, Carverton, Pa., writes 
to the Davenport Arms Co. as follows : " Our 
gun club recently held a clay bird shoot, at 
which I broke 29 out of a possible 30 with a '94 
Model, 12 gauge Davenport gun. The only 
miss I made was owing to a faulty spring of the 
trap. My score beat all the other guns in the 
match, of whatever make or price." 



G. W. Cole & Co., 11 1 Broadway, New York, 
make a lubricant for guns and other metal im- 
plements, that is worthy the attention of all 
sportsmen. I have been using it on some of my 
old, back number guns that are badly rusted, 
and on some of my good rifles. It cleans the 
one and keeps the other clean. Furthermore 
it is. long lived, retaining its hold on the metal 
for weeks, in both damp and hot weather. Send 
10 cents, get a sample and try it. It is called "3 
in one." 



Henry Milward & Sons, 297 Broadway, 
New York, say their advertisement in Recrea- 
tion is bringing them orders for their inimitable 
flies from all over the United States and terri- 
tories, and from all parts of Canada. Subse- 
quent mails bring from nearly every purchaser 
the most flattering endorsements of these new 
flies. If you have not tried them send for a 
sample dozen, and see how they will entice the 
wary big fellows from their hiding places. 



Subscribe to Recreation, $1.00 a year, 
will find it a good investment. 



You 



The Marlin Arms Company is sending 
out a new edition of its playing cards. They 
are made of fine linen — in fact are such cards as 
sell in the trade at 50 cents to 75 cents a pack — 
yet the company sells these at 10 cents. It is a 
good plan to take a pack of these when you go 
into camp, so that you can play a game of 
freeze-out at night, to see who shall get up and 
get breakfast the next morning. 



I can never fail to think of you when I look at 
my beautiful gun. I will confess that before I 
received it, visions of mounted gas-pipes were 
floating through my mind, but I wish to say 
right here that the Hollenbeck is a beauty in 
every respect, and I shall always feel myself your 
debtor for sending me such an elegant premium 
for the 35 subscriptions I sent you. 

E. A. Corey, Geneva, Ohio. 



G. W. Cole & Co., in Broadway, New 
York, distributed 2000 sample bottles of their 
3 in- 1 compound among the German riflemen at 
Glendale Park, during the great Scheutzenbund. 
It is safe to say that all the rifles used there will 
be bright and clean for the next six months at 
least. 



I want you to reach 20,000 circulation before 
fall. If you do half as well in other places as 
you have done in Elgin, you will have 40,000 
subscribers by that time. 

Fred. M. Adams, Elgin, 111. 



RECREA TION. 



xm 



THE "DAVENPORT" SINGLE GUN. 

MODEL '94. EJECTOR. 




Oas detachable barrel, with heavy lug securely bolted, and having extra strong screw key fastening. Frame 
11 either nickel-plated or casehardened, top snap action, rebounding lock, automatic ejector positive in action 
and perfectly reliable, drop forged steel parts, extra heavy fine steel barrels, 30 inch, carefully choke bored, finely 
checkered pistol grip stock, rubber butt plate and fancy checkered fore-end. Thoroughly high grade in finish and 
detail. Furnished in 12, 16 and 20 gauge. Weight, s 3 A to t l / 2 lbs. 
This and other standard shot guns and rifles, made by 

THE W. H. DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO., 



Send for Catalogue. 



NORWICH, CONN. 



Ejector Guns 
no longer a 
luxury. 




TENS OF THOUSANDS IN USE. 

Send for Catalogue. 

LEFEVER ARMS CO., 

[Mention Recreation.] 



GOOD NEWS FOR SPORTSMEN. 

Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 
within the reach of every sportsman. 
Our New Ejector Movement 
Has only two pieces: One in the 
Hammer, One in 
the Frame. 

We have decided to meet 
the demand tor medium price 
Ejectors, and are now pre- 
pared to accept orders for 
all grades of our hammerless 
guns fitted with Ejectors. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



Date, 18B 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 216 William St., New York. 
Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send me UECRK<1TU)X 
for one year. 

Name 

jYo Street, P. 0. 

County, State, 

Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT AND SEND IN. 



XIV 



RECREATION. 



James Fullerton, practical mountaineer 
and guide, Ten Sleep, Wyoming. Elk, sheep, 
deer, bear, lions, antelope, grouse and trout, 
all within 15 miles of my ranch. Would ac- 
commodate a few boarders at our ranch, on No 
Wood river, at the foot of the Big Horn 
Mountains. My wife is an expert in the cook- 
ing of game and fish, and we have plenty of 
garden truck, milk, butter, eggs, and wild fruits 
in season. Grand climate, superb scenery. 
Correspondence solicited. 

W. L. Winegar, hunter and guide, Elgin, 
Fremont county, Idaho. Tourists and Hunt- 
ing parties outfitted and conducted through the 
Rocky Mountains and the Yellowstone National 
•Park. Big game of all kinds abundant. Satis- 
factory service or no charge. References: 
W. B. Bogert, 96 Board of Trade, Chicago. 
J. B. Nelligar, 72 State street., Chicago. 

Ed. H. Trafton, Hayden, Fremont Co., 
Idaho. Hunter and guide for Teton Basin, 
Jackson's Hole and the National Park. In the 
heart of the big game country. Satisfactory ser- 
vice and shots at game or no pay. References : 
Dean Sage, Albany, N. Y. ; S. D. Webster, 
Chattanooga, Tenn.; W. C. McKinny, Dallas, 
Texas. 

Frank Petersen, mountaineer and guide, 
takes out hunting parties and tourists to Yellow- 
stone Park. Prices to suit the times. Address, 
Marysvale, Uinta Co., Wyoming. 

From the President of the Agassiz Association, Harlan 
II. Ballan, A. M. 

"It is the finest book on American birds issued since 
Audubon's, and is pronounced by some authorities superior 
to that now rare and costly work." 

THE BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA. 

One Hundred and Nineteen Plates 12 x 15 Ins. 
Over 800 Birds Brawn and Colored From Life. 

Includes all our species, artistically reproduced in all their 
shades of color, true to natural plumage and botanical sur- 
rounding; with a copious text embracing the observations 
made by thejiiost eminent writers on Ornithology. The work 
is a superb Imperial quarto, and is sold at net prices as follows: 

In Fine Half Bindings, $40; in Full, $45; Russia, 
Duck or Morocco, gold edges. 

ISSUED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF 

THE NATURAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, 
114 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK. 

" A wonderful work."— Good Citizen. 

" A Great Work."— National Teacher. 

" A magnificent Ornithological work."— Turf, Field & Farm. 

" A magnificent work, equal to ' Audubon's Birds,' giving all 
the birds of North America, with elaborate plates in natural 
colors accompanied by descriptions."— Education, Boston. 

" If artistic and beautifully colored plates, letter-press of the 
highest order, and scientific knowledge reduced to the plainest 
te-ras can make up a valuable work, this certainly deserves 
that designation." — American Sportsman. 

From Dr. Elliott Coues, President of the American 
Ornithologists' Union, Author of "Birds of the North- 
west," "Colorado Valley," "Key to North American 
Birds," etc. 

"lean heartily recommend the whole work as one admir- 
ably meeting the design of a popular ornithology of North 
America at once instructive and entei taining, at a reasonable 
price. The text is perfectly reliable. The technical nomen- 
clature is correct, being that used by the best ornithologists 
of the country. 

From Right Rev.Bishop A.Cleveland Cox, D.D..LL.D. 

" For a family of intelligent children, here is a book which 
may furnish a never-failing fountain of interest and entertain- 
ment. I count him a happy man who can afford to lay It 
before his family and his guests. How pure, how ennobling 
such a study ! It may prompt youthful genius to further re- 
searches in these fields ; and if it tempts a young girl to try 
her hand at drawing or coloring such portraits of our feath- 
ered visitors and co-citizens for purposes of domestic orna- 
ment, it will be a happy result. I recommend this book to 
purchasers— a very rare sort of a commendation from me." 

From Prof. C. 8. Maynard, Author of " The Birds of 
Florida," and "Birds of Eastern North America." 

" I am much pleased with ' Studer's Birds of North America.' 
In the grouping of the birds, arangement of light and shade 
in the perspective and delineations of the forms and feathers, 
Dr. Jasper has certainly surpassed all other artists, producing 
the best pictures of the species which I have ever seen." 



Nelson Yarnall, hunter and guide, Dubois, 
Wyoming. Am perfectly familiar with the 
mountain country to the south and east of Yellow- 
stone National Park. Am prepared to furnish 
complete outfits, and conduct hunting parties in 
first-class style. Best of references from both 
military men and civilians. 

Ira Dodge, mountaineer and guide. Collec- 
tor of wild animals. Cora, Wyoming. Com- 
plete Transportation outfits furnished. Hunt- 
ing parties and National Park excursionists. 
Correspondence solicited. 

I have no hesitation in saying that Recrea- 
tion is the best magazine of its class. 
John N. Hall, M. D., President Denver 
and Arapahoe Medical Society, Denver, Colo. 

Enclosed please find $io, for which send Rec- 
reation 6ne year to each of the following. *** 

All I had to do was to show the magazine and 
take in the dollars. Every one was pleased with 
it. Please forward copies as soon as possible, 
for subscribers are anxious to have them. 

Emory Comstock, San Marcial, N. M. 



Recreation has the most merit of any pub- 
lication of its kind and fills a long felt want. 

J. H. Wheeler. 



I have read all your books. If you ever write 
any more let me know. I don't want to miss 
any of them. W. B. Bogert, Chicago. 

M. R. PERKINS, 

SHERIDAN, WYOMING, 

Keeps a full arid complete line of 

Guns, Cartridges, 

FISHING TACKLE, 

tents, 

Saddles, Harness, Horse Clothing, 

and everything in the line of 

SPORTSMEN'S SUPPLIES. 

Tourists and Sportsmen visiting the Yellowstone 
Park, or the Great Hunting Grounds of Wyoming, can 
find here everything needed, in the way of an outfit, 
at eastern prices with freight added. 



All Kinds of Large and Small Game. 
Excellent Mountain Trout Fishing. 



Guides, Teams, Saddle and Pack Animals 
Furnished. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



R EC RE A TION. 



xv 



St. Paul, Minn. 
" Big Game of North 
America," and "Hunt- 
ing in the Great West," 
came to hand in due time. 
I am delighted with them. 
I advise every reader of 
Recreation to procure 
the requisite number of 
subscribers and secure 
copies of these books. I 
merely placed a copy of 
Recreation on my desk 
and took the necessary 
subscriptions in a short 
time without any trouble. 
H. E. Perry. 



New Formula 
Trap Powder 

A powder for those that cannot afford to 
shoot Nitro, and who still want something 
better and quicker than common Black 
Powder. 

Send for Testimonials for 
New Formula. 

Mention Recreation. 



Send for Catalogue of Sporting Goods. 
You find ioo pages of interesting 
matter. 

WM. R. BURKHARD, 

57 & 59 East Seventh St. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Headquarters for Sporting Goods. 
Hand loaded Shells a Specialty. 



DRY MATCHES! 

IN THE 

Perfection Water -Proof 

Matchbox. 




Indispensable to sportsmen who hunt, fish, trap, 
camp, or sail. 

Size, 2% inches long, % inch diameter, beautifully 
nickel plated. Price $i, postage prepaid. Order at once. 

You can fill this box with matches, lay it in water 
over night and the next morning they will light as if 
they had been kept in a powder magazine. 

J. R. PAINTER, 

Manufacturer and Importer of Musical 
Boxes, Etc. 

1229 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phollon'o Adapted to any business or profession, 
5£UsllSl^i ruled with printed headings, and indexed 

Pnntropt anrf throu & n to rec i uire the leas t possible 

UUnildUl dllU writing to enter data and refer 



Correspondence 



time and money. 
Qoonfflo re -° r dered. All kinds of 

CHALLEN, Publisher. 165 Broadway, N. Y, 



5,000 used and 
kinds of Labor-Saving 
Records on hand or made to order. 



The Ideal Boot and Shoe for Still Hunting. 

ABSOI^UXEI^Y NOISI.MSS. 

Uppers made of best quality heavy Horse Hide, 
tanned and finished same as Buck or Moose leather ; 
soft as a glove, tough enough to stand the wear and 
tear of briars and brush ; no exposure to repeated wet- 
tings will ever harden. By a peculiar and new process 
the upper is rendered entirely waterproof. The experi- 
ence and suggestions of 
many critical and intelli- 
gent hunters combined, has 
resulted in the production 
of this, 

The Ideal Hunter's Shoe. 

The bottom is wide, made 
up of two electric soles, 
rubber cemented together, 
half an inch thick. 

Impervious to Wet. 
Will not glaze and slip. 
Electric sole is a new pro- 
cess tanned Cow Hide, 
flexible and easy as a moccasin, as substantial as a 
Stoga Boot, and exceedinly light weight : all the 
parts are put together in workmanlike manner, hand- 
stitched, perfect in every detail, neat in appearance, 
suitable for any occupation requiring absolute comfort 
in tramping or exposure. 

The Lace Shoe is 10 inches high, eyelets and studs. 
bellows tongue lined throughout with rubber cloth, 
porous, will not sweat. 

The Boot is 18 inches high, laced instep, and laced 
at top outside to tighten to the leg. 

Will send this IDEAL LACE SHOE to any 
address by express prepaid, on receipt of $7.50. The 
IDEAL BOOT on receipt of $10. If made to meas- 
ure, will deliver in 10 days. 

First class sporting goods houses are invited to send 
for samples and terms. 

M. A. SMITH. Manufacturer of Shoe Specialties. Gym- 
nasium & Sporting Shoes, 25-27 N. 13th 8t., Phila., Fa. 




XVI 



RECREA TION. 



TAXIDERMISTS SUPPLIES. 

ARTIFICIAL GLASS EYES 

For Stuffed Birds and Animals. 

Oologist's and Entomologist's Supplies. 

Send 2c. stamp for Taxidermist's Catalogue to 

FRED. KAEMPFER, Taxidermist, 

217 Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

All specimens of natural history prepared and 
mounted true to nature in the best style of art and 
at reasonable prices. 

Sulphite Soda 

PUREST MADE ON EARTH T 

Forms : — 

Large Crystals, 




. . YOU KNOW . . 

WALROLE HYRO! 

WELL, OUR SULPHITE IS JUST AS FINE I 



Small Crystals (New Process), 



SAMPLE. - FIVE CENTS 
(stamps) 



Powdered (Anhydrous), 

Sometimes called Granular. 



Walpole Chemical Co., 



(Business founded 1870.) 

WALPOLE, MASS. 



v__ 



J 



G. GENNERT, 24 EAST 13th STREET, NEW YORK, 

EASTERN AND SOUTHERN TRADE AGENTS. 




HENRY MILWARD & SONS, 

FisH Hoo^s, 

Hooks on Gut, Gut Leaders, Cork Floats, Etc. 

WE HAVE SECURED SOLE RIGHTS AND ENTIRE CONTROL OF THE 

''INIMITABLE" TROUT AND BASS FLIES. 

These Flies have the best imitation of the natural wings ever offered. 
Wings are waterproof, buoyant, flexible, very tenacious and not affected by the solar rays. 

If your Local Dealer has not these Flies send for Sample Dozen. 

Inimitable Trout Flies, $i.oo per doz. Inimitable May Flies, $1.25 doz. Inimitable Bass Flies, $1.50 doz. 

If not fully to your satisfaction money will be refunded on receipt of returned gx>ods. 

NO CATALOGUE. LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE. 

C. B. FITZ MA URICE, 

Broadway , New York. United States Representative. 



RECREATION. 



X V 1 1 



fl KATS it 



They're all talking about it, 

and they say it's a dandy. 
THE "IDEAL" 

LOADING MACHINE 

Is the only one that will handle all kinds of powder correctly. 
idkal HAND BOOK, No. 5, just out. 80 pages of solid in- 
formation on loading shells, etc. Stamps for postage acceptable. 
IDEAL MFG. CO., Drawer 86 New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 




LOOK 

AT THE 

PRICE. 



[Mention Recreation.] 



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BOOKS BY 6. 0. SHIELDS. (COQUINA.) 



THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA. 

Its Habits, Habitat, Haunts, and Characteristics. How, When and 
Where to Hunt it. 

8vo, 600 Pages, SO Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5.00. 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES. 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur Photography, Hunting 

and Fishing, with Special Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, 

the Buffalo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 

Deer ; also on Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; on a 

Montana Roundup ; Life among the Cowboys, 

etc. 

12mo, 300 Pages, 75 Illustrations. Cloth, $2 ; Half Morocco, $3. 

AMERICAN GAME FISHES. 

How, When and Where to Angle for Them. 
8to, 400 Pages, 50 Illustrations. Cloth, $2.50 ; Half Morocco, $4.00. 



HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST. 

(RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES.) 

Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and Stream. 
12mo Cloth. Over 300 Pages, Illustrated. Price, 75 Cents. 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG. 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics, Utility, Breeding, 

Training, Diseases, and Kennel Management of 

all Breeds of Dogs. 

8 to, 650 Pages, 100 Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5 ; 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS. 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sportsmen. 
12mo, 200 Pages, 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 



THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE. 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with the Nez Perce Indians 
in the Big Hole Basin, Montana, August 9, 1877. 
12mo. 150 Pages, Profusely Illustrated. Cloth, $1. 



These books will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the 
author. 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

216 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK. 



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XV111 



RECREATION. 



Stock part detached 
from barrel. 




Action Open, ejecting 
Shell. 



a 





THE "BURGESS" GUN 

12 ga. Repeating Shot-Gun. 

Latest, Quickest, Simplest, Safest. 

The ideal action. Movement in direct line between 
points of support. Double hits in 1-8 second ; three hits 
in one second ; six hits in less than three seconds. 

Address for circulars, 

BURGESS GUN CO., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Send 5c to pay postage 
on 1895 

Illustrated 
Catalogue of 
Angling Goods. 



The. 

"Chubb" 

Trade 

Mark. 



Fishing Rods and Fine Fishing Tackle. 

Address, T. H. CHUBB ROD CO., 

Please Mention Recreation. POST MILLS, VT 

"DIETZ" 

TUBULAR HUNTING LAMP. 

PATENTED. 

Looks like a locomotive head-light. 

It will not blow nor jar out. 

The hood over the front works perfectly and with- 
out noise. When the hood is down no. light escapes. 

It will throw a powerful light 200 feet. 

It burns kerosene oil, and will burn ten-hours with- 
out re-tilling. 

11 INCHES HIGH. 8 INCHES IN DIAMETER. WEIGHT 2 1-2 UBS. 

It is compact and handsome. Has a bail and can 
be used as a hand and wall lantern in camp. Gives a 
brilliant light, and is absolutely safe. 

Price $4.00. 

Will be sent by mail or express, prepaid, anywhere 
in the United States or Canada, on receipt of price and 
50 cents for postage or expressage. 

R. E. DIETZ CO., 60 LAIGHT ST, NEW YORK. 




Do You Know? 

that the 

HANNAFORD 

VENTILATED RUBBER BOOTS 

are "worn at all seasons with. 




Absolute Comfort. 

NO SWEATING. 

Ask your dealer for them, 
or send for catalogue. 

HANNAFORD 
VENTILATED' 
BOOT CO,, 79 MILK ST., BOSTON. 

" WEBSTER'S 

INTERNA TIONAL 

DICTIONARY 



New front 
Cover to Cover. 



MMCHESTERWT 




Successor of the 
"Unabridged." 

A Dictionary of 
English, 
Geography, 
Biography, 
Fiction, I$tc. ; 

Standard of theXJ. S. 
Gov't Printing Office.the J 
U.S. Supreme Court and < 
of nearly all the School- < 
books. 



Hon.D. J. Brewer, 
Justice of the U. S. 
Supreme Court, writes : 
I commend it to all as< 
the one great standard authority. 

Send for free pamphlet containing specimen pages. 

G. & C. MERRIAM CO., Publishers, 

Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 

03- Do not buy reprints of ancient editions. 



POCO 



The smallest and most complete 4x5 Camera made. 
ALL ADJUSTMENTS. 



<D 
<D 

i~ 
U. 



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bo 


O 



ROCHESTER CAMERA MFG. CO., 

21 Aqueduct Sq„ ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

For Prices on the Best and Most 
Comfortable 

SLEEPING BAG 

ever made, write or call on 
S. HEMENWAY &; SON, 

60 South St., New York City. 




RECREATION. 



.\ i x 



SPORTSMEN'S 
Camping and Fishing 

TENTS. 

YACHT AND CANOE SAILS 

FLAGS AND BURGEES, 

Canvas Covers, and Camp Furniture 
of every description. 



8. HEMMENWAY & SON, 

60 South St., NEW YORK CITY. 

Send 5-cent stamp for our Tent and Flag Catalogue. 

Scovill's 

NEW IATERBDRY 

Camera. 

Containing (new) safety shutter, 
view finder, (new) focusing ad- 
justment, three (3) double plate 
holders. Leather covered. All 
for $15. 

4x5 Size. 

Send for complete descriptive circular to 

Scovill & Adams Co., 

423 Broome Street, New York. 



FOR SALE, 



Red Irish Setter, Nat Elcho. 
(Nat Glencho by Bessie 

Gauge.) Registered. 2 ^ 

years old. Prize winner. Perfect coat, form and 
leather, very dark color, no white. Splendid nose. 
Obedient and tractable. Fast, wide ranger. Nat is 
as perfect a specimen as is in the Northwest. He has 
no faults and is well worth $200.00. Will sell him for 
$35.00 if taken at once. 

J. C. NATTRASS, 

New Whatcom, Wash. 



^y^OMEN WHO TRAVEL 

BETWEEN- 
NEW YORK and BOSTON 

WILL FIND IT PAYS TO USE THE 

Norwich Line. 



It is the INSIDE ROUTE and avoids rough 
water, attendant upon a trip via outside lines. 

One of the fine steamers "City of Lowell." 
new, or "City of Worcester," leaves New York. 
Pier 40, North River, 5.30 p m., every week- 
day, connecting at New London with New Yes- 
tibuled Steamboat Express Train, with Parlor 
Cars attached, for Boston, Worcester and points 

North and East. 

Promenade Concerts on steamers every evening. 

Excellent Table d'Hote Dinner served on leav- 
ing New York, at low rate of 75c. 

Staterooms $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00. Berths 
free. 

Ticket Offices : 353 Broadway, 

Pier 40, North River, New York. 

G. W. BRADY, Supt. 

GEO. F. RANDOLPH, Gen'l Traffic Manager. 

W. R. BABCOCK, General Passenger Agent. 

The Wabash Railroad 

Forms an importaat link with all lines from the 
EAST to all points WEST, NORTHWEST and 
SOUTHWEST. 

The ONLY Through Sleeping Car Line 
from New York and Boston to St. Louis 
via NIAGARA FALLS. 
Leave New York (Grand Cent. Sta.) daily, 6 p. m. 
Leave Boston (FitchburgR.R. Sta.) daily, 3 p. m. 
All meals served in Dining Cars. 

Through Sleeping Cars from New York and 
Boston to Chicago leave New York, West Shore 
R. R., daily 6 p. m. and 8 p. m. ; leave Boston, 
Fitchburg R. R. Station, daily 3 p. m. and 7 p. m. 

It is the most direct line between the follow- 
ing points : Toledo or Detroit and St. Louis and 
Kansas City ; Detroit and Chicago ; Chicago 
and St. Louis ; St. Louis and Kansas City and 
Omaha. 

Solid Yestibuled Trains, Unsurpassed Dining 
Cars, Reclining Chair Cars (seats free) on all 

through trains. 

All transfers in St. Louis for Kansas City, 
Omaha, St. Joseph, Denver, Colorado Sprii 
Texas, Mexico and California points made in the 
NEW UNION DEPOT at that point. 

For further information in regard to rates, etc., 
apply to 

H. B. McCLELLAN, Gen'l Eastern Agent, 
387 Broadway, New York. 

Chas. M. Hays, C S. Crank, 

Vice-Pres. & Gen'l Mgr. Gen'l Pass. & Ticket Agt. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



XX 



RECREA TION. 



THE ONLY PERFECT FISHING LINE 



IS THE 



—Natchaug ~~ 
Braided Silk Line 



Made from the choicest stock braided i.6-strand three-cord silk. They "will outwear 
three ordinary lines. Spool perfectly when in use. 

Never flatten or become water soaked. 

THE NATCHAUG WATERPROOF BAIT AND FLY LINES 

"Will float on the water. The finish cannot be broken. Those who have used them will have no 
others. Send four cents for samples and prices and pamphlet containing our awards of prizes for 
last season. FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS. Manufactured by 



THE NATCHAUG SILK CO., Willimantic, Conn. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 213-215 FIFTH AVENUE. 



Ten Sleep, Wyo. 

I am delighted with 
the -results of my adver- 
tisement in Recreation. 
Letters are still pouring 
in, all beginning "your 
ad. in Recreation." If 
all your advertisers are 
flooded with correspond- 
ence as I am, your 
space will soon be at a 
high premium. 

James Fullerton. 



The Only Complete Service. 

The Only Direct Route. 

The Only Drawing-room Cars, 



AND THE 



Only Through Solid Trains 



To all points in the 



CATSKILL 

MOUNTAINS 

Is via the 

Ulster & Delaware, 
Stony Clove and 

Kaaterskill R'ds. 

Send 6 cents postage for Summer Book, to 

N. A. SIMS, 
Gen'l Passenger Agent, 

RONDOUT, N. Y. 






R EC RE A TION. 



xxi 



/ZNTEM/NG & ///Gf/LAWS ^ 
/f/SrOMC //(/DSON R/VERjz, 

^y on Ihe 

N£W YORK (ENTRAL. 

150 MILES OF UNPARALLELED pEpXhy 








THIS IS ONE OF THE MANY REASONS 
FOR CALLING THE NEW YORK CENTRAL 
"AMERICAS GREATEST RAILROAD' 




COPYRIGHT, 1896, BY GEORGE H, DANIELS, GENERAL PASSENGER AGENT, FOR THE NEW YORK CENTRAL A HUDSON RIVER RAI.ROA&. 



xxn 



RECREA TION. 



FOPtEH^lSTID -^R-iMIS OO.'S 



LATEST MODEL 



Ejector and Non-Ejector Hammerless Double Gun. 




We challenge competition in Beauty, Workmanship, Simplicity of^Mechanism, Shooting 
Qualities and Price. We target all of our guns with nitro powder. 

For Catalogue, address FOREHAND ARMS CO., Worcester, Mass. 



The Lakes and Streams of 

Wisconsin and 
Michigan 



ABOUND IN 



Muskallonge, Black Bass and Trout. 

Reduced Rate 
Excursion Tickets 



The North-Western Line, 

Chicago & North-Western Ry. 
For maps, illustrated pamphlets and detailed information, apply to 




H. A. GROSS, General Eastern Passenger Agent, 423 Broadway, New York, 

or address W. B. KNISKERN, General Passenger and Ticket Agent, Chicago, 111. 



RECREATION. 



xxin 




Having purchased the entire stock of Guns of the 

WILKES-BARRE GUN CO., 

we offer them at the following low prices : 

Hammer Gun, Fine Twist Barrels List, $35.00 , our price, $17 50 

Hammerless Gun, Fine Twist Barrels " 50.00 ; " 31 .50 

Hammerless Gun, Damascus Barrels " 60.00; " 3500 

All guns latest model, 12 gauge, 7 to 8 pounds, bored for Nitro Powders. 

EVERY GUN FULLY GUARANTEED. 

If in need of a gun it will pay you to buy one of these and order at once. 

SCHOVERLING, DALY & GALES, 

302 Broadway, New York. 

Spencer Repeating H>hot Qrun. 

BEST IN THE WORLD. SIX SHOTS IN THREE SECONDS 

Twist Steel Barrel Case Hardened System. 




Lincoln, Neb., May 21, 1S92. 
Dear Sir : — I have used a Spencer Repeating Shot Gun for eight years. I have fired many 
thousands of shots with it, and it is apparently in as good condition to-day as it was when I pur- 
chased it. Several years ago a friend of mine, now residing in this city, stood by my side and saw 
me kill six prairie chickens out of a covey that arose simultaneously, shooting each bird separately. 
For any kind of shooting from jack snipe to geese, I prefer the Spencer to any gun I have ever used. 

Yours very truly, J. E. HOUTZ. 



HERMANN BOKER & CO, 101-103 Duane St, N. L Wholesale Agts. 



J 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR 

Also Wholesale Agents for Hollenbeck Guns. See page xxii. 



Mention Recreation. 



XXIV 



RECREA TION. 



rry 



The 6 M. JVf. BLAKE 




Revolving Packet Multiple Loader. 



A high grade hunting repeating rifle, built to use full charges of smokeless rifle powder. 

6 M. M. Calibers, .236 I . S. Navy, Muzzle Velocity, 250O ft. 

7y 2 " '• .30 " Army. " " 2O00 ft. 

Reduced charges or black powder may be used. Also full mantle, half mantle with soft lead points, or all 
lead bullets. The only repeating sporting rifle that will shoot above standard cartridges. Send for free catalogue. 

JOHN HENRY BLAKE, - - - 136 Liberty Street, New York. 



AN 



ILLUMINATOR 



Not Simply a 
Signal. 



IT BURNS 

KEROSENE 



IT BURNS 

10 HOURS 



Bridgeport Brass Go 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
19 Murray Street, N. Y 




NOISES IN THE HEAD! 

(TINNITUS AURIUM). Distant thunder, hissing of 
steam, ringing, singing, roaring, chirping or rumbling 
sounds in ears (but NOT deafness) CURED ! Remedy 
sent postpaid on receipt of $1. Prescribed ONLY by Dr. 
CAMPBELL, 392 Park ave., BRIDGEPORT. Conn. 

ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY, June 21, 1895. 

I was distracted at times from a noise in my head ; your 
remedy has entirely removed the trouble, for which best 
thanks. 

WALTER VAN DUSEN, Bridgeport, Conn. 

80 BROADWAY, New York, July 3, 1895. 
Your Tinnitus remedy has cured the noises, but I feel 
like keeping on with the treatment, as something has cer- 
tainly made both my hearing and SIGHT more acute; 
kindly send two boxes to Blue Mountain Lake. N. Y. 

G. W. WEEKES. 

EAR DISCHARGES ! 

Resulting from SCARLET FEVER, MEASLES, AB- 
SCESS, GATHERINGS, &c, in children or adults, 
CURED at HOME, without pain or inconvenience. This 
remedy, price $2, sent with fulli nstructions. Address as 
above— Thirty years' experience in Aural Diseases. Let- 
ter consultations $1. 

Truth was stranger than fiction to Ananias. 

A side show attraction — A pretty profile. 

Monumental liars — A good many grave-stones. 

Repairs — Second marriages. 

In what month do women talk least ? In 
February. 

Many a man is expected to be the architect of 
his son-in-law's fortune. 



Blobbs — " Why do you call one of your rela- 
tives aunt and the other awnt ?" 

Slobbs — " Well, the other has money." 



To elevate the stage or not. 

That's the question ; so be it. 
Please elevate it ten feet high, 

So all the men can see it. 



The sample copy of your most excellent maga- 
zine received. It is exactly what I have been 
looking for. I suppose the best way to show my 
appreciation is to subscribe, and I therefore 
enclose my dollar. 

F. C. Angle. 



Enclosed I send you a dollar for Recreation 
which is away up to where the eagle is but a 
swallow in the zenith. 

Charles C. West. 



Enclosed find money order for one year's 
subscription. The time is not far distant when 
no sportsman or naturalist will be without 
Recreation. 

Prof. G. Stainsky, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Briggs. — It's a»great thing to be rich. Look 
at Bonder, for instance. He hires a young lady 
to read all the stories in the magazines for him, 
and when she gets a good one she lets him know. 
The only trouble is that he has to change girls so 
often. 

Griggs. — What becomes of the old ones ? 

Briggs. — They usually go insane. 

—N. Y. Herald. 



RECREA TION. 



XXV 



FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF. 




OUR HOUSE SAFES . . . 

Finished handsomely in cab- 
inet design. Are sold at mode- 
rate prices. They may be ordered 
in imitation of any wood to har- 
monize with furniture and 
fixtures. 

OUR BUSINESS SAFES . . . 

Fire and burglar-proof, meet 




Mosler Patent Improved every requirement 
Office Safe. 



Mosler Patent Improved 
House Safe. 



OSLER SAFE CO. 



305 Spoaduaay, Co^nep Daane Street, 



Telephone, 1086 Franklin. 



NEW YORK. 



The New England 
Kitchen Magazine. 

This handsome Domestic Science 
Monthly covers every department 
of the home life, brings the methods 
of the technical schools into the 
household, is progressive and 
authoritative. 



PUBLISHED AND EDITED BY 

MRS. MARY F. LINCOLN, 
MRS. ESTELLE M. H. MERRILL, 
and MISS ANNA BARROWS. 



The 

Triplex 

Improved 



44 9 



95," 



Just Out, is the 
Ideal Shutter. 



Agents Wanted in Every Town. 

Liberal Commissions. 
Send for a Free Sample Copy. 



7 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. 



Price, $1.00 per rear. 



It has time, slow-instantaneous and instan- 
taneous movements; instantaneous from 1-25 
to i-isoof a second, with speed-card, show- 
ing speed with the various springs. Used by 
nearly all prominent professionals and ama- 
teurs. Our new Catalogue, free, contains 
something of interest for you. Send for it. 

PROSCH MFG. CO. 

389 Broome Street, 
New York, N. Y. 



XXVI 



RECREA TION. 




fr 



BREVITY 15 THE SOULOF WIT 

Ride a " - 



V 



V 



THEY ARE 

UtJHT,STRON(q &SPEEDY. 

feuffalo Wheel Co. .Buffalo, N.Y. 




w 




Does not Affect the Eyes when Shooting in the Wind. 



THE LATEST AND ONLY PERFECT 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDER, 

HARD GRAIN. 

Not affected by Heat, Cold or Moisture. Very High Velocities. Low 
Pressures. Light Recoil and the most Beautiful Patterns. 

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR IT. 

Send for Engineer's Report containing tables showing relative values of all the nitro powders in 

the market. 

AMERICAN SMOKELESS POWDER CO. 

1 8 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 



RECREA TION 



XXVll 




Best Bicycle in the World.; 

LIGHT, GRACEFUL, STRONG, SPEEDY, BEAUTIFULLY FINISHED, 

EXQUISITELY DESIGNED, 




Four Models, $85 and $100. 

Elegant 40-page catalogue free at any agency orjmailed'for postage. 

MONARCH CYCLE MFG.*CO. 

Lake and Halsted Sts., F CHICAGO, ILL. 

EASTERN WAREHOUSE ; 79 Reade St. and 97 Chambers St., New York. 

The C. F. Gunyon Co., Ltd., Managers. 

BRANCH.ES: Boston, San Francisco, Portland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Memphis, l><troit. 



XXV111 



RECREA T10N. 



s 



Deer Park 



PEND THE SUMMER AT 



OR 



Oakland 




/ 



On the Crest of the Alleghanies. 
3,000 Feet Above Tide Water. 



-*-•-►- 



Season Opens June 22, 1895. 

These famous mountain resorts, situated at the summit of the Alleghanies, and directly 
upon the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, have the advantage of its 
spl endid vestibuled express train service both east and west, and are therefore readily 
accessible from all parts of the country. All Baltimore and Ohio trains stop at Deer Park 
and Oakland during the season. 

The houses and grounds are lighted by electricity. Turkish and Russian baths and 
large swimming pools are provided for ladies and gentlemen, and suitable grounds for 
lawn tennis ; there are bowling alleys and billiard rooms ; fine riding and driving horses, 
carriages, mountain wagons, tally-ho coaches, etc., are kept for hire ; in short, all the nec- 
essary adjuncts for the comfort, health or pleasure of patrons. 

Rates, $60, $75 and $90 a Month, According to Location. 

iiTiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiititiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^iitiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiif 



^\ LL communications should be addressed to 
L4 GEORGE D. DeSHIELDS, Manager Baltimore 
f * and Ohio Hotels, Cumberland, Md., up to June 
lOth ; after that date, Deer Park, Garrett County, Md. 



RECREATION. 



XXIX 



A Good Thing— 

—To Have Along! 

Shipley's New Fish Hook Holder. 




Will keep the gut and snell straight for 36 hooks 
or less. It is made of metal, handsomely japan- 
ned and striped, 9^ inches long by 4 wide, with 
cork inserted to hold the gut. A single hook can 
be inserted or removed in a moment, and hooks 
may be of any size and on single or double gut. 
Price by mail, 60 cts. 

Our Bethabara Rods 

Are the Only Genuine Bethabara. 

Some dealers at the recent Angler's Show in New 
York exhibited so-called Bethabara rods. They were not 
genuine. Send for a sample of the real Bethabara and 
compare it. Other dealers cannot procure this wood. 

These rods (by us) are made in all useful sizes and 
shapes. We also have Bamboo, Double-Enamel Split 
Bamboo, Lancewood and all other good Rods, Tackle 
and accessories. Send five z-cent stamps for Catalogue. 

A. B. SHIPLEY & SON, 

503 Commerce Street, Philadelphia. 



Success XssuTed 



WHEN USING 

Carbutt's .-. Dry.-. Plates 

and Celluloid Films=Cut Sizes. 

Used the world over, and tested in every clime. 

ECLIPSE 27 For Portrai ts and 

——————— ^_ Shutter Exposures. 

ORTHO 23 to 27 F ° r A i^ tic 

— _ . .__ _ ^ __ an d Scien- 
tific Work. 

B SEN 16 For Time Exposures and 
Copying. And the BEST 
Plate for Beginners. 

J, C. TABLOIDS. 

A powerful developer, specially intended for In- 
stantaneous Exposures, produces good negatives with 
only half the ordinary exposure, equally good for 
time exposures, and developing Lantern Slides. 

Price, 75 cents per box, post free. Contains enough 
to develop 6 to 12 dozen 4x5 Plates or Films. 

SIMPLE, CLEAN AND HANDY. 

For sale by all Merchants in Photographic Materials. 

JOHN CARBUTT, 

KEYSTONE DRY Wayne Junction, 
PLATE AND FILM WORKS. Philadelphia. 

Send for New Catalogue and Reduced Price List. 



♦♦♦ 't , 'f*'t*#'t*'t* f |"f M f"f"t» •HMhH* 



I HUNT AND FISH 

* ON THE 

f N 



T 

* 

ft 

* 

pI 

A|. 

^* 

Some f^aire Opportunities. 




*$» Four Cents will bring you our new 
+. Game Book. 

T Six Cents will bring our handsome 
W new Tourist Book. 

$ CHAS. S. FEE, Gen. Pass. Agent, 
& St. Paul, Minn. 



TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

Two yearly subscriptions to RECREATION at 
$1 each, I will give a copy of " Hunting in 
the Great West;" paper. 

Three subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of " The 
Battle of the Big Hole;" cloth. 

Four subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of " Camp- 
ing and Camp Outfits;" cloth. 

Five subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of " Cruis- 
ings in the Cascades;" cloth. 

Six subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of "American 
Game Fishes;" cloth. 

Seven subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of " The 
Big Game of North America," or of "The 
American Book of the Dog;" cloth. 

Ten subscriptions at $1 each, a single shot Rifle 
worth $10, or a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod 
worth $10. 

Fifteen subscriptions at $1 each, a single barrel 

breech loading Shot Gun worth $15. 
Twenty-five subscriptions at $1 each, a double 

barrel breech loading Shot Gun worth $25. 
Thirty-five subscriptions at $1 each, a double barrel 

hammerless breech loading Shot Gun worth >35. 
Seventy-five subscriptions at $1 each, a Safety 

Bicycle worth $75. 

These Guns and Bicycles are new, and will be 
shipped direct from factory. Prices named are those 
at which manufacturers sell. Here is a good chance 
to get a book, a gun or a bicycle free of cost. These 
off ers relate only to subscriptions to be sent in here- 
after, and not to such as may already have been sent. 



RECREATION, 216 William St., New York. 



XXX 



RECREA TION. 




THE SANDOW BICYCLE LOCK, 

'.STRONG, SMALL AND SECURE. 

Attachable to the Chain and Sprocket Wheel. 

50 CENTS. 

THIEF PROOF. EASILY ADJUSTED. 

The Sandow is the only bicycle lock which fills a long felt want 
among Bicycle riders, because it is thief proof and can be carried 
in the tool bag or vest pocket, with key attachable to key chain. 

A mystery to unlock until shown how. Cannot be picked open 
or cut. 

SOLD BY ALL BICYCLE DEALERS, 

or sent to any address on receipt of 50 cents. Send for complete 
catalogue of Cyclometers, Star Lamp Brackets, etc. 

The Bridgeport Grim Implement Co. 

313 & 315 Broadway, New York. 



Sp ortsmen, Look He re ! 

RIFLE AND REVOLVER CARTRIDGES 
LOADED WITH SMOKELESS POWDER. 



22 Short R. F. 



32 S. & W.C. F. 



NOW READY. 



Other Calibres 

in Preparation. 




|'> SMOKELESS 




NOW READY. 



38 S. & W. C. F. 



25-20; |Marlin C. F. 



Other Calibres 

in Preparation. 



Compared with cartridges loaded with Black powder 

U. Ml. C. SMOKELESS CARTRIDGES 

are equal in accuracy and have many advantages, including the following : 

INCREASED VELOCITY, GREATER EXECUTION, SMOKELESS, NO 

LEADING OF BARRELS, LESS RECOIL, LESS NOISE. 



jL. 



Now ready in limited quantities. Branded " Nitro," maroon color, using new No. 5 Primer. TT A 
perfect shell for nitro powders, and positively does not require priming with black powder. Same 
price as other low-priced shells. 

Send for Catalogue. 

THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

BBIDGJEJPOBT, COJVJV. 



RECREA TION. 



Aeeurate Shooting 

CAN ONLY BE DONE WITH A PERFECT GUN. 




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ME III. 
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RECREATION. 



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RECREATION. 

Copyright, May, 1895, by G. O. Shields. 
A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything that the Name Implies. 



;i.oo A Year, 

10 Cents A Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA). 
Editor and Manager. 



17,6 West 24111 S 1 ree i . 

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CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER. 

Belle Was Waltzing to the Music of the Gavotte FRONTISI 

Billy Boy and Belle. Illustrated Katherine M. Baxter. 

A Bald Faced Grizzly in Camp. Illustrated M. W. Mi nek. 

Crossing the Rockies in '61. Illustrated Major W. H. Schieefeein. 

A Close Call for General Sherman Lieut. J. H. Sands, U. S. A. 

Where Leaps the Ouananiche. (Poem) Dr. E. L. Tiffany. 

Lost in the Cheat Mountains W. L. Washington. 

Fly Fishing Dr. M. G. Eelzev. 

A Half Hour With the Quail Dr. E. P. Kremer (Juvenis). 

Guatemotzin, a Tale of the Aztecs Dr. J. E. Tucker. 

The Genesis of the Metallic Cartridges. Illustrated. Capt. Philip Reade.L.S.A. 

From the Game Fields 

Editor's Corner 145 |' Fish and Fishing 

Possible Smiles 146 I Amateur Photography 

Bicycling 147 | Publisher's Department 

Entered as Second Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17th, 1894. 



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11 



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BELLE 



WAS WALTZING TO THE MUSIC OF THE GAVOTTE. 



Volume III. 



RECREATION. 

SEPTEMBER, J895. 

G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 3. 



Ihe American News Co., Agents for the U. S. and Canada. The International News Co General 
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BILLY-BOY AND BELLE. 

A DISCORD AND A HARMONY. 

Katharine M. Baxter. 




HE has 
lovely 
bro w n 
eyes, and his 
auburn hair, in 
the sunglints, 
looks like bur- 
nished copper. 
He has a stur- 
dy, compact 
frame, is calm- 
ly deliberate, 
and carries 
himself right 
royally with 
his head in the 
clouds. But in 
spite of the 
docility expressed in his soft eye, 
he is headstrong and likes to pit his 
will-power against mine; conse- 
quently, there is an unending contest 
for mastery between Billy-boy and 
me. 

My saddle-horse is of Morgan 
stock, Kentucky -bred, has all the 
gaits, can take a low fence or ditch, 
and, best of all, possesses unlimited 
physical endurance. His gaits are so 
easy that a fox-trot on the pavement 
or a canter on a country dirt road are 
joys forever, after I have conquered 
him for the day, for he sometimes 
starts out with the fixed purpose of 
returning at the least excuse. On 
such occasions I let him turn back, 
but start him again, repeating it 
forth and back until he is ready to 
advance. This I refuse to allow, and 
after punishing him with a few more 
such rehearsals he is completely 



subjected and ready to do my bid- 
ding. Of course this is only when 
riding unattended in the country. 

One morning while summering at 

N I started out for one of these 

country rides. The place was new 
to us and Billy-boy decided for both 
that we would not investigate its 
roads that day. I disliked to have 
the villagers make his acquaintance 
by putting him through his paces for 
the usual length of time, and lor me 
to yield would be foil}'. 1 quite lost 
my patience with this firm friend. 
My riding whip ? He has 1 1 * > more 
respect for it than for a troublesome 
fly. His former owner had ridden 
him with spurs, as does also my hus- 
band. It was therefore that C. had 
had a small wheel-spur inserted in 
the end of my crop-stick. Even this 
was inadequate. 1 could merely roll 
it up and down his side without force 
or impression. Chagrined, but not 
baffled, I dismounted, and hurrying 
indoors soon had one of my husban< 's 
spurs adjusted on my stirrup-toot. 

A young friend, coming out t<> 
mount his wheel, suggested ' Mr-. 
B., perhaps he'll follow me." 

" Yes," 1 nodded, " I'm sure he will, 
else my spur will follow him." 

Philip T— , Jr., riding ahead, fre- 
quently called, " Come on, Hilly-boy," 
and Billy-boy went; the spur was su- 
perfluous. 

The pretty village gardens were 
soon left behind besprinkled with 
our dust. The day was not a perfect 
one; the atmosphere, hazy and sti- 
fling, suggested northern foresl fires. 



103 



104 



RECREATION. 



A film bedimming the sun produced 
an opalescent effect — " resembled 
more a poached egg," observed Phil. 
A slight wind blew heated dust in our 
eyes, and everything took on a fiery 
tinge. 

The hawthorn's crimson crop had 
been scattered — thinned out by na- 
ture, to allow tjie rest to fully ripen. 
The sumach's torches were not alone 
aflame; the leaves, too, had apparently 
caught and were all ablaze, keeping 
company with September's late car- 
dinal flower. Even Billy-boy's mane 
(he is called a strawberry-roan) re- 
flected a glare. All this brilliancy 
would have been charmingly effective 
on a cool, clear day; but under these 
circumstances it produced the effect 
of the muleta or the banderilla in the 
arena — it tantalized. 

We gladly rested our steeds at the 
first hint of shade, a group of hick- 
ory trees in a fence corner, and voting 
our ride a failure, resolved to return] 
My horse, unable to extract any 
moisture from the parched, dusty 
grass, tried the lower leaves, and 
Phil., Jr., vaulted the barbed- wire 
fence for goldenrod with which to 
decorate my saddle. 

44 Now take it at college." said he, 
"toward the close of the semester 
when exams, are over, we fellows" 

" Listen, Phil ! " I interrupted, " can 
that be thunder ? " But no, it was too 
continuous. Riding to the highest 
point of observation, I saw, turning 
into our lane at the hill-foot, a steam 
threshing machine. Billy-boy first 
catching sound and sight of it as- 
sumed an attitude of eager attention. 
Answering Phil's interrogation, I 
said, no, he had never seen one be- 
fore, and although at home I had 
soothed him into passing acquaint- 
ance with steam-rollers, electric mo- 
tors and other peace-disturbers, I dis- 
liked such an encounter on this down- 
hill road, hemmed in by barbed wire. 

" For the love of Heaven ! Mrs. 
B., what's to be done ? Will you 
dismount ? Shall I hold him ? He'll 
never pass that howling machine." 

44 No, nor will he let you hold him. 
We must go on, instead of back : you 



kindly go down with your wheel ; ask 
them to check it long enough to give 
us a start, and we'll turn out at the 
first crossroad. I suppose you know 
some other route home ?" 

" Yes, yes — why certainly," and 
we separated. The noise ceased, 
Phil, overtook us, and we were again 
uncomfortably speeding, Billy-boy 
tossing his head and snorting a de- 
cided 4< I told you so." On and on 
we rode, farther from home, high 
noon and the 44 howling machine " on 
our track. 

44 How many miles yet, Phil., be- 
fore we come to a crossroad ?" 

44 To be truthful, I've not been out 
this way since I was a mere kid, but 
we'll surely come to one presently 
leading to a short cut home : now 
don't allow yourself to become at all 
nervous, Mrs. B., I'll see that noth- 
ing occurs," and leaning manfully 
forward for a spurt ahead — some- 
thing occurred. The exclamation 
that followed, as he extricated from 
between the spokes some projecting 
vine-roots, was quite untranslatable, 
but coming from a college-bred youth, 
I felt it could be nothing unfit for ears 
polite. Coming soon after to a piece 
of second-growth timber, scrub-oak 
and underbrush, Phil, beamed. 

44 Ah ! I knew I could not have 
mistaken the locality ; here is the 
coveted road, Mrs. B., right through 
the wood." Yes, here was a road 
into which we dashed. The voice of 
our tormentor grew fainter. I slack- 
ened our speed. Billy-boy was grate- 
ful, and Phil, resumed his college 
yarn." 

44 Yes, it is extremely difficult for 
one of those intellectual freaks, called 
by courtesy a Tute, to reconcile — " 

44 Whoa ! Pardon me, Phil., but 
look up." I pointed to a board sign 
nailed to a tree, bearing in blue paint 
this inscription — RoAd, bLokEd. 

44 Blocked ! — Great Zeus deliver us! 
I dare say, Mrs. B. — O, never mind, 
we'll go as far as we may and wait 
for our following Nemesis to pass 
the wood. It's a long lane, etc., you 
know." 

But it wasn't long before we came 



BILL Y-BO Y AND BELLI: . , 5 

to the end of this, a blind road, foot?" -which 1 accepted as quite 

blocked by a farm-house, flanked on ungallant from a Q. B. on last year's 

the right by a field of oat-stubble, on team. Old Jerry needed but a glance, 

the left by a government swamp of and soon had me in position on my 

tamarack. We waited in this horri- mount, observing, as he arrange d my 

ble wood where the army-worm was skirt : 

at work. The branches, bared of " Indade, ma'am, whin ()i was wid 

leaves, were clothed instead with the gintry in the ould country, it's 

these loathesome caterpillars which many a foine miss Oi put into the 

fairly rained down upon us sounding saddle; and sich illegant bastes to 

like great plashing drops in a sum- ride!" 

mer shower. Furthermore, we were I faced the machine ; Billy-boy 

entertained by a blue-jay, whose throwing back his ears snorted his 

stridulous notes seemed to come disapproval and began to back. Coax- 

from a metallic throat with a crack ing was entirely ineffectual. 

in it. Again the voice of the ma- Phil, was really alarmed. " Mrs. 

chine became audible. We guessed B., I beg of you don't ride him; let 

it was just passing; then we com- the man handle him." But I pre- 

mented on the fact that the wood so ferred to handle my high horse; and 

long retained the sound. Billy-boy taking a firm grip of snaffle and curb 

was uneasy. A man coming from reins, simultaneously gave him a 

the house, let down the bars, and sa- smarting cut from the right and dug 

luted us. W 7 e explained our presence, my heel into him from the left. He 

and this is what we heard : sprang, cleared the low bars into the 

" Sorry it is, me leddy, that Oi am wood lane, and — we were off. 
to inform yees that Kent's trashin- Through the wood, the low brandies 
michane intinds to coom this same tearing off my veil; through ant-hills 
day to trash thim oats; and me wo- and flying sticks, out to the man) 
man's that fightin-mad, bein's the road and down the hill, on we gal- 
roast pork's waitin' this while for loped without cessation. Now I 
their dinners. Sure it's after yees." must admit that, despite loss of 

The machine was in sight. Fancy breath, and strain of nerves, to keep 
our being chased right up and a firm rein, I enjoyed the exhilaration 
brought to bay, with but one road of this wild ride; was even tempted 
and that occupied ! We made straight to give him his head and see to what 
for the barn, where I dismounted until speed he could attain — and oh, if I 
the thing could locate itself and be- only dared complete this gypsy - 
come quiet. Of course the time came dream by throwing away my burden- 
when I must pass it, but, fortunately, some hat, and letting the breeze take 
I had plenty of room. To Phil., who my hair. Then again, at the last 
wished to lead him, I suggested — turn, where instead of following the 
"If you'll kindly assist me to curve, he swept sharply across the 
mount." He quickly responded, corner and cleared a ditch, I won- 
then hesitated, looking blankly at me. dered if this could be anything like 

"Tell me the rules, Mrs. B., I'm riding to hounds, 

ashamed to say I don't know exactly!' My good imagination always sen es 

" By me loife, yoong man," inter- when the real purpose is not at 

posed old Jerry, " thin it's rale pleas- hand; but alas ! with my thought 

ure Oi'll take in givin' yees insthruc- and the horse's leap had come another 

tions. Clasp the ball of her fut, the uprising — a young porker, from the 

lift wan, betwixt yer two hands, and leaves in the ditch, whence it had 

whin she says wan, two, three — been disturbed from its siesta. I his 

riddy ! jist hoist her roight up-loike, brought my horse from a hill gallop 

but a-i-s-y an' graceful-loike." to an almost complete stop, nearly 

Phil, looked doubtful. "I'm famil- unseating me. 1 came down into the 

iar with foot-ball, but— the ball of the saddle quite hard and suddenly, just 



io6 RECREATION. 

as he made a plunge with his head any communication of annoyance 

low down and began to fairly plow from Billy-boy or me. A dreadful 

along. Instantly I drew in the curb- day ! and how susceptible to irrita- 

rein, against which tearing bit he tion I had shown myself; but remem- 

could not proceed, and tried to soothe ber the causes — caterpillars, gnats 

and reassure him as he reared and and " sich." 

tossed his head in the most maddened They say there are no discords in 

way. I released the curb, but still nature. I do not agree. I think 

the poor animal continued pawing there are many jars, and purposely 

and shaking his head in a perfect provided, as in music occasionally, 

frenzy. in order that we may the more enjoy 

I soon found the cause. Of a cloud and appreciate the delightful harmo- 

of gnats buzzing about his head, evi- nies that follow. 

dently one had gotten into his ear; This day had certainly been, in 

but his head was too active for me to nature (human and otherwise), a dis- 

remove it with the handle of my cord. 

crop-stick. I could only hope to out- ' - * * * 
ride them. A visit to a State brigade encamp- 
Ahead, there was a clear stretch ment means to a woman many things, 
of about a mile, and Billy-boy divin- Beginning with a flutter of expecta- 
ing dinner at the end of it, again went tion, there follows a thrill of inspira- 
to work. tion, due to uniforms and martial 
" Yes, Billy-boy, we're going home, music, often ending in a sense of des- 
no more to roam; our picnic's almost peration at our apparent insignifi- 
over — oh!" Something dropped— cance beside these lords of creation 
my foot. Glancing over the right I who are, after all, only playing sol- 
saw the stirrup-strap that had encir- dier. The Infantry was largely 

cled his body dragging, the stirrup represented at the annual encamp- 
probably in a fence-corner rods be- ment in the summer of which I write, 
hind. With this loss I had no means and a few of the officers' wives were 
of bracing myself for another emerg- pleasantly located at a farm-house 
ency, and could scarcely prevent my within sound of the bugle-calls at 
dangling foot from spurring him. Camp W. 

Gradually, without adding to his All the delights of the country 
alarm, T gathered up and coiled the were attainable at this charming re- 
long strap, tucking it into the pocket treat, the adjacent lake furnishing 
of my saddle-flap. not the least of the attractions. A 
In the best running speed he has sail-boat with home-made rigging 
ever made, he reached the hotel ve- had a companion in a side-wheeler, 
randah, panting and dripping, the also of home manufacture, a small 
saddle-cloth disarranged, broken boat propelled by turning the cranks 
strap and lost stirrup. I, with hair of the wheels instead of the regula- 
disheveled and hat awry, had not re- tion use of oars and rudder. There 
alized the terrible strain on fingers, were islets, a lily-pond, a beaver-dam, 
wrists and arms until giving up the bathing beach and good fishing facili- 
reins, the four of which between the ties; but chief among the pleasures 
fingers of my riding- gloves had for me was Farmer A.'s cream-col - 
caused the beveled-edged band on ored mare, used by the family for 
my third finger to cut deep into the Sunday driving, but said to possess 
flesh. all the qualities of a good saddle- 

And Phil.? He " fetched up," as a horse, 

native said, a full hour afterward, As my riding outfit always forms 

with the rubber tire of his wheel a part of my luggage to the country, 

punctured by a sharp flint. Always I was enabled to make a trial trip, 

good natured, he had to the last and was so charmed with this added 

proven himself invulnerable to means of pleasure, that Belle became 



BILLY- BOY AND BELLE. 



i ' 



my companion for an hour or more 
each morning. Many are the nooks, 
knolls, woods and pasture-hills 1 be- 
came acquainted with through her 
chaperonage. A well-known writer 
has truly said : 

" Almost everything in life depends 
on our point of view, * * * the 
wor.d is instantly changed when one 
mounts a horse * * * and the 
most familiar by-ways are created 
anew for him." 

This partly explains the elation of 
riding, to which can be added the 
fact that a vast amount of animation 
and vitality is communicated from 
animal to rider. Cycling is good; 
sailing with a stiff beam wind, and a 
yacht, heeling well over, is better; 
but for a mixture of health and hap- 
piness supreme, give me a good 
mount in the country. 1 fancy it must 
be next in order after flying, as I al- 
ways feel a bit nearer heaven in my 
Whitman, than when walking or driv- 
ing in the regular beaten paths. 

C , who as adjutant of the 

Infantry was using Billy-boy at camp 
and confining himself strictly to duty 
during the day, had arranged for a 
twilight trip around the lake. On a 
certain day I was to ride over to camp 
W. in time to witness evening parade 
and wait for him to join me after 
guard-mounting, the day's last as 
well as first ceremony — for at this 
camp, Gen. R. in command of the 
brigade, fur purposes of better in- 
struction in sentinel duty, had re- 
duced the "tour" from twenty-four 
to twelve hours, thus necessitating 
evening as well as morning guard- 
mounting. 

Belle was in excellent condition 
for a good time; so was her rider; 
and now, too, as I rode forth, I real- 
ized " there are others," fur appar- 
ently all of nature's summer boarders 
were out exchanging pleasantries. I 
distinguished among these a com- 
plete quartette — nature's troubadors. 
The meadow-lark's three plaintive so- 
prano notes, were seconded by a fair 
contralto in the night-hawk's swoop. 
At intervals, from a thick clump of 
elder-bushes, came the robin's tender 



tenor; and what more effective for bas- 
so-profundo than the bull-frog's inter- 
mittent lower G. Presently these were 
accompanied by the Katydid's inces 
sant drumming — quite castanet-like. 
They had begun early to-day. Sun 
set had not yet closed the clover's 
trefoils, for during this loitering gait 
1 espied, amidst a large clump oi 
these leaves, a monstrous iour-lea\ ed 
Good-luck, with the horse-shoe in 
distinct silver markings on each leaf. 
Naturally, it being out of reach. 1 de- 
sired it, the more so the farther be- 
hind I left it, until meeting sometime 
after Farmer A.'s cows returning 
from pasture, I retraced the entire 
distance that the boy might gather it 
for me. Its unusual size and bright 
green were effective against the dark 
green of my habit. Now I felt quite 
ready for camp. Music being audi- 
ble long before sighting the white 
village, i concluded that parade was 
" on," and I would miss it; at brigade- 
headquarters, too, the pity of it ! Su 
much for following an impulse and a 
clover-leaf. 

"Boom!" sounded the sunset gun 
with the last notes of " retreat," and 
simultaneously from the flag-staff at 
general headquarters dropped " Old 
Glory." Evidently the troops were 
now leturning to quarters. Entei ing 
the grounds, I made for the head- 
quarters of " Ours," where the guard 
was lined up in front of the tents, 
and my adjutant was conducting 
guard mount. Wishing to be an un- 
observed observer, I changed my 
course to the alley, or spate in rear 
of the tents. Our band, stationed to 
the ri<rht of the line and facing in my 
direction, was waiting for the com- 
mand — "Sound Off." 

The director, Prof. S . spoke t<- his 
men and when the order was given 
they began playing tin- gavotte by 
Slavin, "Little Irish Queen." Ik-w 
lovely! I recognized the compli- 
ment. At a previous camp he had 
played it at my request, and, in tact. 
it was a general favorite for mount- 
ing guard, with its stirring melody 
and marked precision of time. 

But, whatever was the matter with 



1 08 



RECREATION 




BUT ALAS ! WITH MY THOUGHT AND THE HORSE'S LEAP CAME ANOTHER UPRISING. 



Belle ! She had never been unman- 
ageable before. Up she reared, then 
down, and whirling wildly round and 
round, just escaped tripping over the 
tent guy-ropes. I righted her, but 
immediately she began repeating this 
strange performance. The third time 
she stepped gaily out, omitting to 
pose as an upright; took two gentle 
lopes, again whirled, but in perfect 
time to the music. Then two more 
lopes and a whirl and, — mercy me ! I 
understood. Belle was waltzing to 
the gavotte ! Yes, surely, and with 
never a mistake. After every two-step 
came a whirl. My memory recalled 



a similar vision at a riding-school ex- 
hibition. Seeing is believing. Alas! 
in my case it was feeling is believing, 
for I no sooner recovered from one 
dizzy spell than it was time for 
another. Now we had reached the 
colonel's tent, and oh ! those deadly 
guy-ropes. Vainly I shouted to the 
orderly in front; my voice was no 
match for those brass instruments. 
Belle having found her terpsichorean 
dimensions, was blissfully regardless 
of my commands; waltz she would 
and did, the entire length of the line 
(in the rear) and back again, seem- 
ingly under control of but one thing 



BILLY- BOY AND BELLE. 109 

— the music. Imagining myself in but once — that was the entire stretch, 
her place 'twas not hard to realize At one point on our return, bringing 
how her toes (?) must tingle at the our horses to a halt on the lake's 
staccato passages and marked rhythm brink, we listened, just to note the 
of that music. When it ceased, she stillness. For several moments no 
stopped as suddenly, shook herself, sound was audible; not a leaf whis- 
neighed a long " ha-ha" of satisfac- pered, not a ripple sighed. Suddenly, 
tion, and panted her weariness, for piercing the complete silence, came, 
all the world like a girl at her first clear and bell-like, the notes of a sin- 
party who, having danced up to the gle trumpet — "taps," that most el- 
last note, shakes her draperies into fective strain of two dozen notes, 
proper arrangement, sinks into a seat As the last vibration died away, there 
and between gasps and twitters, in- followed, in succession, others, in 
vites her partner to fan her. I had different keys — five in all. From the 
hoped that the company had been left to the extreme right of the field, 
too attentive to its duty to have per- close by and far in the distance, 
ceived us, but Belle, again like the faintly, like echoes of the first, came 
pretty girl, was showered with com- the answering goodnight call, "taps" 
pliments on her graceful steps. The — "lights out;" and once more all 
officers, not satisfied with feeding was silent. Slowly and regretfully 
her lump-sugar, took the liberty of we moved; it was time for us, too, to 
caressing her neck and patting her say " good night." At my stopping 
pretty pink nose. place, Farmer A. came out to meet 
Major R. even fell into poetry, and us, and C. related Belle's little es- 
while the orderly was dispatched for capade. 

a pail of water with which to quench "Why, gosh all hemlock, Cap'n," 

her thirst, he quoted from Sir John with a grave salute, " Say, ef I'd a 

Sauckling : — knowed that, the madam could a hed 

" Her feet * * * * my best black Pedro. He's just hun- 

Like little mice stole in and out, ky-dory, ef he aint got no gaits — an' 

As if they feared the light: he kin trot "Say!" (confidentially) 

But oh, she dances such a wav ! ^.i • 1 1 / 

No sun upon an Easter-day ' thls here mare was oncet owned by 

Is half so fine a sight." a circus feller, but by ginger ! 1 never, 

Perhaps all this had a revivifying ef- knowed her to go a sky-larkin round 

feet, for she was quite ready to fill lik that." 

her next engagement. Ah! that was it; how expressive ! 

****** " a skylark at twilight." Atall events, 

We started out in the gray twilight, the experience had been delightfully 

C. and I, on Billy-boy and Belle, and unique. I regretted nothing: com- 

rode far into the creamy moonlight, paring this episode with that of one 

taking the six miles around the lake other day, I shall long preserve it in 

at an easy gait, and drinking delight my memory as — a harmony. 

Love hath its drawbacks, we are told, 

And I have found it true; 
I scarce know if I'll sit or stand 

When next I call on Sue. 

'Twas not from her I met rebuff, 

She favored well the suit, 
'Twas in the way her father threw 

His No. eleven boot. 

I'd prosecute him even now 

Or biff him in the jaw, 
But just before I'm married 

I don't want a father in law. 

Capt. Jack.Crawford. 




j^^r^fjv 



HE RAN AROUND THE TREE SEVERAL TIMES AND CUPKBD SOME OF 

THEY WERE IN THE FIGHT TOO. 



THE LOWER LIMBS AS IF 



A BALD-FACED GRIZZLY IN CAMP. 

M. W. Miner. 

I had a circus here in Cripple Sheep for the cause of the stampede. About 

Gulch, Ore., last evening, and I know 60 or 70 yards down the gulch, in a 

you would have appreciated it had boggy, grassy place next the creek, 

you been here. Talk about Charity was a bald-faced grizzly leisurely 

Balls! They weren't in it for real picking the fresh, tender shoots of 

high lonesome! grass. 

I was tired of being in town, and The wind was full in my favor and 

these nice, warm days gave me the he had not noticed the cam p. It 

" hill fever." As 1 had no particular took me about two seconds to decide 

business for a few weeks I decided to to go in and nail him, as there are 

go out to see this country, near the lots of small, bushy pines here that 

head of Burnt river. (It was touched are convenient to climb, and 1 knew 

off some time ago.) I loaded my he couldn't hurt me. 1 emptied a 

camp outfit and a pick and shovel on box of cartridges in my trousers 

to my little burro, Trilby (I gave pocket, grabbed my little Stevens 

J^er that name because she has the and sallied forth, not forgetting to 

-^rue Trilby footsie-tootsies and sings retain several cartridges in my left 

Ben Bolt with an emphatic accent hand. By making a circuit, to keep 

on the final syllable) and last Wed- the bear behind a little willow bush, 

nesday we hit the trail. Two days' I reached a small pine about 25 

travel brought us here, to a nice little yards distant and at once let <m> at 

park among the pines and willows, him for a paunch shot, which I knew 

in a deep gulch. Giving Trilby a would kill him eventually, 
leather necklace with a bell on, and He whirled at the shot and I gave 

a handful of salt in a rotten stump, I him another at the butt of his ear. 

made camp and ever since have been That went high and cut a gash 

roaming over the hills, in search of across his scalp. At the second shot 

quartz, opals, placer ground or any- he caught sight of me and at onee 

thing else that would be useful. started on the jump, to have a hand 

I was too lazy to carry my Winches- in the scrap himself. I knew if we 

ter and did not think I should need it were to shake hands, the proper and 

any way, so took my little 25-calibre polite way would be to give him the 

Stevens pocket rifle. I had not had a " high shake;" so 1 went up some 10 

shot except at a hawk that had the au- or 12 feet into the pine, without any 

dacity to perch in a dead tree near ceremony. 

camp. Yesterday I had been out all In crossing the little ravine, washed 

day and on my return atea five o'clock out by the creek, I think he lost 

dinner, sharing the dry crusts with sight of me, and the outer branches 

Trilby, who had come into camp, were so thick 1 could not see to 

and then proceeded to bake a loaf shoot. As the bear landed on my 

of bread in the frying-pan before the side he hesitated a moment and then 

fire. On account of the high wind catching sight of the tent he went for 

I had plenty to do to prevent the it on a gallop. I fired at him but 

loaf from burning up before it was without apparent effect. Just in trout 

baked. I was congratulating my- of the tent sat my camp bucket, and 

self that it was about done, when with one swipe of his paw he sent it 

all of a sudden Trilby started off rolling into the creek. Next came 

up the gulch, singing Ben Bolt at a sack of Hour. One wipe with 

every jump. I could not understand his paw split it wide open and 

her unusual activity, and after glanc- sent it rolling it over the bed 

ing at her a moment I looked around and the rest of the outfit. My red 




"THERE WAS A WHIRLING APPARITION OF CANVAS, TINWARE, GROCERIES, BLANKETS, 

BOOTS AND PACK SADDLES." 



A BALD-FACED GRIZZLY IN CAMP. 



"3 



blankets next attracted his attention. 
He gave them a whirl, a bite and a 
shake that left them a sorry spectacle 
for a cold night. He next tore the 
crown out of my hat. In turning 
around he knocked down the center 
pole of the tent, and for about two 
seconds there was the most laughable 
sight a man ever saw. The pegs 
flew out at once. There was a whirl- 
ing apparition of canvas, tinware, 
groceries, blankets, boots and pack 
saddles. 

When the bear emerged (if I may 
use that word, for he seemed to 
come through the tent in a dozen 
places at once) he was bewildered. 
I gave him another shot in the 
side of his head that recalled him 
to his work and drew his attention 
to my retreat. He came on a run and 
caught another bullet between his 
shoulders. He ran around the tree 
several times and cuffed some of the 
lower limbs, as if they were in the fight 
too. I fired several shots into him, 
all without any apparent effect. At 
last he sat down a second time, as if to 
sum up the situation, and I tried for 
an eye shot; but as I pressed the 
trigger he threw up his head and got 
it in the nose, which seemed to set 
him crazy. He rolled over back- 
ward, pawed it with both feet and 
squealed. In that position he gave 
me a good shot at his chest, and I 
sent a little 25 in there, ranging for- 
ward. This seemed to revive him. 
He got up, ran a few steps, tottered 
and fell. He was unable to rise. I 
jolted him up with two more shots at 
the base of his brain and he seemed 
quiet; but it was some time before I 
risked a return to earth. Before 
doing so I took a shot at one of his 



paws, and got no response. After 
throwing a few clubs at him I ven- 
tured near and held a post-mortem 
examination. 

I went to camp and surveyed the 
ruins. It looked as if a Kansas cy- 
clone had blown a slaughter-house 
through the camp. Flour nearly all 
gone; camp bucket down the creek; 
tent, blankets and hat torn to rib- 
bons. I've spent this whole day 
sewing them together, so I could 
live under them again. 

I found that 17 of the 18 shots 
had landed, the one in the chest 
having been fatal, as it ranged for- 
ward and entirely through the heart. 
One of the last two shots had entered 
the brain. 

Trilby ventured back in sight this 
morning, but thus far I have been 
unable to coax her near camp. I had 
$70 worth of fun and have a four 
dollar bear hide, which is thin and 
patchy. I know you would willingly 
get another sack of flour to have 
been with me. 

There is an old owl up in one ot 
these big pines, hooting at me, but 
it's too dark for a shot at him. There 
are two coyotes over on the open 
hill side, warbling their vesper songs, 
or practicing for their Easter festival. 
There's a low wind moaning through 
the pines and a lone prospector with 
a large and aching void in his camp 
outfit which a cold and uncharitable 
world is not likely to fill —this season. 
But, as I remarked, I've had some 
fun and I'm still on deck. I'd like 
to borrow an old hat until I can get 
to town. I'd like to send you a bear 
ham. It's too lean for me, but editors 
are not supposed to live on the fat 
of the land. 



He loaded his boat with all kinds of tackle 
And about what he'd catch he proceeded 
to cackle. 
The fish in the bay were not hungry that day; 
The gnats and the flies had a feast, by the 
way, 
Yet of sport he constantly preached. 

H. M. Brown. 




114 



CROSSING THE ROCKIES IN '61. 

Maj. W. H. Schieffelin. 

Continued from page 56. 

I HAD made a great mistake in hopes. Fortunately I had no buck 
the selection of a rifle at the ague. Probably I was too hungry to 
start, for instead of buying a have it. I selected the best animal 
breech loader, then just coming into in the bunch, aimed behind his 
use, I had selected a fine muzzle shoulder, and fired. The old shaky 
loader, of the old Leather-stocking musket did its work well. Down 
type. In loading it I had to start the went the antelope; then he jumped 
ball with a short ramrod, and then up and ran, but not in the same di- 
force it down with a long one, which rection the others had taken. I fol- 
took so much time and exertion, lowed him about a quarter of a mile, 
that I seldom fired the gun, and so when I found him dead. 1 cut his 
was not as good a shot as I no doubt throat, and cleaned him. The ball 
would have been, at the end of the had gone true and smashed his should- 
journey, had I taken a breech loader, er. I put his hind legs over my 
About two weeks after leaving Fort shoulder and started for the camp. 
Benton, we ran out of fresh meat. The boys had seen the hunt and 
We found no game for several days its successful termination, so they 
and so were in hard luck. I borrowed soon met me with a horse, relieved 
the Half-breed's gun, an old musket me of my load, and we had a feast, 
which was patched with tin and tied It was fortunate for us that the ante- 
together with copper wire. Lock, lope were of a curious and inquiring 
stock and barrel all seemed to be nature, 
loose. One lovely Sunday morning, * * * 
we saw a bunch of antelope about How we did enjoy this wild life ! 
three miles away, so we determined We had perfect health, good appe- 
to remain in camp and I set off to tites, unbroken rest at night, wrapped 
try for one. I got up to within 500 in our blankets and buffalo robes, 
yards of them, but could get no near- with our saddles for our pillows, and 
er, as there was no more shelter, so I the stars for our canopy. We did not 
lay down in the grass, took the ram- however, enjoy so much, the cry of 
rod out of the old rifle, put my red the half-breed cook, just before day- 
handkerchief on the end of it, and break: " Leve " (wake up). When 
stuck it in the ground. I had read this unwelcome summons came we 
and heard about the influence of a red had to turn out, whether ready or no, 
rag on these animals but did not half and sometimes to break the ice in 
believe it. However, I had supplied our water-pails for our morning's 
myself with the red handkerehief at wash. At such times we wished we 
the Fort, so as to be ready for an were in a good warm, bed, at home, 
occasion like this. and that we could sleep till noon. 

Much to my surprise and pleasure, * * 

the antelope, as soon as they saw it, In crossing the mountains, we met 

began to approach slowly. It seemed a party of Flat Head Indians who 

to me that it took them a long time, were going over to the Missouri basin 

but it probably was not more than to hunt buffalo. We found a few 

half an hour before they were within inches of snow on the divide, but had 

75 yards of me, standing still and a very pleasant trip. We had to find 

giving me an excellent chance for our own way, as there was little or 

a shot. I knew that hungry men were no trail — only one wagon having 

waiting for my shot with anxious gone over the year before. It was 

us 



n6 



RECREATION. 







\ 




rather a foolhardy undertaking for 
three city boys, but Providence was 
kind to us and we went through 
in safety. Although we were never 
overstocked with game, and for 
about io days were without fresh 
meat, we usually had either fish, par- 
tridges or venison enough to supply 
our needs. 

After about 275 miles of this travel- 
ing, we were glad to arrive at a place 
called " Hell Gate." I never ex- 
pected to be glad to get there, 
but I was this time. There we 
found a train of government 
wagons about to return to Walla 
Walla. They had brought up 
supplies for Lieut. Mullen's sur- 
veying command, which was to 
winter at Hell 
Gate. The Lieu- 
tenant in com- 
mand kindly 
asked us to 
transfer our lug- 
gage to one of 
the wagons and 
go on with him 
to Walla Walla, 
so we disposed 
of our cart and 
took only our 
saddle horses 
with us. We also 
disposed of our 
colored cook, 
who was insu- 
bordinate and 
impertinent. 

Soon after 
leaving us he 
stole a horse 
from one of the 
settlers, and the 
last we saw of 
him was on our 
first day's jour- 
ney out. We met 
him on a horse, 
with a log of 
wood tied under 
his arms, behind 
his back, a rope 
tied to him and 
held by a front- 
iersman, who 



n8 RECREATION. 

rode behind, with a loaded rifle the steamer via Isthmus of Panama, 

ready for instant use. About this time, the telegraph was 

At Cceur D'Alene we saw the priests completed, and ours was one of the 

at the mission, who were doing their first messages to go over it. Ourfami- 

best for the poor Indians, unselfishly, lies not having heard from us for near- 

for they could get no reward but ly a year, began to fear we had 

the satisfaction of doing good to been killed by hostile Indians, and 

their fellow men, the secret of the the news of our safe arrival at the 

greatest happiness, after all, that Golden Gate was of course an agree- 

this world can afford. able surprise to them. 

We arrived at Walla Walla about Mr. Lawrence and I visited the big 

the 1st of November, and after a trees, the Almeda quicksilver mines 

week's rest in the frontier mining and gold mines. Then we started by 

town, where we sold our horses, we steamer for New York via Panama, 

went by stage and steamboat to Port- When near Cuba, we were chased by 

land. There we took the steamer for a black steamer — either the Alabama 

San Francisco. or the Sumpter — but our captain had 

When we landed in San Francisco, all our lights put out, after dark, and, 

we were first-class cow-boys, dressed changed our course. Next morning 

in skin coats and trousers, flannel our pursuer was not to be seen, 

shirts and belts, with knives and We arrived safe in New York in 

revolvers strapped on our waists. February, 1862. 

Our capital was 25 cents among us * * * 

three. Notwithstandingour dress and I don't think I had a sick day all 

our light purse, we went boldly to this time. The life in the open air 

the Oriental Hotel (the fashionable and the constant exercise made me 

house of that day) about nine o'clock as hard as iron. I weighed 185 

on a fine Sunday morning. After pounds, and had muscles that could 

living so long and seeing only In- not be cut with a pair of scissors, 

dian squaws, we were quite over- * * * 

come by the great beauty of the In the spring of 1894, over 30 years 

ladies we saw taking their breakfasts after the conclusion of our trip, I was 

in fine gowns. They looked like an- sitting in the comfortable club-house 

gels to us. They were very kind to of the South Side Sportman's Club, 

us, even though we were dressed so at Oakdale, Long Island, by the big 

roughly. log fire, and, in course of conversation 

We knew that a cousin of Mr. with Col. Floyd-Jones, mentioned the 
Lawrence was in the city. On Mon- Rocky Mountains. He inquired 
day we looked him up. He intro- when I was there. I told him when 
duced us to a Mr. Redington, who, and where I crossed and that there 
when he heard how poor we were, had been a government wagon over, 
told me to draw on him for any sum the year before; that we were glad to 
less than $95,000 ; so I drew a fair find its track every five or ten miles, 
sum and Lawrence and I out- to show us the way. He said, "I was 
fitted ourselves with clothes, dress with that train, a lieutenant in the 
suits, etc., and remained to enjoy San United States Army." In our con- 
Francisco society which was decidedly versation we recalled many familiar 
gay. Cary sailed at once for home on faces and scenes. 

[the end.] 

Missin' your breakfast to catch a train 

Would make you feel quite vext ; 
Missin' the train would swell this refrain, 

But miss — in her bloomers comes next. 

M. H. Wright. 



A CLOSE CALL FOR GENERAL SHERMAN 



Lieutenant J. H. Sands, U. S. A. 



IT was in the spring of '71, while I 
was stationed with my company, 
"F" of the Sixth Cavalry, at 
Fort Griffin, Texas, that I saw one of 
the saddest and most harrowing" trage- 
dies of my army experience. General 
Sherman, then in command of the 
army, was on a tour of inspection to 
the different posts in the southwest, 
and had been sojourning at Griffin 
somewhat longer than usual, to pro- 
cure the necessary rest from a long 
trip over the plains. 

He contemplated going from Grif- 
fin to Fort Sill, in the Indian Terri- 
tory, and I had been detailed, with 
my company, to act as an escort to 
that point, starting one day later 
than he did, to overtake him at Jacks- 
boro and relieve the escort he had 
procured previous to reaching our 
post. We did some excellent march- 
ing the first day and had hardly be- 
come settled in camp when a courier 
arrived from General Sherman, who 
had preceded us some 50 miles, with 
the information that a party of Gov- 
ernment contractors, with supplies, 
had been massacred by the Indians 
directly on our route. We were or- 
dered to make a forced march so as 
to reach the scene at daybreak. 
Boots and saddles soon drew us into 
line and after marching all night we 
reached the scene of the killing. And 
such a sight ! Some 12 or 14 wagons 
had constituted the train. The mules 
had no doubt been stampeded, with 
the exception of several that were 
pierced by arrows and lay as they 
fell in the harness. Everything was 
in disorder, burning wagons and pro- 
visions were scattered over the plain 
for a radius of a hundred feet, while 
here and there, in groups, lay the 
bodies of the men, 14 in all, transfixed 
by arrows, with evidence that a reek- 
ing scalp had been torn from each 
head. I counted on one body nine 
arrows, probably the result of a des- 
perate resistance. 



The most sickening sight was of one 
large man who no doubt had endeav- 
ored to sell his life dearly. He had 
been chained to the spokes of a wag- 
on-wheel, and after being scalped 
had been roasted alive as his black- 
ened and charred body showed. 

Our first duty was to bury the bodies, 
which we did that day. Toward even- 
ing General McKenzie,with a detach- 
ment of the Fourth Cavalry, arrived, 
taking up the trail of the murderers 
which led on to the Kiowa Reserva- 
tion near Fort Sill, I. T. 

Investigation proved that old 
" Satanta," then the head chief of the 
Kiowas, with a portion of his band, 
had done the killing. He was .sub- 
sequently tried, with a sub-chief, and 
both sentenced to imprisonment for 
life. The sub-chief, en route to jail, 
stabbed a corporal who had them in 
charge, though not seriously, and was 
in turn shot dead by one of the 
escort. 

Satanta served several years in 
close confinement but was released 
on good behaviour only to resume 
his old occupation, and another 
bloody path marked his raids among 
the settlers. He was again corralled, 
the "poor Indian" again receiving 
the unjust (?) sentence of imprison- 
ment for life ; but finally, in an effort 
to escape, fell from a window, sustain- 
ing injuries that resulted in his In- 
coming a "good Indian," much to 
the satisfaction of the people of 
Northern Texas. 

The site of this, one of the many 
horrible attrocities committed by In- 
dians in that section, is now called 
"Bloody Prairie," from this massa 
and is some 50 miles southwest from 
Jacksboro. General Sherman often 
congratulated himself that In- had 
found such pleasant quarters at Grit- 
fin, for had he started one day soon< r 
no doubt he would have suffered the 
fate of the founders of " Bloody 
Prairie." 



120 



RECREATION. 



WHERE LEAPS THE OUANANICHE. 
E. L. Tiffany, M.D. 



Deep in the forest, grim and old, 
Far from the busy haunts of men, 

The sunny cascade woos the bold 
Into the shadows of its glen. 

Weird is the secret Nature holds, 
Of how that chasm vast was cleft 

Down through the mountain's Titan folds, 
Scatt'ring the hills to right and left. 

In the swift rapids hurrying by, 
Care-free the anglers gaily fish, 

And patient cast the gaudy fly 
Where lurks the wily ouananiche. 

Can we forget it, you and I, 

That sheltered nook, where, free from 
trouble, 
On mossy bank content to lie, 

We watched the whirlpool boil and bubble ? 



The falling water's silvery sheen, 

Those tow'ring walls of rock, moss-grown, 
Girt by a frame of living green; 

A wondrous picture, all our own. 

The envious sunbeams, peeping through 
Our thatch of hemlock boughs, that made 

Upon the fern leaves, wet with dew, 
A thousand fleeting forms of shade; 

The rock that from a pine tree tall, 

A muezzin from his minaret, 
Sent up to Allah his clarion call; 

Methinks I see them even yet. 

While life shall last — and waters play 
In light and shadow as of yore — 

Fond mem'ries of that happy day 
Will come to cheer us o'er and o'er. 



As up the steeps of youth we press, 
Or tread the slope of age along, 

Our hearts shall never cease to bless 
The sunny cascade's laughing song. 




"IN BERRY TIME. 
Amateur Photo by Frank E. Foster. 



RECREATION. 



121 




CHORUS OF FIVE VOICES, " I KILLED HIM, B' GOSH." 



Washington, D. C. 
Editor Recreation. 

I" send you a photograph of some of my 
hunting friends in Michigan. Colonel Foote, 
who occupies the centre of the group, lives 
in Kalamazoo. Major Kelsey, who is shak- 
ing hands with him, is another good fellow, 
stands well in his state, was a member of the 
Legislature several terms, and is a lawyer by 



profession. Mr. Cole, who stands next to 
Foote, is a fine old gentleman, has had lots 
of experience in hunting, and tells good 
stories of what he has passed through in that 
line. Beach and Hill are good sportsmen, but 
I know little of them. This party goes into 
the woods every year, for two weeks or more, 
starting about the ist of November. 

Charles S. Wheeler. 




MOUNTAIN LION, KILLED BY MR. G. B. SCHLEY, NEW YORK. 
Mounted by Prof. G. Stainsky, Colorado Springs. Col. 



122 



RECREATION. 




" I TANT LIFT IT, PAPA. 
From a photograph kindly furnished by Prof. J. M. Graves, Potsdam, N. Y. 



* Sheridan, Wyoming. 

Editor Recreation. 

I notice in the July number of Recrea- 
tion an article headed "Snobs in Business," 
which I know will appeal strongly to your 
thousands of readers, and I heartily thank 
my Denver friend for criticising so clearly 
and so justly the way in which a great many 
New York business men and their employees 
treat their customers. 

A man may walk into some of these houses 
and see anywhere from three to six clerks 
standing around idle, talking and joking with 
one another, and the customer may have to 
wait several minutes before they condescend 
to wait on him. They will notice the style of 
tie he wears and will size him up generally 
before speaking to him. They act as if doing 
him a great favor in asking what he wants. 

How differently the Western merchants 
and clerks treat their trade ! How different 
the reception given to callers on presidents 
or managers of great corporations ! These 
men always have a kind "good morning" 
for you however busy they may be ; and 
when your turn comes the inquiry, " Now 
what can I do for you ? " is so generous that 



it makes you feel at home. How much more 
agreeable it is to do business with such men, 
than to enter a place where you get a cold 
stare from everyone, from the office boy up 
to the head of the house ! There are plenty 
of business houses in New York where call- 
ers receive polite and courteous attention, 
but unfortunately the other class is in a large 
and disgraceful majority. They could not 
be more accurately or justly characterized 
than in the article entitled " Snobs in Busi- 
ness." 

I will guarantee that any man, woman or 
child, of whatever station in life, who calls 
at the office of Recreation and inquires 
for the head of that Magazine, will receive a 
hearty welcome, and will be made to feel at 
home. I am an Eastern man and it makes 
me feel ashamed of my early associates, 
when I hear the reports from my Western 
friends and neighbors, of the treatment ac- 
corded to them by these Eastern " Snobs." 

Mark R. Perkins. 

He shouldered his gun at break of day, 

Of his skill at sport he bragged, 
But when he came home, the knees of his pants 

Were the only things he had bagged. 



THE GREAT SPORTSMEN'S EXPOSITION. 



Continued from page 



The Burgess Gun Company, Buffalo, N. Y., 
displayed a full line of its novelties. Its repeat- 
ing shot gun is so well known as to netd no 
description here. Its lightning-like action, how- 
ever, attracted general attention. The magazine 
holds five cartridges and the chamber one. 
These can all be fired in less than two seconds. 
The folding gun is an innovation. It is in- 
tended not only for field shooting, but for use by 
troops, express guards and police, in close range 
work. When folded it may be carried in a 
holster, at the hip, as a revolver is carried. It 
weighs 5 to 64 pounds, and carries 6 cartridges. 
A folding rifle is being made by this company on 
the same plan, and will soon be put on the mar- 
ket. It is destined to become a great favorite 
with cowboys and others who ride a great deal. 



The Webster studio showed a full series of 
mounted specimens of game birds and animals, 
indicating the great skill of the secretary as a 
taxidermist. A register was here kept open for 
those who wished to become members of the 
Sportsmen's Association, and many names were 
recorded. 



The Gas Engine and Power Company, Morris 
Heights, New York, had on exhibition two of 
its naphtha launches that looked so neat, so cool, 
so clean, so handsome, so graceful, that many a 
man who saw them decided to quit smoking and 
save up his cigar money to buy a launch with, 
for next summer. 



Next to this stand was that of the Marlin Fire 
Arms Company, of New Haven, Conn., who 
showed some rifles that might properly be classed 
as jewelry. Some were trimmed in oxidized 
silver ; some were plated with gold, some with 
nickel and some with silver. Some were en- 
graved with pictures of game birds, animals or 
dogs, and by artists who know what a game 
bird, a bird dog or a game animal looks like. 
Some were stocked in natural white woods and 
so beautifully finished that when you saw them 
you wanted to stand there and look at them an 
hour or two. Then there were a lot of plain, 
every day Marlins, built to kill things with, and 
that looked as if they would do it if you would 
only give them half a chance. 



Charley Willard had charge of the elaborate 
display of guns, rifles and revolvers made by 
the Colt Patent Fire Arms Company, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., and to judge from the eager group 
of listeners that always -< hung upon the honey 
of his words," has lost none of his power as a 
gun orator. And well he might wax eloquent, 
for he had a great theme — a high grade gun, an 
excellent repeating rifle and the only complete 
line of revolvers made in this country. 



The American Smokeless Powder Company. 
New York and Baychester, N. Y., made an in- 
teresting display consi>ting of : i. W. A. sporting 
powder for shot guns; 2. Rifle powder; 3. 
Samples of cannon powder for various guns, 
showing size of grain ; 4. Iron and steel plates 
perforated wiih United States army bullet and 
W. A. rifle powder ; 5. Blocks of oak perforated 
in a similar manner ; 6. Sample patterns made 
with shot gun using W. A. sporting powder. 



The Bridgeport Gun Implement Company, 
New York and Bridgeport, Conn., made an ele- 
gant display of cleaning and loading tools for 
shot guns, rifles and revolvers. Special promi- 
nence was properly given to the new powder and 
shot measure, combination loading outfits, and 
the improved rapid loading machine. The 
powder and shot measure and implements manu- 
factured by the Bridgeport Gun Implement Com- 
pany are accepted as a standard of accuracv 
wherever firearms are used. This house also 
showed the Bridgeport cyclometer, " Brooklyn " 
and "Simplicity" bicycle stands, "Star" lamp 
brackets, and other sundries. 



Forest and Stream was there with an instruct- 
ive and entertaining exhibit of the implements 
used in hunting and fishing by Mr. Adam and seve- 
ral of his descendants, before the Winchesters, the 
Marlins, the Parkers, the Lefevers. the Reming- 
tons, Orvis, Chubb, the llortonsand others got 
their factories completed and ready for business 
F. & S. also exhibited Billy Hofer, one of the 
best all round guides and good fellows in the 
great and growing W r est. 



And last if not least comes RECREATION'S 
exhibit. It consisted of a typical hunter's cabin, 
furnished complete, as a hunter would furnish 
his home. It contained heads or skins of nearly 
every species of big game on this continent, 
all of my own killing. Prominent in this col- 
lection are the heads of three bull moose and one 
cow moose, killed near the Lake of the Wi 
in September, 1893. There is a head of a magnifi- 
cent mountain sheep, killed near the head of the 
Similkameen river, B. C. and another killed on 
Mt. Chopaca, Wash., this group being com- 
pleted by the heads of the female and young, 
both of which are rare in collections There is 
a head of a handsome buck antelope, killed on 
Flat Willow creek, Montana, at a measured dis- 
tance of 362 yards. The front of the cabin was 
surmounted by the head of an elk, killed 111 the 
Shoshone mountains, Wyoming, and bearing one 
of the largest pairs of antlers ever captuied in 
the United States. The main beams measure 
56 inches, with a spread of 57 inches. The 
horns measuie, around the burr, near ihe skull, 
15X inches, and around the beam, above the 
burr. 12 inches. 

Then there are heads of a female Rocky 



THE GREAT SPORTSMEN'S EXPOSITION. 



125 



Mountain goat, and of a kid about four months 
old. There is a head and skin of a great buffalo 
bull, killed on Cabin creek, a tributary of the 
Yellowstone river, in 188 1, from a herd which was 
estimated to number 200,000 This was the 
last large bunch of buffalo ever seen in the 
northwest It was practically exterminated dur- 
ing that year, and no other large band ever 
existed afterward. 

On the floor of the cabin is spread the skin of 
a silver-tip grizzly bear, killed on the summit of 
a peak of the Big Horn mountains, in the 
autumn of 1880. With two companions I dis- 
covered this bear on an open plateau, nearly a 
mile away We deployed, approached him from 
three different directions, and I opened fire on 
him at a distance of about 200 yards At the 
shot the bear raised on its haunches, looked 
around and my friends fired on him at that instant. 
Seeing himself surrounded and between three 
fires, he seemed to decide not to fight and 
started, with race-horse speed, for the nearest 
canyon. Other shots were fired at him as he 
ran. none of which took effect. I mounted my 
horse and started on a race to head the bear off, 
but before either of us reached the brink of the 
canyon, the first shot, which had passed through 
his lungs, took effect and he died. 

In my cabin were also exhibited over 60 guns 
and pistols, several of which have interesting 
and even romantic histories. Among the num- 
ber is a flintlock musket which was carried in the 
Revolutionary war, and another was carried in 
the Mexican war. Still another was dug up 
from the bottom of the Fox river, in Wisconsin, 
by a government dredge boat. It is of French 
manufacture, and was covered with four feet of 
mud, which had been deposited over it by the 
natural flow of the river. This indicates that it 
had been there many years, and it is supposed to 
have been lost by a member of Father Mar- 
quette's expedition, which passed up the Fox 
river, in canoes, in the early part of the 17th 
century. There is in this collection an old 
Kentucky rifle, with a barrel nearly five feet 
long, which crossed the plains, over the Bridger 
trail in 1853, and which, if its whole history 
were known, could no doubt tell of many bloody 
tragedies. There is one of the old Sharps 
buffalo guns, of 50 calibre, which weighs 16 
pounds, and which shoots 100 grains of powder 
and 600 grains of lead. This pattern of rifle, 
more than all others combined, exterminated the 
buffalo. Ninety per cent, of the old skin hunt- 
ers used this arm. One of these old, long 
haired vandals would sit behind a bunch of sage 
brush, or a rock, 500 to 800 yards from a herd, 
and would pick off the poor cieatures, one at a 
time, until 25, 50 or even 75 animals were killed 
out of the band before it would stampede. Then 
the hunter would follow up the band until he 
could get another stand, while his followers 
would go in and do the skinning. The stock of 
this old gun is sadly worn away by contact with 
the pommel of the saddle, indicating many years 
of active service. 

This collection of arms includes many of the 
earliest breech loaders, which proved total fail- 
ures in use, and which were discarded in their 
turn. Then there are several of the more 
modern breech loaders and repeaters which I 
have used in my hunting in the mountains and 



on the plains A 40 calibre hammerless Sharps 
has a record of 2 buffalo. 3 grizzlies, 2 black 
bears, 3 elk, 2 mountain sheep, 7 antelope, and 
13 deer. A 50-95 Winchester has killed 3 
elk, 2 grizzlies, 4 antelope, 3 mountain sheep 
and eight deer. A 45-90 Winchester has killed 
3 elk, 6 antelope and 7 deer. A 50-110 Win- 
chester has killed 3 moose, 1 black bear and 
several deer, wolvts, etc A collection of pistols 
varies from a little vest-pocket weapon, shooting 
a 22 calibre cartridge and measuring less then 
three inches in length, up to an ancient flintlock 
horse-pi>tol of 63 calibre and measuring 17 
inches in length. There are some curious 
"pepper boxes," a bayonet pistol, another 
which is handsomely and elaborately engraved 
and which has a folding trigger that is entirely 
out of sight until the hammer is raised, when it 
drops into position for use. Another novelty in 
this line has the hammer under the barrel ; still 
another has the hammer on one side ; t and another 
is a handsomely engraved and highly finished 
duelling pistol, of the type formerly used by the 
old-time southern men. 

On a bunk, in one corner of the cabin was a 
sleeping bag, which attracted a great deal of 
attention. It is made of waterproof canvas, lined 
with sheepskin, and so constructed that the 
hunter can crawl into it, button himself up and 
sleep outdoors in the worst blizzard that ever 
howled on the plains, meantime dreaming that 
he is sleeping on a hair mattress, in a well heated 
room at home. On a box in another corner of 
the room rested the skull of the grizzly bear that 
chewed up and nearly killed Ira Dodge, the 
famous guide and hunter of Wyoming. On the 
mantel, over the fire-place, was the skull of an 
alligator, killed in Florida. The reptile was 
over 12 feet long and was estimated to weigh 
over 300 pounds. 

There are in this collection some rich and 
novel specimens of Indian bead work ; an In- 
dian quirt ; a buckskin lariat ; a horsehair rope ; 
an old-time Mexican bit, handsomely inlaid with 
silver ; a pair of spurs decorated with the same 
precious metal ; a pack-strap ; many curious 
deformities cut from trees and bushes in various 
portions of the great forests ; a section of a birch 
tree. 16 inches in diameter, which was cut down 
by beavers, etc. 

I was assisted in keeping open house by Mr 
M. W. Miner, one of my old-time guides and 
hunting companions, from Idaho. He has 
traveled and hunted over a great deal of the far 
West, and tells many thrilling stories of his ex- 
periences. He had with him a little 25 -calibre 
Stevens pocket rifle, with a 16-inch barrel, with 
which, about two months ago, he killed a large 
bald-fac.-d grizzly bear. Mr. Miner has written 
the story of the tragedy and it is printed in this 
issue of Recreation, fully illustrated. I am 
also under obligations to my friends J . E. Thursby 
and Harry L Suydam, for valuable assistance in 
entertaining the thousands of visitors to my cabin. 



You have struck the keynote in giving the 
lovers of outdoor life such a magazine as Recre- 
ation. If all your readers enjoy it as much as 
I do your subscription list will be a remarkably 
large one by the end of the year. 

John Leasure, Tacoma, Wash. 



126 



RECREATION. 




WHY NOT WOMEN 'ALSO? . 
Mrs. J. W. Thew. 

We realize forcibly what it is to be " only a 
woman," when we hear our husbands plan- 
ning a hunting or fishing trip, in which 
we are not to participate. Our greatest con- 
solation, in such cases, is in the promises of 
an abundant supply of bear meat, venison, 
fish, etc. Such promises we had had to 
soothe us in our misfortune of belonging to the 
weaker sex up to the first of October, when 
we saw our "hero" with the "protectors" of 
seven other disconsolate wives, start for 
White Fish Lake in northern Michigan. 

Their first communication informed us 
that after a delightful trip they arrived at 
their destination, to find an old settler wait- 
ing at the little station to carry their bag- 
gage to the lake (a distance of six miles), 
while they walked through the woods ; that 
they had pitched their tent on a beautiful lit- 
tle stream emptying into the lake, were 
spending their time looking for deer signs, 
and had actually seen two deer, but had 
nothing but fine shot in their guns, and — 
well here again their noble natures asserted 
themselves, for it seemed cruel to shoot the 
first they saw. But they proposed to kill the 
next one they saw. They were living on 
small game, such as grouse, squirrels, fish, 
etc. 

Next, they have killed a fine buck weigh- 
ing 150 pounds; two of them carrying it 
three miles through the swamps, and into 
camp, heroes of the day. The next let- 
ter, and that which interested us most, 
was a night at "shining." We can best 
describe it as it was written to us. " Last 
night about nine o'clock, Mr. S. and I, 



with the boy hunter for a guide to pole for 
us, started out along the shore of the lake to 
shine for deer. S. sat in the front of the 
boat with a dark lantern fastened to his cap; 
I in the middle, the boy at the end poling. 
The moon had just gone down behind the 
timber. The dark timber cast a dismal 
shadow far out into the lake, while the light 
from the lantern lit up the shore a short 
distance, into the radiance of which we were 
all straining our eyes to catch the first 
glimpse of the shining eyes of a deer. Our 
boy noiselessly poled the boat along about 
20 yards from the shore for a half hour, 
when suddenly it stopped. I listened 
breathlessly and heard a splashing in the 
water. The boat was gently turned shore- 
ward, and by closely looking I saw two 
pairs of eyes looking at our light. Another 
push or two, and we were ready to shoot. I 
worked myself around, took aim, and 
waited for S. to shoot. He took the one on 
his side and I the other. We waited about 
10 seconds and bang went both guns. We 
could hear no sound but the echo of the guns. 
We quickly pulled ashore, and were about 
to jump out, when our guide told us to be 
careful, for if we had wounded a buck he 
would probably attack us. We landed and 
were soon bending over a fine deer." 

Our fondest hopes were realized when 
they returned, having gained much in ex- 
perience and avoirdupois; we having mean- 
while posted ourselves on how to cook veni- 
son — and we had some to cook, no matter 
where it came from. Next year we pur- 
pose going along, as experience is the only 
thing that will convince us there is not 
as much recreation and enjoyment in an out- 
ing of this kind for women as for men. 



LOST IN THE CHEAT MOUNTAINS. 

W. L. Washington ( Kildare ). 

FEW who have never visited that spection of the timber, we sat down 

region of West Virginia which and ate our lunch, 

lies in the vicinity of the mys- We were resting near the top of a 

terious Cheat River, have any con- high monntain, where a fine view of 

ception of the wildness and primi- the surrounding country could be 

tiveness of the country. For miles had for miles in every direction ; and 

in every direction there are no signs what a grand sight it was ! Not the 

of civilization. The dense forests slightest sign of the presence of man 

abound in game, such as deer, bear, was to be seen, and as we realized 

panthers, turkeys and grouse. what a wilderness we were in, we 

In the fall of 1891, with my friend, could not restrainafeelingof anxiety; 

Jack Mannion, a jovial Irishman, I but our guide assured us that he 

took a trip down in West Virginia to knew every inch of the ground and 

look over the country, with the com- could take us out with his eyes shut, 

bined object of hunting and of buying After an hour's rest we started on 

a piece of timber land. We closed the to further investigate the timber, 

business side of the trip at a little We walked until about three o'clock, 

town in the centre of the state, and during which time we crossed in- 

in the wildest portion of the Cheat numerable deer-paths and saw a 

Mountain range. We secured the quantity of small game, which we 

services of an old man as guide, who, did not shoot for fear of frightening 

although nearly eighty years old, was away the deer that we hoped to come 

the equal of any young man lever upon almost any minute. I suggested 

saw for tramping and climbing hills, that we had better retrace our steps. 

We started early one morning, with " Old Daddy " told us he was going 

our guns and Jack's dog, Jerry, an in- to take us out by another and shorter 

telligent and comical Irish water way, so we followed obediently, 

spaniel of the Patsy O'Connor order. About four o'clock we noticed that 

We were informed that we should the old man was getting less talka- 

find not only the finest of timber, but tive and seemed to be looking anx- 

an abundance of game, large and iously for a path that he had evidently 

small. missed ; and finally, after many de- 

The place we had in view was nials, he admitted that he had " clean 

about fifteen miles back in the moun- lost his bearings." To say we were 

tains. Two ranges had to be crossed mad is putting it mildly. When 

and then the top of the third moun- we gauged our appetites and found 

tain followed for about five miles, they had made an abnormal growth 

The old man was familiar with the during the afternoon, the thought 

country and amused us with the re- of sleeping in the mountains with- 

cital of his many adventures in the out food, was anything but com- 

hills before the railroad had come in. forting. A council of war was held 

His accounts of bear fights, deer and we began to rake the old man 

butcheries and rattlesnake nests were over the coals ; but he looked so old 

almost blood curdling, and were so and pitiable that we spared him. As 

interesting that under their influence we were all in the same box, we felt 

and that of the bracing atmosphere, sorry for him and accepted his ex- 

we moved merrily along at a brisk cuses with as good grace as possible. 

gait until the land of promise was After a ten minutes' discussion we all 

reached before we realized we had had different opinions as to how to 

traveled 15 miles. It was then get out. Jack was for following 

nearly noon, and after a short in- along the deer path on the top of 

127 



128 



RECREATION. 



the range until it should become too 
dark to travel farther, then putting 
up for the night, as best we could, 
and trying to get out the next morn- 
ing. 

I knew enough about the moun- 
tains to understand that such a course 
might lead us on for days. My plan 
was to go to the foot of the moun- 
tain and follow the first stream we 
came to, until it carried us to a larger 
one ; then we would soon be able to 
get out. The old man was so morti- 
fied that he would venture no sug- 
gestion. Finally I said : 

"Well I am going down the hill. 
If you men want to follow, all right. 
I shall go alone if you don't." 

I had not gone far when they 
called to me to wait and they would 
go with me. We got down in about 
half an hour, and struck a good sized 
stream which was full of the finest 
trout imaginable. We had shot a 
couple of squirrels and caught a few 
trout. With these we expected to 
make some sort of a supper when 
compelled to stop. 

We managed to travel along the 
stream, which was enclosed on both 
sides by laurel thickets, and which 
was dangerous on account of the 
slipper^ rocks and the many water- 
falls, the beauty of which we could 
not help admiiing, tired and hungry 
as we were. 

After we had traveled four or 
five miles along the stream, it became 
too dark to go farther, so climb- 
ing the hill a short distance, we 
camped under a large maple tree, 
whose extending boughs, although 
nearly devoid of leaves, we thought 
would protect us from the dew. 

We worked until dark, gathering 
boughs and brush for a bed, and fuel 
to keep up a fire. 

Jack had one match, and it was 
carefully guarded. Fortune favored 
us and we soon had a good fire roar- 
ing. We had commenced to feel as 
comfortable as our situation would 
admit and were regaining our good 
humor and spirits, when we were 
delighted bv hearing a long-drawn 
" hallo-o-o-o'." 



Jack and I both jumped to our feet 
and answered, but the old man only 
drew closer to the fire. The call was 
repeated, and, straining our lungs to 
the utmost, we shouted, 4< Come down 
here, we're lost." Wondering at the 
old man's silence, we looked at him 
and noticed that he was crouching 
near the fire in terror. Not under- 
standing the situation, and fearing 
he had been leading us into some 
trap, we demanded an explanation. 
The old man said : 

" Boys, you're answering a painter. 
I saw one killed in here last fail, and 
its pelt measured 10 feet from tip to 
tip. 

We did not fully realize the dan- 
ger, and as we had a pretty good fire 
going by this time, were not much 
alarmed, although we were soon able 
to note the calls of two panthers 
answering each other. They gradu- 
ally drew nearer to us, and soon we 
could hear the low growl that fol- 
lows the loud call. We had only 
enough wood gathered to last about 
two hours, and the old man, in his 
fright, threw the entire lot on the 
fire, to make a big blaze to keep 
the " varmints " off. When we saw 
that something had to be done to 
replenish the pile, and that, too, 
quickly, we felt not a little nervous. 
Daddy declared flatly he would not 
move five feet from the fire to save 
his life ; so there was nothing to be 
done but for Jack and me to go after 
more wood. 

We made the guide agree that if 
we gathereel sufficient wood to keep 
up a fire till morning, he would sit 
up and keep the fire going. He said 
he wouldn't dare close his eyes with 
"them painters a howlin' round." 

Tremblingly we walked out into 
the darkness, one of us carrying a 
burning brand in one hand, which 
was waved around wildly, while in 
the other a gun was held ready to 
use at a moment's notice. Working 
in this way for an hour and a half, 
we accumulated enough fallen limbs, 
logs, etc., as we thought, to last till 
morning. Then, cutting a lot of 
branches from the tree we were un- 



LOST IN THE CHE A T MOUNTAINS. 1 29 

der, we fixed up a brush bed, and to pick up both guns (the guide had 
with our feet toward the fire, pre- no gun), and soon joined me, threat- 
pared to sleep. ening to blow the old man full of 

The old man sat silently in front holes if he did not throw his knife 
of the burning logs, peering out into out to us. He surrendered, and we 
the darkness. The sounds that came back to the fire, 
greeted our ears were anything but There was no more sleep for any 
reassuring, though we had become of us that night, and this little epi- 
accustomed to them in a measure by sode had put us in a good humor all 
this time. The panthers continued around. To our dismay it soon be- 
to call at intervals. The wild cats gan to rain heavily. We moved the 
added their cries, and the coons, fire closer to the trunk of the tree 
down by the water's edge, whistled where we sat, getting first one side 
gleefully. wet and then drying it, while the 

I lay there listening and thinking other became soaked. One becomes 

for fully an hour, but could not accustomed to almost anything in 

sleep. The strange thoughts that time, and after a few hours we 

came to me were anything but con- commenced to look around for some 

soling. While ruminating, with eyes diversion. The rain had driven the 

half closed, I was at first astonished most of the animals away by this 

and afterward amused, to see the time, and we had ceased to be 

old man leave his post at the fire alarmed by their cries. It was about 

and, after scrutinizing us for a min- three o'clock when Jack dropped a 

ute, deliberately but carefully pull cartridge in the fire behind old 

some of our bedding from under us Daddy. In a moment it went off,, 

and, curling himself up with his feet and the old man jumped about six 

to the fire, settle down for a snooze, feet. We asked what it was, and he 

In five minutes he was snoring so said it was " the heat a bustin' them 

loudly that the other sounds of the —rocks." 

woods seemed as naught. W 7 e treated him to a number of 

Letting him sleep for half an hour, these explosions, which he always 

and noticing that the fire was getting explained in the same way, and 

low, I nudged Jack and told him to heaped further imprecations on 

keep quiet, and we would have some " them durned rocks." Finally, a 

fun. Raising Jerry in my arms, I whole handful of shells was dropped 

leaned over, and holding him about in the fire behind the old chap. A 

two feet above our sleeping guide series of explosions followed that 

and " guard," let him fall. Jerry unnerved him and blew out the fire, 

weighs about 60 pounds. He fell but he never suspected the cause of 

all in a heap on the old man's it. When we told him afterward, he 

stomach. With a yell, Daddy sprang said he "wished he'd a knowed it at 

to his feet, pulled a knife, and was the time ; he'd a made it hot for us 

about to start in to annihilate the young uns." 

" painter," when he recognized Jerry. So the night wore on. The first 

Realizing that he had been asleep ray of light, about five o'clock, was 

and that Jerry's actions were very hailed with delight, and we resumed 

unusual, he glanced toward us. We our march. 

feigned sleep poorly on account of After a tramp that was much 
shaking with suppressed laughter. shorter than we expected, our stream 
The old chap saw what was up, and, led us to the Cheat river, and we 
Jerry having escaped, was bound to reached our stopping-place that day. 
vent his rage on something. With We ate an enormous supper, 
an oath, and uplifted knife, he sprang breakfast and dinner combined, 
toward me. I jumped up and lit out and then turned in and slept the 
in the darkness, leaving my gun. sleep of the just until the next morn- 
Jack had presence of mind enough ing. 



FLY FISHING. 



M. G. Ellzey, M. D. 



HE who knows not, let him un- 
derstand that fly-fishing is an 
exquisite art, based on a con- 
crete science. Its successful practice 
develops a true eye, a steady hand, a 
delicate touch, quick perception, close 
observation, ready memory, accurate 
knowledge of the habits of species, as 
they vary with local environment, 
and, besides all this, an extensive as- 
sortment of miscellaneous scientific 
knowledge. Divers romantic writers 
have needlessly obscured the sub- 
ject with extravagant perplexities 
and endless fooleries. The best ang- 
lers, nevertheless, are simplest in 
their methods. From the hygienic 
point of view fly-fishing is a recrea- 
tion worthy of all acceptation ; healer 
and comforter of such as be broken 
in body and spirit in the rude en- 
counters of modern life ; develop- 
er of muscular volume and tone, 
and the strength of disused and ema- 
ciated limbs ; distancer of all path- 
ies and movement cures, itself the 
chief of all movement cures. To 
wade five or six miles down a head- 
long mountain stream paved with 
loose ancj slippery stones, stemming 
an endless succession of leaping cas- 
cades, foaming pools and strong, 
swift rapids ; casting, now with the 
right hand, now with the left, under 
overhanging boulders and banks, and 
again straight away 60 feet down 
stream, letting fall the flies at the de- 
sired spot with unfailing precision, 
ever and anon bringing to landing 
net and creel a lusty trout — this is 
sport, indeed. It involves a flexibil- 
ity of limb, an elasticity of muscle, 
an undulating ease of motion and 
graceful pose which, to a ballet 
dancer, would be worth a fortune. 
Consider, moreover, the surround- 
ings. Magnificent scenery, vivified 
by the ever-varying play of light and 
shade, sunshine and shadow ; the 
fragrance and beauty of early blos- 
soms ; the music of flowing waters ; 



the wild, sweet melody of birds ; an 
atmosphere pure and undefiled. Sub- 
merged in the midst of such enjoy- 
ments, ought not a sick man to be 
made well again ? For the compe- 
tent enjoyment of this queen of 
sports and pastimes no unusual gifts 
and endowments are necessary, as is 
the case, truly, with the great masters 
of the beautiful art. To become a 
good fly-fisher only patience, perse- 
verance and good-sense are neces- 
sary. The same are the requisites for 
the good still-hunter. For the great 
masters of that craft, also, gifts are 
necessary, like those of "the grand 
old masters" in music, in poetry, 
in sculpture, in painting. 

Neither in fly-fishing are expensive 
outfits necessary. Let everything be 
useful, simple and durable. In the 
presence of great Nature's rugged 
grandeur every thing for ostentation 
is badly out of place. Nature abhors 
a vacuum, and the physical embodi- 
ment of vacuity is a dude. The sine 
qua noji of a fly-fisher's outfit is a 
good rod, and of the bait-caster's out- 
fit a good reel. I have handled fly- 
rods, so styled, with which casting 
the fly was more laborious than split- 
ting -rails. In casting with a good 
fly-rod there is no consciousness 
of muscular effort ; nor at the 
close of day, when all the moun- 
tain paths grow dim, any sense 
of weariness, nor painful soreness of 
wrist and forearm and shoulder. As 
to the material of rods, I am no 
enthusiast about splic bamboo. A 
cheap rod of that description is a de- 
lusion and a snare; for just when the 
sport is at its best, and there is no 
other rod within three days journey, 
then that cheap bamboo will come 
all to pieces ; and if ever, under 
any circumstances, that man will 
curse, he will curse then. Even 
a high-priced, well-made split bam- 
boo is a holiday affair. The steel 
rods I have handled have not been 



130 



FLY FISHING. 



131 



satisfactory. The action of the 
rod in casting is almost confined 
to the tip, the very worst of all 
possible things in a fly rod. I am 
told, however, they have lately been 
very greatly improved. There seems 
no good reason why they may not be 
so perfected that, in balance and 
action, they may surpass all other 
rods, as they doubtless do now in 
strength and durability. Up to this 
hour, nevertheless, I prefer a good 
fly-rod of wood to any other I have 
handled. A combination of ash and 
lancewood makes a rod very effective 
and pleasant in action, but ash and 
lancewood both have the fault of sag- 
ging or bowing, in the slender parts of 
the rod after prolonged use. The 
only wood absolutely free from this 
grievous fault is the bois d'arc. I 
have a rod which I made of this wood 
in 1875, which I prefer to any I have 



ever handled, and I have, conse- 
quently, done the greater part of my 
fishing with it for 19 years past. Not 
even the tip has ever been fractured 
and the rod is to-day absolutely 
true and straight, as it was the first 
time it was ever put together. I have 
a most excellent rod of red cedar for 
butt and middle, and bois d'arc for 
tip. There is very little difference in 
the weight and springiness of the 
two woods, but the bois d'arc is 
much less snappy than the cedar. 
This is an old rod, and age has rend- 
ered the two woods so nearly the 
same color that few persons perceive 
any difference. Probably a better 
combination is yellow mulberry and 
bois d'arc. I have a rod of this sort 
very delightful in action. 

I may, later, tell what I know 
about other parts of the fly-fisher's 
outfit. 



A HALF-HOUR WITH THE QUAIL. 

Dr. E. P. Kremer (Juvenis). 



THE unprecedented snow storm 
of March, 1893, made quail 
very scarce in Pennsylvania the 
following fall, so, when I was told of 
a bevy of "at least thirty," it seemed 
the proper thing to invite friend 
John to go with me and investigate 
them. 

Well, we did not find them though 
we worked over a large territory, and 
finally found ourselves in the moun- 
tain where we hoped for a grouse 
or two. Neither did we find them, 
and, returning toward our team, 
while going up a little ravine through 
which babbled a ribbon of a rill, we 
caught sight of my little Irish setter 
Lorna on the side of a bowl-shaped 
hollow, high up, and stiff as a poker. 
" Doc, look at Lorna, I believe she 
is pointing." " Of course she is, but 
what the deuce can it be, for there is 
no cover?" We walked carelessly 
on, when suddenly up went a small 
bevy of quail 20 feet below the little 
red dog. 



Quick as a flash our guns flew to 
our shoulders and each dropped a 
bird, but mine fell in such a tangle of 
brush that it was never recovered. 

The birds had taken to a perfect 
wilderness of scrub oaks, where we 
raised a few, and also a grouse, but 
none were brought to bag, so we 
gained our team, stored Lorna and 
Ned in the warm straw and started 
for home, bewailing our hard luck 
and the scarcity of birds. There was 
considerable talk, too, of our good 
red dogs, for Ned was a veteran hard 
to beat on quail, while thirteen- 
months-old Lorna was a phenom- 
enon. 

About 4 o'clock the mare was jog- 
ging along some five miles trom town 
when John suddenly pulled up and 
exclaimed excitedly, 

" Doc ! Doc ! look there, right in 
the road." 

I looked and there, not more than 
a dozeir yards ahead of us in the 
road, were ten plump quail. 



132 



RECREATION. 



"Quick, get the guns out while I 
tie the horse." John was out in a 
jiffy, while the birds ran up the bank 
into a field as I nervously put the 16 
bores together. 

The moment the dogs were out of 
the wagon the birds rose and I 
marked them drop into a pasture 
where a slight rocky mound was 
overgrown with briars and a few 
trees. 

We swung behind and around it to 
give the dogs the wind. Lorna was 
off like a cyclone with old Ned 
closely following. 

As we rounded the mound we came 
upon Ned, head up and stiff as iron. 

"John, Lorna has them." 

"Undoubtedly ; for Ned is backing;" 
and a few steps revealed Lorna on a 
beautiful point. Passing Ned, who 
never broke his back, we advanced 
upon Lorna, when the whole bevy 
rose and scattered. 

John missed his first, which I 
doubled up as it went like a bullet 
over my head, and then turning 
grassed another with my left, just as 
a third came whirling down to John's 
second barrel. 

" Where did they go, John?" 

"Just across the road; come on." 

" Go ahead, I'll be with you as 
soon as I get my birds;" for I never 
allow my dogs to retrieve during the 
first year. 

As I climbed the fence a minute 
later I looked across the road in time 
to see Ned on a fine point, with John 
anxiously awaiting my arrival. 

"Go on, John, don't wait for me;" 
and in a moment the bird was flushed 
and neatly dropped. By this time 
I was in the field, but where was 
Lorna? Nowhere to be seen. I was 
certain she crossed the road with me. 



As I walked up to the fence to see 
what had become of her, a bird rose 
under the bank and flying low along 
the fence, escaped without a shot; 
and there stood Lorna just as when 
she found the bird. 

A run through the field was unpro- 
ductive, and again, as we turned to 
the road, Lorna was missed. It was 
growing dark when we spied her 
wheeling like lightning to a point in 
the pasture, and, going over,we raised 
two birds. I dropped mine but John's 
kept on down along the fence as far 
as we' could see. Starting after it 
both dogs trailed and trailed until 
the missing bird was carefully 
rounded up by the experienced Ned 
and downed by John as it quartered 
to his left. 

"Hear them call, Doc, right up 
along the fence under those cherry 
trees. Come on or we won't be able 
to see before long." 

We went. Lorna pointed and I 
missed them. Ned pointed and John 
missed. Then both pointed and we 
both missed. 

By this time the little mare had 
almost escaped from her hide at her 
efforts to get away from our can- 
nonading (though it was wood 
powder), and reluctantly we turned 
toward the wagon and were soon 
homeward bound. Lighting our 
cigars we sped along at a smart pace 
and recounted as we went the mag- 
nificent work of Lorna. For it was 
magnificent : it was phenomenal. 

Though but a puppy, she behaved 
like a veteran, and though Ned is a 
"corker," John cheerfully acknow- 
ledged that he had never seen such 
quick, snappy, positive work by any 
dog in all his life as that done by 
Lorna. 



Although my pa a jiner was, 
An' kep' the nails a jinglin', 

He didn't do it all, becuz 
My mother did the shinglin'. 

Pa said he was the whole blamed ship, 

The mainstay an' the anchor ; 
But then I think he made a slip, 

"Cuz mother was the spanker. 

Boston Courier. 




WBT* 




6K 



TJIE ItflST 

.. .. 0F THE AZTECS. 



Dr. Edward J. Tucker. 



Chapter VII. 

ALLEN MEETS A COUNTERFEITER. 

Some months passed, during which 
I devoted myself to the farm in a man- 
ner Steve had never done. I worked 
in a feverish desire to forget Steve and 
Jessie, and not for any love of the farm. 
At night, when my tasks were over, I 
would wander down to the old bridge 
and recall the incidents of the )ear 
that had wrought great changes in my 
life and nature. I was no longer the 
careless, heedless boy I had been. I 
cared no more for field sports and had 
lost all desire for a medical education 
The products of the farm sold well, 
and I could have continued to make 
money if I had had the ambition to 
amass wealth, but my heart was dead 
and 1 had no object in life. 

As the months rolled on, I became 
more reconciled to my lot. The bitter- 
ness that made life a burden wore away, 
and I could think of Jessie without the 
pangs that had formerly made me the 
most miserable of men. My love was 
as deep and intense as ever, but the 
consciousness that there was no hope 
kept it from burning at a fever heat. I 
even persuaded myself I could look 
upon her and Steve together without a 
quiver. 



As the spring softened the frozen 
earth and I was getting ready to start 
the p'ow, I received a visit from my 
nearest neighbor, who made me a flatter- 
ing offer to buy or lease my farm ; an 
offer I still had under consideration. 

One beautiful spring Sunday morning 
I dressed myself in anew suit of clotb.es 
I had ordered in town. Why 1 did this 
I would not own, even to myself; and, 
as I stood looking in the mirror at my 
rugged healthfulness, a little voice 
whispered, "Would you not like Jessie 
to see you now? Remember, she has 
always seen you at a disadvantage, and 
the present time is not unfavorable to 
you." 

I rather liked the idea of her seeing 
me when my features were not con- 
vulsed with rage, my hair unkempt, 
when not clad in ragged shirt and 
trousers, — the latter supported by one 
brace and fastened at the waist 1 
hickory pin in lieu of a button. 

In half an hour I was driving slowly 
to town, still undecided as to whether 
I was acting wisely in again placing my- 
self under the influence of a love whose 
hopelessness had made me so unhappy. 
As I crossed the bridge I saw a man, 
about two years my senior, sitting on 
the coping, with his legs hanging over 
the stream. He was of medium size, 



i33 



134 



RECREATION. 



had an open countenance, lighted by 
blue eyes, and a wealth of curly hair 
clustered about his forehead. "Just 
the man." I thought, " for a girl to fall 
in love with." 

" Hallo, stranger ! " he exclaimed, as 
I came abreast of him. " Are you 
going to town ? " 

I answered in the affirmative. "Well," 
he continued, " I'll go with you." 

I pulled up, and as he got in the 
carriage, I remarked, sarcastically, 

" You seem confident you have only to 
invite yourself to a lift, and get it." 

He burst into a peal of laughter. " I 
go on the principle that every one 
desires my company. You see, my 
nerve is sufficient enough for a com- 
mercial traveler." 

" Are you one ? " I inquired. 

" No," he answered meditatively, "I 
have not struck that line yet ; I have 
been most everything, but just now I 
am a ship's purser on a furlough." 

" Indeed ! it must be pleasant, sail- 
ing to different parts of Jthe world." 

"Well enough, if you are in a vessel 
with a roving commission ; but in that 
case there would be no money in it. I 
make five times the amount of my 
salary in smuggling, and in shoving the 
queer, on a regular liner." 

" Shoving the queer ? " 

" Yes," he answered with a reckless 
laugh. " When I am in Havana, Cuba, 
Campeachy, y Tuspan, Tampico, and other 
ports ( f Mexico, I buy large amounts 
of goods and pay for them in counter- 
feit money, which is so deceptive in 
appearance that it passes through 
several hands before being discovered. 
The goods I purchase are smuggled 
into Philadelphia, if possible, otherwise 
I pay duty." 

"It must be a risky business," I re- 
marked. 

" My nature craves a certain amount 
of excitement, which is furnished by my 
mode of living. Now our last trip will 
give an illustration of the excitement I 
derive from smuggling. 

" The ship's steward, a fellow by 
the name of Breen, and myself, deed- 
ed there was a chance of running 
through some cigars. We purchased 
40,000 Havanas, which we sewed in 
rubber bags. These were to be dropped 
over the side as we passed Indian 
river, or cape Henlopen, on a signal 



from a small yacht. If we passed in 
the night the signal would be three 
flashes of a white light, followed by a red 
and then a green ; if during the day the 
yacht was to cross our bows trolling for 
blue fish; and if all was clear, trure 
would be a general waving of handker- 
chiefs ; otherwise the yachtsmen would 
attend solely to fishing. 

" We arrived off the Delaware before 
falling in with the yacht, and laid our 
course to approach within a few hun- 
dred yards of the yacht which we saw at 
anchor, as the captain and crew were 
generally interested in these transac- 
tions. Latterly, however, so much had 
been confiscated, no one would enter in 
this venture but the steward, though all 
were willing in a passive way to do their 
utmost to make the venture a success. 
As we approached the yacht we waved 
our handkerchiefs, but no notice was 
taken of us. 

" I wonder what they mean?" asked 
the steward; "can an officer be on 
board?" 

"No," I replied. "I know every one 
on board and I can see into the cabin ; 
they are all friends " 

" Suppose we drop the bags over- 
board?" 

" Suppose you do nothing of the 
kind," remarked the first mate. " There 
is a revenue cutter coming from behind 
the lightship." 

" We tin ned anxiously in the direction 
indicated and saw a cutter coming at a 
gait that would land her alongside of us 
in a few minutes. 

" It's all up, boys," said the mate, 
"get those cigars under cover and on 
the manifest as quickly as possible." 

" We hurried below. I to consign the 
cigars to Senor Verastique, Vera Cruz, 
and Breen to store them in a closet in 
his room. We completed our arrange- 
ment and reached the spar deck as the 
customs officials came on board. The 
leader, a stout man by the name of 
MaGee, said, sneeringly: 

"Well, gentlemen, you have not been 
able to purchase any fish, have you?" 

"No," I replied. 'When we want 
fish, we drop a troll overboard." 

" Not baited with cigars, I hope," he 
answered, with a leer. 

"What do you mean, sir?" I de- 
manded, pretending to be indignant. 

" Oh, nothing. I see a sloop out yon- 



GUATEMOTZIN ; THE LAST OF THE AZTECS. 



5 



der fishing, and I think that perhaps 
they are fishing for cigars." 

" A queer kind of fish to be found in 
these waters," remarked the mate. 

"Not at all," smilingly responded 
MaGee ; " they are sometimes found in 
immense quantities." 

" I see," I broke in angrily. It was 
bad enough to be foiled in our purpose 
without being made a laughing-stock. 
" You are bent on picking a quarrel 
with us ; well, sir, you can have it just 
as soon as you wish." 

" I believe/' he answered, " I have 
spoiled a little game here, but I am per- 
forming my duty, just as you would do 
if you were in my position. It is the 
fortune of war and we will not bandy 
further words about it. Where is your 
manifest ? " 

11 Below," I responded, sullenly. 

"Very well." He turned to his as- 
sistant who had stood quietly by, " Tom! 
I will go below and look over the mani- 
fest, while you .search the ship." 

I led the way to my office followed 
by MaGee, Breen, and the mate. After 
handing the manifest to the official I 
threw myself on my berth and waited 
the inevitable. MaGee slowly read 
down the paper until he came to the 
entry, when a prolonged whistle indi- 
cated his satisfaction. He fairly beamed 
at me as he peered over the top of his 
spectacles. 

" Well," he said. " It's too bad ; 
40,000 cigars. Do you know ? " he went 
on in a confidential sort of way, "that if 
I were an expert in chirography, I 
should say this entry was made within 
the hour. The ink is not yet dry." 

" What are you going to do about it ?" 
I inquired, gloomily. " The entry is 
there, and there is no attempt at smug- 

gling." 

" Where are these cigars ? " 

"In the steward's room." 

I led the way to the steward's room 
and indicated the closet containing the 
cigars. MaGee opened the closet, 
counted the boxes, and remarked that 
as they were consigned to Vera Cruz 
he would be obliged to put the seal 
of the Custom House on the closed 
boxes. 

I sullenly assented and moodily 
watched the proceedings. As MaGee 
finished, Breen said. " Of cornse, we 
bear you no resentment for doing your 



duty, Mr. MaGee ; in proof of which I 
wish you to join me in a glass of fine old 
Madeira I obtained from a Spanish mail 
steamer in the gulf." 

" With all my heart," responded Ma- 
Gee, heartily, setting down the wax 
taper and seal on the table. 

" I'll be hanged if I drink with him," 
I replied, observing Breen frantically 
shaking his head in the negative behind 
the officer's back, and pointing to the 
table. 

" Well, if you want to sulk, we can do 
without you," said the steward. " Come 
to the saloon, MaGee, and I will give 
you a drink of a choice brand ot the 
captain's Madeira." 

" All right," responded MaGee, who 
was an old toper and whose failing 
Breen was aware of. As MaGee and 
the mate followed the steward into the 
saloon that adjoined Breen 's stateroom, 
I hurriedly seized the wax, plunged it 
into the flame of the taper I had lighted, 
and dropped huge globules upon some 
writing paper. I had taken a doz^ n 
impressions of the seal before I heard 
Breen talking in a loud voice. I hur 
riedly hid the impressions under a pil- 
low and threw myself into the bunk. 
.MaGee entered, followed by the stew- 
ard, who was talking loudly. 

"You miserable old carcass !" he ex- 
claimed. "Do you mean to deny me a 
thousand cigars after swilling my Ma- 
deira? By the great horn spoon, I 
wish it had burned your leathery old 
throat." 

" Now, look here," replied MaGee, 
taking his seal and turning on the stew- 
ard, " if you don't keep a civil tongue 
in your head I'll have you arrested for 
bribery." 

"I suppose you have witnesses to 
prove you are not trying to force us to 
give you a thousand cigars," I sarcastic- 
ally replied ; but you must remember 
those cigars are regularly entered on 
the manifest and consigned to Vera 
Cruz." 

u Yes, and I will take gO< d care that 
they go there, if I am obliged to have 
the whole coa>t under surveillance from 
here to Florida." 

"You have done your worst.'' I re- 
torted. " Now get out of here and ' 
us in peace." 

"After looking at the seal he left the 
stateroom. Breen and I burst into a 



n6 



RECREATION. 



peal of laughter that caused MaGee to 
peer in and say : 

"You have cause for laughter, gentle- 
men, if 40,000 cigars are a subject of 
mirth." 

We arrived at Philadelphia the next 
morning and proceeded to unload. I 
made arrangements with a truck driver 
to deliver our cigars to their destination. 
Each day we would break the seal, ab- 
stract 5,000 cigars and replace the 
broken seal by softening the back of one 
of the impressions, applying it over the 
string and lock. It was impossible to 
tell that the seal had been tampered 
with. Twice each day MaGee exam- 
ined the seal, when we made it so hot for 
him that he left the stateroom as soon as 
duty permitted. 

In this manner we contrived to get 
the 40,000 to our consignee and event- 
ually proceeded down the river with 
MaGee on board. He now importuned 
us for a few cigars, which all hands were 
puffing, for on this occasion discipline 
was lax. Finally, opposite Cape Henlo- 
pen, the cutter ranged alongside and 
MaGee came to the stateroom door and 
said : 

" Boys, that seal is of no further use and 
you may break it. If you will not give 
me some cigars, will you sell me a box ?" 

''I am sorry to say I have only suffi- 
cient for home consumption," I said, 
biting the end of a fine Henry Clay. 

"Nonsense!" replied the officer. 
''You have 40,000 cigars in that closet." 

" Is that so ?" I responded. " Well, 
if I have 40.000 cigarsyou may open the 
closet and take a box." 

" Thank you," replied MaGee with 
alacrity, pausing a moment to inspect 
the se.il ; then taking hold of the end of 
the string he tore it off. I threw him 
the key, which he inserted into the lock 
and opened the door. Of course there 
were no cigars there. 

"With peals of laughter, Breen and I 
threw ourselves into each other's arms 
and danced hilariously, shouting in 
chorus, "Outwitted !" 



With face suffused with rage he shook 
his fist at us and cried 

" I'll have you prosecuted as sure as 
my name is McGee." As he ascended 
the side of the ship I handed him a 
handful of cigars. " To show I have no 
ill feeling, McGee," I said. He took 
them with the remark, " You outwitted 
me this trip, but expect no mercy when 
I catch you again." 

As my companion finished his story 
I laughed heartily. We were now near 
the city and I was about to whip up, 
when just ahead I spied Jessie and her 
father They were hurrying along as 
fast as the feebleness of the old gentle- 
man permitted. The tolling of the 
church bells told me they had wandered 
farther than they intended and were now 
late for service; there was a nervous in- 
tensity in their stride that indicated 
their anxiety. 

Pulling up sharply, I directed my 
companion's attention to the couple and 
said: 

" Those people are dear friends of 
mine, with whom I am not on speaking 
terms. The gentleman is a minister 
and is late for church. I am going to 
get out and I desire you to do me the 
favor to surrender this carriage to them 
and request them to leave it under the 
shed, in the rear of the church. Prom- 
ise me you will not allow them to know 
that they are indebted to any but your- 
self, as I would rather die than have 
them know I sent you." 

" Very well," he replied, as I alighted, 
" wait a moment and 1 will walk into 
town with you." 

" No ! I am going a route you would 
not care to take; in fact I am going 
over the field to their church, and wish 
to get there first." 

" All right; good-bye. By the way, 
to whom have I been indebted this 
morning?" 

"Allen Olney." 

With a nod he drove off and I sprang 
over a fence to make a short cut to the 
church. 



(to be continued.) 



THE GENESIS OE THE METALLIC CARTRIDGES. 



l 37 



THE GENESIS OF THE METALLIC 
CARTRIDGES. 

Capt. Philip Reade, U. S. A. 

In 1886 George W. Morse patented a mov- 
able base cartridge. The rear end is closed by 
a flanged-headed reinforce cup which enters 
into the case for a distance not exceeding 
a quarter of an inch. This is driven into the 




THEhJElALUC Qf\pTF\lDGE.lpVENTED IfJ l&jrf 



GEOftGE W. MORSE Of /V]flS& ?f\J. I&J8 

rear end of the unexpanded case water tight, 
or just as the percussion primer fits in its cap 
pocket. Its front edge is covered and packed 
with a rubber ring about one-twentieth of an 
inch thick. At first, this rubber ring was cut 
from machine-drawn rubber tubing ; after- 
wards, it was moulded. " Nothing does so 
perfectly as rubber," says Mr. Morse. " My 
model cartridges were prepared by hand 
tools, constructed by myself. All of my 
models are roughly made ; 1 have not the 
means to perfect these devices." 

On June 17, 1885, General S. V. Benet, 
Chief of Ordnance, U. S. A., directed the 
commanding officers of Frankford Arsenal, 
Penn., to convene a board to consist of Lieu- 
tenants MacNutt and Baker and Mr. Gill, 
master armorer, to examine and try the 
Morse sliding base, rubber, gas-check brass, 
also copper, movable base cartridges. The 
inventor called them, " The Morse movable- 
base cartridges." Some were brass cases with 
copper bases; some were brass cases with 
brass bases. They were tested in competi- 
tion with Frankford Arsenal copper shells 
by J. E. Carr. 

As a result, Mr. Morse asked to have his 
cartridges " submitted to any test that human 
skill could devise." The tests lasted for 
twelve months. The Arsenal trials included 



the dry metal tests— trying to break the case 
in the gun; trials to ascertain the best length 
and forms of movable base; strength of cap 
pocket; trying different methods of crimping 
the shell to hold the ball; trying annealing 
the mouth of the case to prevent splitting; 
covering many thousands of fires, sometimes 
200 rounds from a single shell— all done 
without care or regard to the extraction of 
the shell. 

No instance occurred where the gun failed 
to extract the whole case when opened, 
whether it had been resized before firing or 
not. The firing of a single Morse shell in the 
same gun without resizing was carried to 
over 100 rounds without injury. 

On May 27, 1886, the Chief of Ordnance, 
U. S. A., General Benet, notified Mr. V. D. 
Stockbridge, attorney for Mr. Morse, that 
the merits of the Morse cartridge had im- 
pressed him so favorably, after Departmental 
trial, that he had ordered 1,000,000 of them 
made for issue to the Army for thorough 
trial in the hands of troops during the en- 
suing summer. He stated that " vulcani/ed 
rubber has been found to stand the test of 
time in connection with tinned brass cases 
charged with powder and ball;" and added 
that "some had been brought to his attention 
that had been stored at the National Armory 
for about 25 years and the cartridges were 
in apparently as good condition as when 
first stored away." These Morse car- 
tridges are thus officially certified to as hav- 
ing been made in i86i-'2 in the United States. 
Gen. Benet knew that Geo. W. Morse was 
the original inventor of the primed, expan- 
sive, metallic-cartridge system of breech- 
loading fire-arms, patented Oct. 28, 1856; 
of long practical experience, and that his in- 
ventions were valuable to the military ser- 
vice. He, therefore, encouraged and aided 
him for many years; but just as in 1879, when 
company commanders diversely reported 
on the Winchester cartridge, also as when, 
in i867-'8, differing opinions were held by 
the troops regarding the relative merits ol 
the Spencer and Remington rifle systems; 
company commanders could not agree, and 
the Morse movable base cartridge was 
abandoned. Mr. Morse died a few years 
ago, and his last patented cartridge is now 
forgotten. 

Morse published a pamphlet in 1886 re- 
garding his movable base cartridge with re- 
sizing and reloading tools. In it he says : 
"The Morse system embraces all firearms 
which use the modern metallic cartridge- 
case as an obturator or gas check, by what- 
ever name such guns are known infantry 
arms, repeating or magazine guns, and ma- 
chine guns. All are based upon the same 
principles which were first set forth in 
Morse's patents, Nos. 15,995 and [5,996, da- 
ted October 28, 1856. 

The first cartridge cases were made oi lead 
and its alloys. (See Morse's models, patent 
above mentioned.) Some of these cases wen- 
riveted to solid iron heads, like the Hotchkiss 
cartridge; others had heads fastened to the 
case with an eyelet, like the Boxer cartridge; 



138 



RECREATION. 



while others were made of continuous metal, 
like the U. S. Frankford Arsenal cartridge. 
This metal was admirably adapted to this 
use, being ductile. * * * * It was soon 
found that very thin brass or copper, drawn 
up like thimbles, would answer the same 
purpose as the lead, and better protect the 
charge from rough handling, and also that 
the objection to the use of a special primer 
required for Morse's first cartridge must, if 
possible, be removed. 

This caused the invention of Morse's cart- 
ridges, tried at West Point, N. Y., in 1857 

ttJCcntzeL -Z8BG. 








and 1858. Both of these cartridges were pro- 
vided with movable bases. Morse's cart- 
ridges, patented in 1858, answered all the 
purposes of the large-bored guns then in use, 
but when he tried them lately (before mak- 
ing his present invention), for the long range 
small-bored guns, they failed. 

That was the primary cause of his inven- 
tion patented in 1886 

When the Government again took up this 
system in 1866, a rim-fire, folded head cart- 
ridge was adopted for trial. Under the pres- 
sure of a service charge, the thin cartridge 
heads ruptured and failed. 

This caused the adoption of the solid head 
Frankford Arsenal service cartridge which 
is substantially Morse's cartridge (patent No. 



15,996, Oct. 28, 1856, figure 4), reduced one- 
third in diameter and double in length, using 
mostly twice as much powder. 

Considerable ingenuity is displayed in 
Appendix 13, report of Commandant of 
Frankford Arsenal, published on page 112, 
report of the Chief of Ordnance, 1882, in en- 
deavoring to account for the cause of the 
rupture of the service cartridge in the cham- 
bers of the rifle. 

Why does not the same cause rupture 
Morse's shell ? Out of many thousands of 
trials, not a single rupture of the case has 
occurred. At one single trial to test the rel- 
ative value of copper and brass, ten of 
Morse's cartridges were fired some 200 
rounds each and the cases did not fail in a 
single instance 

The new Morse cartridge is a thin-cased 
one, has a movable base and a rubber thim- 
ble ; it is practically indestructible. The 
1886 cartridge like those patented by Geo. 
W. Morse in 1858 — the first metallic cart- 
ridges ever made at the Frankford Arsenal 
— see Ordnance memoranda, No. 14, 1873, 
plate 1 — is open at both ends and may be 
drawn in tubes of any length which economy 
of manufacture may dictate, and made only 
thick enough to protect the charge from 
rough handling, moisture, etc. Its rear end 
is closed bv a flanged-headed reinforce cup 
carrying a priming packet. This cup enters 
only a short distance into the case, say from 
10 to 25 hundredths of an inch, having its 
front edge as near to a knife-edge as may be 
consistent to manufacture. 

On June 8, 1858, the Washington, D. C.» 
Union, published a letter from George W. 
Morse, replying to the attacks made by the 
press on breech-loading fire-arms, in which 
he said : 

" The opposition to breech-loading is short- 
lived ; the day is near at hand when ramrods 
will be as obsolete as matchlocks." 

The prediction was verified. Breech-load- 
ing fire-arms had been known for centuries. 
The first fire-arms ever made were breech- 
loading. That is to say, the charge was in- 
serted into the rear end of an open-ended 
tube, which was closed by such means as 
could then be applied. As an improvement 
upon this original system, the muzzle-loader 
was produced. That is to say, a tube was 
permanently plugged or closed at one end, 
and the charge was inserted from the muzzle 
end thereof. 

This was done because of the supposed 
impracticability of making a gas-tight joint 
between the rear open end of the tube and 
the breech-closing device. 

The United States Ordnance memoranda, 
No. 8, 1870, page 7, says : 

"The successful invention of the self- 
primed metallic-case cartridge has greatly 
simplified the construction of breech- 
loading fire-arms. Prior to its introduction 
and use, the prevention of the escape of 
flame through the breech-joint was of diffi- 
cult, if not impossible, achievement, and 
complicated arrangements of breech me- 
chanism had to be resorted to, with, at best, 



THE GENESIS OF THE METALLIC CARTRIDGES. 



139 



Iticrjjuiruj fromModet X/t V.SJ'cUcnJ. 'Office 

GWTtforse 

Cartrvdqe 

.Patented. Ocl^SJSSb 

JTiy J. ^Fupl. 




cart- 



unsatisfactory results. The metallic 
ridge overcomes this difficulty. * * 
So important an element is it that it may be 
said that with a perfect cartridge the most 
indifferent breech arrangements can be used 
with safety and efficiency." 

Under Act of Congress, June 12, 1858, and 
Ordnance Board, August 3, 1858, Geo. W. 
Morse licensed the Government to alter 
2,000 muskets or rifles and 1,000 carbines ac- 
cording to a pattern furnished by him to the 
Government. This license included all of 
his patent privileges. 

Mr. Morse subsequently accepted an ap- 
pointment from Bishop Polk in the Tennessee 
State Armory ; his step-son, formerly a cadet 
in the U. S. Military Academy, West Point, 
N. Y., entered the military service of the so- 
called Southern Confederacy and was ap- 
pointed Aide-de-Camp to General Polk 
during the period of our civil war. 

In 1870, Morse was refused an extension of 
his patent of 1856, by Mr. Duncan, Acting 
Patent Commissioner. Between September 
13, 1858, and February 11, i860, the U. S. Ord- 
nance Department paid him $18,000 for his 
royalties and patents. On November 9, 1873, 
the Examiner-in-Chief, U. S. Patent Office, 
recommended a refusal of his application for 
an extension. Report No. 1, House of Rep- 
resentatives, 45th Congress, 3d Sessiou, De- 
cember 5, 1878, is a report from Mr. Pollard 
from the Committee on Patents recommend- 
ing the passage of House Bill No. 5,332 based 
on the memorial of George W. Morse, origi- 
nal inventor of the modern metallic-cart- 
ridge breech-loading system of fire-arms and 



ammunition adapted to their use. It was 
partly based on the testimony of V. D Stock - 
bridge. On March 1, 1879, » n the U. S. Sen- 
ate, Mr. Wadleigh, from the Committee on 
Patents, reported adversely on bill 1,434 to 
pay Morse $25,000. with a contingent in- 
fringement suit for $891,000. 

In George W. Morse's patent No. 15,996, 
dated October 28, 1856, Washington, 1"). C, 
I find the following : — " When the gun is 
fired, the back part T (back end of the 
cartridge case) swells out and seals the 
breech joint ; the part 'b,' the head, resists 
the hammer blow ; the disk ' c ' or ' k ' (per- 
cussion primer), together with the after 
part of the cartridge case, is driven back 
against the breech-piece, and being broader 
than the percussion pin, or the aperture for 
the passage of the pin through the sliding 
breech-piece, seals around it, so that the 
more forcibly the cartridge recoils, the more 
securely is the vent sealed. 

"Finally, the part 'b' (cartridge head), 
remains unchanged and allows the cartridge 
case to be automatically withdrawn from the 
gun. If a primer fails to fire, another can 
readily replace the one failing." 

The Frankford Arsenal service cartridge 
case and all others made since October 28, 
1856, no matter how primed, have operated 
in the gun substantially as above mentioned 
by Mr. Morse, whether it be in a machine 
gun, magazine, or repeating fire-arm, or a 
military rifle. 

This invention of Morse's is the basis of his 
claim to the paternity of the primed metallic 
cartridge system of breech-loading fire-arms. 
It was used by Major W. H. Bell.Ord. Dept., 
U. S. A., at the Washington Arsenal in 
March, 1857. The Morse metallic cartridge 
was then a short cartridge case suitable for 
the large calibre military guns then in use. 

In 1855, Morse filed in the United States 
Patent Office papers descriptive of a tube to 
resize the cartridge cases after Bring. I >n 
June 9, 1885, Morse addressed a communi- 
cation to the Chief of Ordnance, I . S. A., 
describing his inventions and his claims. 

Some of Morse's metallic cartridj 
loaded in i860 at the National Armory al 
Springfield, Mass., having their rear ends 
closed by perforated rubber wads M< 
patent No. 20, 727, dated June 23, 1858- were 
fired in i885-'6 and proved to be in as good 
condition as when first stored away. In the 
language of the inventor: "No limit of the 
life of a main shell of the cartridge has \< • 
been found." 

George W. Morse was a native of Ma 
chusetts. He married and settled in Louisi- 
ana long before the war of 1861. In [856 
and 1858 he procured patents in the United 
States for improvements in breech-load- 
ing fire-arms and cartridges. John B. Floyd, 
then Secretary of War, interested himself in 
his behalf, and in 1858 a bill was passed by 
Congress appropriating $25,000 to provide 
for the manufacture of arms under said pat- 
ents. Of that sum $m,ooo was paid to Morse 
for the right to manufacture a certain num- 



140 



RECREATION. 



ber of arms, and machinery for their manu- 
facture was set up at Harper's Ferry, Va. 
When the civil war began Morse employed 
that machinery in the interests of the Con- 
federates. Adhering to the Confederacy, 
he registered and patented his inventions at 
Richmond. 

MONGOLIAN PHEASANTS. 

London, Ont. 
Editor Recreation. 

I can sympathize with your Tacoma friends 
in their attempts to raise Mongolian pheas- 
ants. I was there some years ago, and found 
them the hardest birds to raise I had ever 
seen or heard of. My first year I only raised 
four; the next, 10; third year, 40 out of 45 
eggs, except one or two that met with acci- 
dents, and now I can safely count on raising 
90 per cent, of all that hatch out. 

Mr. Eberts must have had daisies to lay, 
if three hens laid 300 eggs. He ought to keep 
that strain, as I think from 50 to 60 eggs is 
the most I ever heard of being laid by one 
hen. But then the air of Washington may 
be good for large strings of eggs, and such. 
Mr. T. Ailing has a herd of pheasants I 
should like much to see, or to have some of 
them, i. e., the copper kind. I have heard of 
many, and know there are many, but copper 
ones beat the books. Could he-send us a few 
copper feathers ? 

I would suggest to any breeder of pheas- 
ants to send to Upcatt Gile, Strand, London, 
England, for a book entitled, " Pheasants for 
Amateurs," by Horn, and he will find the 
best of instruction. Meantime, I will tell your 
readers of my method. 

Always choose light-weight, quiet hens for 
mothers. The eggs should be hatched in a 
box at least six inches high all around, so that 
the young birds cannot get away from the 
mother, as they will get up and run as soon 
as they are out of the shell, and if there is 
any place as 'big as a mousehole that they 
can get into they will hide. If they get cold 
they die. I leave thern in this nest for 24 
hours, then I place them -with the hen in a 
coop, about three feet by two feet, with one 
side wire netting, one-half inch mesh. Then 
they have no chance to stray away from the 
nest or their mother. I feed the hen with 
plenty of corn, and give the young birds 
some custard, which I make in the following 
way : Say for 12 chicks, take 2 eggs and 2 
tablespoonfuls of milk ; bring the milk to a 
boiling point ; then add the eggs, well beaten 
up, and boil till the whole is quite dry. Be 
careful not to allow it to burn. When this is 
cool, I give about a teaspoonful at a time till 
the young birds begin to know the call of the 
mother ; for if you give more, the old hen, 
when no attention is paid to her call, will eat 
the food herself. By giving a small quantity 
every hour or so, for the first two days, the 
little fellows will begin to feed. I also place 
in the coop a short clover sod, which they 
will pick over. I feed in this way for two or 
three days ; then add a little of Spratt's 
game meal, with fine chopped lettuce, and 



so on — more meal and less custard. 

I give seeds, as crushed hemp, millet, 
canary seed, wheat about the second week, 
and gradually leave off the soft feed, except 
that two or three times a week I give the 
Spratt's meal and cristle. Till they are four 
or five weeks old, after the first week, I give 
some of Spratt's cristle, or, if not that, I cul- 
tivate maggots from beef-heads, etc., which I 
keep in bran for 24 hours before feeding. 
Be careful and not give too many, as they 
may scare the young birds. As soon as the 
chicks know the mother's call, I take them 
out of the coop and place them in a small 
open pen, on a freshly cut grass plot. This 
pen is made about two feet by three feet, 
with ten-inch band for three sides, the top of 
half-inch mesh wire netting. The open 
end fits on a small covered box, where they 
can be closed up at night or in wet weather. 
It is necessary that till the birds are four 
weeks old they shall not be exposed to rain 
or damp. After being in this enclosure a 
day or two, I draw the box back about 1 % 
inches, so that the young birds may get out ; 
but the hen is kept shut up. They can then 
get on the grass and pick up flies and insects, 
of which they are very fond. 

When about two months old it w ; ll be 
necessary to either put. the birds in large 
pens or cut their wings, for they will want, as 
soon as evening comes, to fly up to roost in 
trees, where they are in danger from cats. 
Always close up pheasants about 5 P. m., or 
they will take to trees or roofs of houses for 
roosting-places. 

I would advise placing the young birds 
with the mother in the coverts when about 
six weeks old, as they will stay with the hen 
and it will be possible to feed them all the 
season till they are strong enough to* take 
care of themselves. 

The English authorities are divided on the 
subject of watering the young birds. Some 
say, "give;" and some, "don't give." I 
have tried both plans and have been success- 
ful, so I think it is much more humane to 
give them the water, which I do in shallow 
dishes with small screens over them to keep 
the birds from getting wet. If there was 
nothing in the dish but water, the little things 
would sit down in it and get chilled. 

Dr. J. S. Niven. 



Mr. S. L. Crosby, taxidermist, Bangor, 
Me., gives the following instructions for 
skinning and cleaning big game heads: 

Start at the back of the neck and. keeping the point 
of the knife under the skin, edge up, divide it in a cir- 
cle all around the neck, being careful to keep well 
down to where the neck joins the shoulders. 

Never split the skin on the under side. Open it on 
a straight line along the back of the neck to a point 
between the ears. Then make a V-bhaped cut to the 
base of each antler. Cut off the ears close to the head 
and pry the skin away from the base of each antler. 
Skin down on each side and over the forehead until 
you reach the eye. Be careful in skinning the eye 
not to cut the lid, and be sure to get to the bottom 
of the eye-pit and sever the skin from the bone. 
Continue on down over the nose and detach the 
skin from it. Now pare off all the flesh you can 
from the base of the ears and end of the nose, and 
your skin is ready for a liberal dose of fine salt; 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



141 



when it absorbs it put on more and let it dry in the 
shade, or, better still, smoke it a little. Never stretch 
the skin out and tack it, nor hang it up by the nose. 
Now your skin is taken care of, clean all the meat 
off the skull, dig out the brains, and be sure to clean 
and save the under jaw, as it is necessary in mount- 
ing the head. When it is possible to get yovir heads 
out without skinning, I prefer to have them that 
way ; but by following these instructions I can 
guarantee you a fine iob. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 

Fort Resolution, Great Slave Lake, 

April 29th, 1895. 
Editor Recreation. 

Yours of the 25th Sept. last, reached me on 
the 1 2th of March; so you see I am far away 
from the post-office— 850 miles. I cannot go 
every morning before breakfast and get my 
mail, as you do. This letter of yours came all 
this distance by dog-sledge, with the Hudson 
Bay Company's packet, which weighs some- 
times 400 pounds to start with, dogs and men 
being changed at every fort. It is carried in 
this manner away up to the Arctic ocean 
down the great Mackenzie river, over 1,900, 
miles. I should like to write you often but 
it is rather difficult at present for this 
reason. As soon as this lake opens out so 
that I can navigate, I must cross and go 
down the Mackenzie river to look after some 
mines, cross over the Rocky Mountains in 
the arctic circle, some time in July, and go 
down in the great Yukon valley mining- 
district where I have been once before. 

I have had wide experience on the frontier 
and in the West. I started out from New 
York State, my home, when but a small 
boy, 20 years ago last summer. Hunted the 
buffalo on the plains in early days, had 
plenty of trouble with the Indians, and am 
still on the frontier. Have been over here 
three years collecting specimens. That is 
how I came to get the wood buffalo I sent 
home last summer. Have also hunted and 
trapped lots of fine furs. I sold them at 
Edmonton, Alberta. I traveled nine months, 
on snow-shoes, to kill my wood buffalo. They 
are very wild and scarce. I started from 
Chipewyan the 27th of July, 1893, went up 
Peace river about 70 miles with my boat, 
loaded with a two years' supply of provisions. 
I built my cabin on the banks of the Peace 
river, which flows down toward the Arctic. 
This is the southern limit of the wood buffalo. 
Their range is from here north to Great 
Slave lake, about 200 by 300 miles in area, 
and the country is very swampy. You can- 
not travel over it in summer. The buffalo 
are hunted only in winter, on snow shoes. 
They live in brushy and marshy places. In 
winter they feed on the tall grass that lies un- 
der three to four feet of snow. They root or 
nose about in the deep snow and keep fat 
all winter. The one I got was an old bull 
and a very large one, 10 feet long and 8 feet 
around the brisket. There were seven in 
the herd and all ran in different directions 
when the first shot was fired, throwing the 
snow so thick around them that it was hard 
to see them. 



If I don't lose your address I may write 
again when I am settled in the Yukon coun- 
try. I have 1,700 miles to go next summer 
all alone in a small boat, and a goo 1 many 
rapids to run. Am not living at Fore Chip- 
pewyan this winter. Have moved to a point 
312 miles north from there. 

John C. Hatch. 

Ten Sleep, Wyo. 

Editor Recreation. 

Your attack on the skin-hunters of Wy- 
oming meets approval in all quarters, but 
conversant as you are with the mountains in 
this State, you must understand how utterly 
impracticable it is to protect game with 
anything less than a small army. I believe 
that the only way to preserve the game, here 
or elsewhere, is to make every settler or 
resident land-owner personally interested 111 
the work. 

As the laws stand at present, the majority 
of ranchmen feel that they are aimed at 
them, for the benefit of the rich city sports- 
men. 

When you say to a ranchman, "You can't 
eat game, except in season," you make him 
a poacher, because he is neither going hun- 
gry himself nor have his family do so. No 
one appreciates better than he the benefits 
that accrue from well-stocked streams and 
forests ; but the bulk of all game is in 
new countries being settled by men who 
have been pioneering all their lives. Most 
of them are poor — none rich, and the im- 
portance of wild meat, to help out their mea- 
ger larder, cuts no small figure in inducing 
them to the frontier. 

I am personally acquainted with more 
than one family who would almost starve 
but for the game. I heard one remark a few 
days ago : 

"I hate to kill a doe, now, but a fellow 
can't see his children hungry and I can't find 
a buck." 

If laws are made prohibiting such people 
from killing for the table they at once be- 
come enemies to that law ; whereas, if they 
were allowed to kill for their necessities they 
would value the game enough to preserve 
and spare all the females possible. Laws 
are useless unless enforced, and no one but 
actual settlers can enforce them. They will 
not do so, as long as the laws injure them. 

I know a family that has consumed eight 
deer in eight weeks. Seven of those eight 
were does, and each would have had two 
kids. Put that family down for 22 deer in 
eight weeks and then ask where the game is 
going ? 

It was a case of sheer necessity that com- 
pelled the man to kill the game ; but,do 
suppose that after having to break a law he 
is going to prevent someone else from doing 
the same, even if the other fellow t.ike^ only 
the hide? No, sir; and until the law allows 
settlers to supply their own tables you n< 
can enforce it in a country so vast, ru 
and wild as the mountains of Wyoming. 

A. XlMKUli. 



142 



RECREATION. 



New Whatcom, Wash. 
Editor Recreation. 

I have, since June gth last, made two trips 
to the Slate Creek Mining District, 125 
miles from here, 118 of which I made on 
foot. I am interested in some mining prop- 
erty up there, which accounts for these long 
tramps. Our camp was within one-half mile 
of the summit of Crater Mountain, just over 
the divide from the Methow District. The 
day after my departure for home, two of the 
boys started out, on a prospecting trip and 
took a rifle along, thinking they might see a 
bear. The first night they camped in a pretty 
basin at the foot of Crater Mountain and 
three miles from our camp. They had just 
finished dinner and were smoking, when, on 
looking across the creek, they saw two cinna- 
mon bears about 75 yards distant and en- 
tirely unconscious of the presence of the 
camp. Mr. McKay, who had the rifle (a 38- 
55 Winchester), killed them both with three 
shots. While they were skinning these a 
black bear came sauntering along and Mc- 
Kay added him to his bag, making three in 
five minutes. 

The two cinnamons weighed about 400 
pounds each, while the black weighed about 
350 pounds. I saw the hides 10 days later, 
and they were all in good condition. One of 
the other boys was out a few days before 
this and ran up to within 50 feet of a mon- 
ster silver tip, but unfortunately had left 
his rifle in camp. The bear's tracks, as well 
as those of several others, were seen later, in 
that locality, but their hides being poor, it 
would have been useless to kill them, except 
for meat, and they had plenty in camp. 
Goats are plentiful on that range, as well 
as mule deer. J. S. Stangroom. 

Seattle, Washington, July 20, 1895. 

Editor Recreation. 

The season in this State opens on the first 
day of August, and sportsmen are anticipat- 
ing large bags of game in consequence of 
the exceptionally early and dry spring on 
Puget Sound this year. Late spring rains 
have been a destructive feature in feathered 
game preservation here for several succes- 
sive seasons. 

Two members of that fraternity known as 
"market-hunters" were dealt summary jus- 
tice last week in this city for marketing 
young mallard ducks and grouse out of sea- 
son. 

Two restaurant-proprietors to whom they 
sold their bags were also arraigned. Each 
plead guilty and was fined $10 and costs. 

This is the first conviction obtained in the 
courts here within the recollection of sports- 
men. May others follow. 

Local sportsmen are agitating the advisa- 
bility of organizing a " State Game Associa- 
tion," having for its primary object the de- 
tection and prosecution of such offenders as 
the above. A meeting has been called to 
take initiatory steps. 

Local dog-fanciers are exceedingly desir- 



ous of revivifying the Seattle Kennel Club, 
and if persistence and organized effort will 
accomplish it, the> purpose to hold a show 
next year. An effectual barrier for the past 
two years has been inability to raise the 
necessary $500 in cash premiums exacted by 
the American Kennel Club, of which this 
club is a member. 

Recreation is filling "a long felt want" 
in this locality. 

C. B, Yandell. 



Since I last wrote you a rich gold field has 
been opened to the world at the head of the 
Methow and " times " are very lively. I 
suppose 500 men are in there by this time. 
It is good for business, but the game will be 
driven farther back. Still, I think it might 
repay you to try your luck in the land north 
of the "strike." Guy Waring. 



Several bunches of elk have been seen 
lately; sage chickens are almost full grown 
and are plentiful. People on the mountains 
report deer everywhere. 

James Fullerton, Ten Sleep, Wyo. 



A swan with four claws on each foot was 
killed at Clark's Fork, Idaho, on the Pend 
d'Oreille river, and was mounted by J. W. 
Withers of Spokane. It was a male bird, 
weighed 26 lbs. and had a spread of 7 ft. 
4 in. 

You can not make any mistake as to snipe 
now. They are here. One thousand weak- 
fish were caught by my guests last Sunday. 
M. S. Hungerford, Lanoka, 
Ocean Co., N. J. 



Valentine, Neb., is in the midst of one of 
the finest hunting and fishing regions in the 
West. Small game abound in the sand hills 
and trout fishing is good. 

James McKenna, Ruthven, Iowa. 



Sportsmen who have visited the Massa- 
chusetts coast in quest of shore birds do not 
make flattering reports. A few good bags 
have been made, but all agree that thus lar 
the flight is small. 

From Glendon and Iowa Falls, la., come 
reports that hundreds of young prairie 
chickens are being killed in open violation 
of law. It is rather late in the day for such 
work to be permitted in any thickly-settled 
country. 

E. L. Dolittle, of Menominee, Wis., has 
been appointed a game warden for his dis- 
trict. He is said to be an ardent sportsman, 
which of course means that he is in favor of 
a strict enforcement of the game laws. 



CANADIAN NOTES. 



143 



An interesting collection of photographs 
was exhibited, the latter part of the month, by 
the members of the Montreal Camera Club, 
in the rooms of the Natural History Society, 
by the aid of a large and powerful stereopti- 
con operated by Mr. H.G. Beaman. Eighty- 
five views, all purely the work of amateur 
members of the Society, were thrown on the 
sheet. The work shown was of a superior 
order, and excellent taste was displayed in 
the choice of subjects. 

The object of the Camera Club is to en- 
courage amateurs and foster a healthy love 
for the beautiful in nature. The Montreal 
branch co-operates with others at St. John, 
N. B., Hamilton and Toronto, with whom 
slides and photographs are exchanged. Dur- 
ing the winter instruction is given to the 
younger members by their more experienced 
brethren. 

I have just received the report of the Mon- 
treal Swimming Club, which shows it 
to be in splendid condition both financially 
and numerically. There are 1,015 members, 
numbering 573 seniors and 442 juniors. There 
is no pleasanter place to spend a day than on 
the club grounds. The precautions taken 
render the place perfectly safe — the swim- 
ming master being constantly in attendance, 
and there is a large stretch of beach and 
shallow water for those unable to swim. 



Cricket in Canada is making rapid strides 
in public favor, and some interesting games 
have been played, both in Toronto and Mon- 
treal. A London correspondent sends me the 
following, which I am sure my friends will 
read with pleasure : — The Prince of Wales 
has sent a letter of congratulation to Dr. W. 
Grace, the famous veteran cricket player, 
upon his scoring a record of a thousand runs 
in the first month of the cricket season. On 
May 17th Dr. Grace scored 288 runs against 
the Somersetshire eleven, that being the one 
hundredth occasion upon which he had run 
a century or over. The attention given to 
this fact in leading articles in the Times and 
other London newspapers is a striking evi- 
dence of the powerful hold upon the public 
mind in England which the national game 
maintains. Although 47 years old, and 
with a record of a leading place among 
amateur cricketers in England for many 
years past, Dr. Grace seems in the very hey- 
day of his powers and his wicket is considered, 
rather more invulnerable than it was 20 
years ago. 

The most important event in Canadian 
sporting circles, during the present season, 
was the holding of the first bench show of 
the Montreal Kennel Association, in Mon- 
treal. The show proved most successful, 
financially and otherwise. Considering that 
the Association had only been at work three 
weeks preparing, the arrangements were most 
perfect. The entries numbered 377. The 



prizes given amounted to $300 and $300 in 
kind. In September next it is proposed to 
hold another show, on a much more extended 
scale, at which $6,000 worth of prizes will 
be given. 

Nearly 3,000 people paid for admission. 
Dr. Wesley Mills headed the list of prize- 
winners, with 12 dogs and 15 entries. He cap- 
tured 12 prizes. Mr. Geo. Lanigan's fox 
terrier, Belvoir Jim, deserves special men- 
tion. He is only nine months old and suc- 
ceeded in winnirig 3 prizes, and would have 
taken a fourth had he not been bitten by 
another dog. His grand sire, " Dusky Trap," 
is probably the most valuable fox terrier in 
America. He is the champion ot his class 
and is valued at $20,000. 

The Toronto Board of Police Commission- 
ers has decided to put into force the regula- 
tions of the City Council relating to "bicycle 
scorching." Special constables, attired in civ- 
ilian clothes and mounted on wheels, will be 
placed at stated points, with instructions to 
overhaul all wheelmen whose speed exceeds 
the limit laid down in the by-laws. It is also 
determined, as soon as suitable arrangements 
can be made, to purchase a boat to patrol the 
bay, with the object of enforcing the laws 
relating to shooting, bathing and fishing. 

Mr. T. Jackson has sold his twenty-oue 
foot sloop yacht, Soubrette, and has ordered 
a new eighteen footer from A. G. Cuthbert, 
of Toronto. She will be a pure type of the 
skimming dish with mainsail and jib. Mr. 
Cuthbert has one of his boats on our lake 
now, the Folly, owned by Mr. Abbott. She 
is a very fast boat, having won every race 
she entered last season; and as Cuthbert is 
considered the best and most modern de- 
signer in Canada, we may expect to see 
something very fast in his latest productions. 
The commodore of the Royal St. Lawrence 
Yacht Club, Geo. W. Hamilton, Esq., has 
presented that club with a handsome 
challenge cup to be raced for by the yachts 
in the A 30 and 25-foot classes. 



Mr. Louis Rubenstein, Capt. Loze and a 
number of friends have returned from a fish- 
ing trip in the St. Agathe region. They 
caught lots of fish, but some of the party 
were most cruelly treated by the black flies 
and mosquitoes. Some were entirely un- 
recognizable and had to call in the surgeon's 
aid to regain the use of their eyes. Fishing is 
now in full sway in the St. Lawrence, and 
some fine catches have already been made. 



Messrs. Coll and Dumas (of the Grand 
Trunk Boating Club) intend again taking 
a boating trip on the St. Lawrence. It will 
be remembered they went as far as New 
York last summer, and an account was pub- 
lished of their adventures in several papers. 
I have secured the sole right to publish an 
account of their ne\t trip in RECREATION. 



144 



RECREATION. 



Water Polo has been taking quite a promi- 
nent position during the past two months in 
Canada, especially in the city of Montreal. 
The M. A. A. A has one of the best teams 
this year that ever played for the winged 
wheel. Barry and Laverty claim that the 
Laurentians will make a big bid for the first 
place. The Montreal Swimming Club team 
will be stronger this year than last, and any 
team that beats them will know they have 
been playing polo. The Grand Trunks 
(champions 1894-1895) wi-11 have almost a 
new team this year. Davis,who played cen- 
tre, and Bob Wall will not play. However, 
the Club has a great lot of colts, and with 
good coaching, the team ought to be near 
the front when the bell rings. 



Argonauts, was defeated by Blackstaff, by 
three lengths. He won the third and fourth 
heats. 



The executive committee of the Canadian 
Kennel Club met during the past month, when 
it was decided to leave over until next year the 
consideration of the clipping system. The 
Toronto show dates were accepted, namely 
the week commencing Sept. 19th; the second 
of the Industrial exhibition. It was also de- 
cided not to accept the proposition of the 
American Kennel Club for mutual recogni- 
tion of suspensions and disqualifications. All 
wins at shows held under the rules of the 
Canadian Kennel Club, or American Kennel 
Club, up to December 31st, 1895, will be 
recognized. 

Bicyclists are kicking in Toronto at a per- 
capita tax, and declare for resistance until 
they get something to be taxed for more than 
the ordinary person who uses the pavements. 
A certain modest proportion of them say they 
will consent to enrich the civic chest only 
when the boulevards are turned into bicycle 
paths. A Montrealer in town this week was 
amazed at the extent of the fad for wheels, 
and declares there were 20 in Toronto for 
one in Hochelaga's big suburb. 



The many friends of Mr. Henry P. Mc- 
Donald, and especially^the members of the 
Montreal Pastime Athletic Club, which club 
he has so successfully represented at the va- 
rious athletic meetings at which he was a 
competitor, will regret to learn that he will, 
for a time at least, be unable to continue his 
athletic career, which at one time promised 
so well ; his physician having prohibited his 
doing so as his lungs have been affected. 



Mr. Andrew Donaldson, the popular ex- 
president of the Argyle Snowshoe Club, Mon- 
treal, who only lately removed to the city of 
Buffalo, returned to Montreal a few days ago 
for the purpose of joining the Benedicts. 
Recreation wishes you a long life and a 
happy one, Mr. Donaldson. 

I am sorry to see that in the final heat for 
the Senior sculls at the Moleseye Regatta, 
England, E. A. Thompson, of the Toronto 



There is a change in the Canadian part- 
ridge season this year, which now opens on 
the 15th of September. No other changes 
have been made in the shooting laws, all 
previous statements to the contrary notwith- 
standing. 

McCracken, the Cobourg player, who 
played with Lawrence till the disbandment 
of the New England Association, and who 
subsequently played with the Augusta team, 
has been relieved for poor batting. 



F. Barnes, of London, Ont., was suspended 
until August 24th tor taking his hands off 
the handles while finishing a race at Gait on 
July 24th. 



In the new Berlin (Ont.) park there is a 
tree with two trunks branching out four feet 
from the ground, one being an elm, the other 
an oak. 



The Bell-Air Jockey Club has selected 
Thursday and Saturday, Sept. 12 and 14, as 
the dates for its fall meeting. 



The Brantford Athletic Club, organized 
three years ago, has disbanded, but it is said 
will shortly reorganize. 

A big beaver dam has been discovered on 
the line of the projected Hudson Bay road, 
north of Gladstone. 

Jack Player, of London, and H. E. Davis, 
of Dundas, have signed with the Hamilton 
Baseball Club. 

C. S. Whiting. 



I have just returned from a trip for snipe 
and bluefish, to Chatham Beach, Cape Cod. 

We had fair luck with the bluefish, which 
ran big, and for fighting they were not be- 
hind the average, as still sore hands will tes- 
tify. By the way, one needs to take there 
some strips of thin sheet rubber packing 
about 2 inches wide, for tips. These beat the 
ordinary store finger-stall all to pieces. We 
also had good sport with the bay-birds, mostly 
yellow-legs, willett, dowitchand creaker, and 
by the first or middle of September the 
flight of black-breasted plover, or bull-heads, 
as they call them there, is on. N. E. Gould, 
there, will take good care of any one, or cor- 
respond. Ox Eye, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Have received the Forehand hammerless shotgun 
which you sent me as a premium for 35 subscribers, 
and consider it a valuable and handsome gift from 
you, as $5 would cover all my expenses in getting the 
subscriptions. Barclay Smith, Van Buren, Ark. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



145 



All readers who have ever studied the 
character of the North American Indian, 
and who know his cunning, his craftiness, 
his passion for gambling, and his fondness 
for cheating, will enjoy Capt. F. M. Ber- 
nard's story of " An Indian Horse Race," to 
be printed in the October number of Rec- 
reation. Those who love the October 
brown of the Minnesota prairies, the whistle 
of the canvasback's wing, or the roar of a 
rising covey of grouse, will revel in James 
K. Boyd's narrative of " Shooting in the 
Northwest." Those who lean to the pursuit 
of the larger game and to the adventures 
incident thereto will read, with deep inter- 
est, Lieut. Abercrombie's thrilling account 
of "A Deer Drive with Spokane Indians." 
Mrs. Frances Webster tells of "A Trapped 
Sensation" in a way that will delight all 
who love the strange, the unnatural, the 
sensational. Ed. H. Trafton, an old Rocky 
Mountain hunter and guide, tells a weird 
story of elk-hunting which he designates 
as "A Mystery of the Tetons." Anglers 
will be delighted with F. K. Root's "Outing 
on the Peshtigo," and the poetry of the 
chase is beautifully represented in Capt. 
Jack Crawford's "Old Kentucky Rifle," and 
in Dr. L. E. Holmes' "Sportsman's Song." 

Five of these stories will be richly illus- 
trated, and the reader will learn from the 
different departments where to go for all 
kinds of fish and game, how to make photo- 
graphs, how to get the greatest satisfac- 
tion from his wheel, and many other inter- 
esting things. Altogether, the October num- 
ber of Recreation will be a notable one. 



The annual meeting of the Vermont Fish 
and Game League was held at Isle La 
Motte, in Lake Champlain, August 1, and 
the large attendance showed the deep inter- 
est felt by Vermont sportsmen in the subject 
of fish and game protection. Over 250 
sportsmen were present, among whom were: 
Governor Woodbury, Senator Proctor, Gen. 
J. G. McCullough, Hon. G. G. Benedict, 
Col. H. W. Allen, Col. H. W. Hall, Gen. T. 
S. Peck, Ex-Governor J. W. Stewart, Gen. 
J. J. Estey, Col. R. J. Coffey, Col. E. R. 
Morse, Capt. H. R. Tutherly, E. C. 
Smith, Ex-Lieut. -Governor F. S. Stranahan, 
Col. L. F. Abbott, Gen. W. W. Henry, Hon. 
M. F. Allen, Hon. H. W. Vail, Col. E. D. 
Bennett, Dr. H. C. Petty, Hon. N. W. Fisk, 
Ex-Senator Edmunds, Congressman Pow- 
ers, Governor Mansur, Ex-Governor Bar- 
stow, Congressman Grout, C. H. Vander- 
bilt, Hon. H. G. Root, Rev. W. F. Weeks, 
Dr. E. A. Smith, J. W. Titcomb, Dr. F. C. 
Kinney, Dr. C. W. Staples, Hon. H. W. 
Bailey, and Capt. S. E. Burnham. A dinner 
was served in a large tent, and some witty 
speeches were made. Vermont knows the 
value of her fish and game, and has more 
of them today than many a larger and young- 
er state. 

Mr. A. H. Overman, president of the Over- 
man Wheel Co., Chicopee Falls, Mass., is the 
proud owner of a beautiful new gun, It was 



made for him by F. Beesley, No. 2 St. James 
St., London, who was formerly master me- 
chanic for Purdys. This gun is a 12 guage, 
with 30 inch barrels, and weighs 6y 2 pounds. 
It is one of the most exquisite samples of 
the gun-maker's art I have ever seen. The 
fitting and finishing are such as might be seen 
on a piece of fine jewelry. The stock is a 
handsome piece of French walnut, and the 
engraving on the lock plates and frame is a 
dream. I did not inquire as to the price, 
and I think Mr. Overman would have been 
afraid to tell me if I had, lest his wife might 
read this paragraph. 

Mr. Beesley has lately made guns similai 
to this one for W. W. Astor, A. H. McCor 
mick, the millionaire reaper man, and for 
several other Americans. 



With this issue Recreation completes 
its first year, the initial number having been 
issued in October, '94. It started with or- 
ders for less than 1,000 copies, and now has 
an actual paid circulation of 12,000. The 
output has doubled in the last five months, 
and will double again in less than four 
months. The following letter from the 
American News Company is of interest in 
this connection : 

New York, July 30, 1895. 
Mr. G. O. Shields, 

Editor and Manager Recreation, New York. 

Dear Sir : When may we expect to receive the Au- 
gust number of Recreation, now past due? 

Permit us to remind you of the importance of ar- 
ranging for the prompt delivery here of our supply of 
this magazine each month. It seems to be steadily 
growing in public favor, as indicated by the fact 
that our standing orders call for nearly 5.000 copies 
a month, which is more than double the number dis- 
tributed by us last fall. 
Yours truly, 

The American News Company. 

This letter is reproduced in fac simile on 
page xxi of this issue. The manager of the 
American News Company is authorized to 
give full information, to anyone desiring it, 
as to the number of copies of Recreation 
bought and returned each month, and my 
subscription books are open to examination 
at all times. 

The American Canoe Association held 
its annual meet at Hotel Champlain, New- 
York, during the early part of August. 
The exercises consisted of racing, ball-play- 
ing, feasting, speechmaking and resting 
The attendance was about the same, numer- 
ically, as in former years. 



If you have received a sample c<>|>v of 
Recreation that you have not ordered, look 
it over carefully. It is sent by request "I 
some friend of yours who likes it, and who 
wants you to know of its good qualil 
Why not show your appreciation of In- cour- 
tesy by subscribing for the maga/ii 1 

Eli Whitney died at Sharon, Conn., Aug. 
17th, aged 74. He was a son of Eli Whitney, 
the inventor of the cotton rin, and was the 
inventor and maker of the famous Whitne) 
rifle. 



146 



RECREATION. 



Many amateur photographers make the 
mistake of buying and using inferior lenses, 
as a matter of economy. Almost every day 
photos are sent to me for publication 
which cannot be reproduced by the 
half tone process, because of being flat 
and weak. Many of these are well com- 
posed and are excellent subjects, and it is a 
matter of serious regret that they cannot be 
given to the public through Recreation. 
No matter how cheap a camera you may 
buy, or how much you must economize in 
other ways, let your lens be the best you can 
possibly afford. This is the basis of all suc- 
cess or failure in photography. You can 
not afford to buy a cheap lens, carry it per- 
haps hundreds, or even thousands of miles, 
make exposures on subjects which may 
never come within your reach again, and 
then have your pictures turn out flat. 

A photograph, in order to be fit for repro- 
duction by the half tone process, must 
be clear, sharp, of deep focus, and must 
have strong contrasts between the lights 
and shadows. These results cannot be ob- 
tained with a cheap lens. 



The Western Union Telegraph Company 
has mounted some of its messenger boys on 
bicycles. Each of the main offices in New 
York, from 14th to 125'th street, has been 
supplied with two messenger boys on wheels. 
These boys are said to be of a more intelli- 
gent class than the ones heretofore employed 
in the service. 

"This method of delivery has been ex- 
tremely successful in the uptown districts, 
where long runs are usual," said the mana- 
ger of one of the offices. " On short runs 
our bicyclists are impeded by getting on and 
off their wheels, and by being obliged to put 
them in a safe place while delivering mes- 
sages. But on longer runs the saving of 
time is considerable." 

This will surely improve the service, for a 
boy on a wheel must move faster than most 
of them do on foot, or he would fall off. 



POSSIBLE SMILES. 



About 500 subscriptions to Recrea- 
tion expire with this issue. I hope all 
these will be renewed, and not only this, but 
that each man so renewing will send in at 
least one subscription besides his own. 
There are many sportsmen who do not 
take Recreation and who would gladly 
subscribe for it if it were shown to them. I 
intend to enlarge the magazine rapidly, and 
to make it much better than it has ever been. 
Will you not help to make this possible ? 



I received the Forehand hammerless gun 
Saturday and it is a beauty. I am more 
than pleased with it, and feel well repaid for 
the trouble I took in getting the 35 subscrip- 
tions. S. Henry Steele, Haverhill, Mass. 

Bound volumes of Recreation, $2.50. 



THE MANUSCRIPT RETURNED. 

Poor little wanderer ! 

Fate was unkind to thee ! 
Patient hope's squanderer ! 

Fame has been blind to thee ! 
Back from rude editors, 

Lynx-eyed their scrutiny, 
All thy discreditors; 

Thine not to mutiny. 

Rest in obscurity, 

Till, in futurity, 
Laws may be passed 

Decreeing it jailable 

To write not available," 
" Genius " to blast. 

Then, with no stint o' space, 

Thou'lt, at a sprinter's pace, 

Come from the printer's case 
Published — at last ! 

E. C Walsh. 



That was a bright girl in the street-car the other 
day who said to her companion, who was making the 
usual female search for her purse : — " Let us divide 
this, Ethel. You fumble and I'll pay."— New York 
Herald. 



" Young man," the solemn stranger said, 

" What's going on inside?" 
" A baseball game — eight innings played," 

The budding sport replied. 
" Baseball upon the Sabbath day? 

O wicked, sinful land! 
Er — in the ninth now, did you say? 

Young man, how do they stand?" 

— Claremont National Eagle. 



Mr. Newlywed— What makes you smile so cynically 
this evening? 

Mrs. Newlywed — I was just thinking how you used 
to hold my hand, by the hour, before we were married. 
How stupid you were ! 

Stupid ! Not much. I held your dear little lily 
white paw to keep you from pounding the piano. 

Des Moines Leader. 



They sat in the twilight and talked of the past. 

"Hiram," she was saying, "just 20 years ago to- 
night I first became aware that you had kindled a 
flame in my heart." 

" Yes, Anastasia." 

"That, Hiram," she mused reflectively, "was about 
the last kindling I know of your having done." 



If you are not a millionaire, 
But wish to own a racing stud, 

Just let your collar button fall, 
And neath the bureau see it scud. 



" You are my deer," the young man wrote, 

" Whom soon I hope to see." 
Her answer was a curt, cool note: 

" You can't make game of me." 



Mr. Homeman— Did you read that article about a 
football player getting shot the other day ? 

Mrs. Homeman — No, John; goodness me, you don't 
mean to say the game has come to that ! 

— Boston News. 

Mrs. Blues— Do you have to treat your cook as if 
she were a member of your family? 

Mrs. Greys — Goodness, no! We have to be very 
kind and polite to her. — Oakland {Cal.) Times. 



Here is a bit of composition by an eight-year-old 
girl: " Boys are men that have not got as big as their 
papas. Boys are a trouble. If I had my way the world 
would be girls and the rest dolls. Man was made, and 
on the seventh day he rested. Woman was made 
then, and she has never rested since." 



The burning question of the day. — What is coal 
going to sell at next monh? 



BICYCLING. 



Indianapolis, Ind. 

Cycling is a furore here. Thousands of 
riders are on the streets, at all hours of the 
day. A colored woman who would weigh 
over 200 pounds has just wheeled gaily past. 
Lawyers, doctors, professors, clergymen and 
teachers ride bicycles — in fact, everyone 
rides, except ragmen and banana peddlers. 
We scarcely see a carriage on this street. 
It is a fine thoroughfare and every evening 
it is lined with cyclers of all descriptions — 
old and young, black and white. Women in 
bloomers are numerous. It is difficult to dis- 
tinguish women from men as they go spin- 
ning past. One of our neighbors was using 
his hose on his lawn and the cyclers kept 
riding over his grass, arousing his wrath. 
Finally he vowed he would turn the hose on 
the next man who rode over the lawn. This 
he did. To his horror a feminine shriek re- 
sounded from the deluged being and a 
woman rolled off the wheel, in hysterics. 
Five years ago four ladies rode the first bicy- 
cles here, to the deep disgust of the men of 
the town and the deeper disgust of the wo- 
men. Now the women who ride are legion 
and their number is increasing every day. 

Mrs. Jason Dame. 



him to hold the bicycle while she was learn- 
ing, but on June 11 he let goof her wheel 
and a fall resulted, in which her right leg was 
broken. 






Editor Recreation: 

Last Friday evening, three or four of the 
kids came tearing down to the house shout- 
ing, " Harve ! Harve ! yourbike'scome ! your 
bike's come !" You bet I lost no time in get- 
ting out the wheelbarrow and starting for the 
depot, with a crowd at my heels. 

I found the bike too large to wheel over, 
so the kids all took hold and helped me 
carry it to the house, and then we held a 
jubilee. 

On Saturday I learned to balance. Sunday 
of course father would not let me practice, 
but on Monday I mastered her, and to-day 
am able to spin along a narrow path. My 
back was awful sore Saturday night, though. 
Father is very much pleased with my wheel, 
while I am simply tickled to death; and the 
best of it all is I earned it myself and know 
how to value it. 

Now, Mr. Shields, I want to thank you, 
ever so much, for sending me such a nice 
wheel for the 75 subscriptions. I will keep on 
working for Recreation just the same. 
Harvey B. Crane Jr. 



Mrs. Margaret Elliott has begun 
suit in the Court of Common Pleas against 
A. G. Spalding & Bro. for $10,000 damages 
for personal injuries. She alleges that she 
visited the Madison Square Garden bicycle 
school for the purpose of learning to ride 
the bicycle. An instructor was detailed to 
give her a lesson, and she warned him to be 
careful, as she was timid. She requested 



Elaborate arrangements are being made 
by the Mercury Wheel Club for their annual 
meet at Flushing, L. I., September 7. The 
programme includes a one-mile race for the 
championship of Long Island; two-mile race 
for class A riders, handicap; one mile race 
for class A riders, handicap ; one mile race 
for the championship of the club, scratch; 
half-mile race for class A riders, scratch. 



The turnpike companies of Washington 
county, Md., have been advised that their 
charters give them power to collect toll from 
wheelmen, and the next legislature will be 
asked to establish uniform rates which the 
companies may charge them. 

The Century Wheelmen of this city an- 
nounce the following schedule of road runs : 
September 1 and 2, to Copake Lake; Sep- 
tember 8, to City Island; September 15, to 
Hempstead, L. I.; September 22, to Ridge- 
wood, N. J.; September 29, open. 

Chief Consul Potter, of the New York 
State Division of the L. A. W., declines a 
nomination for the presidency of the League. 
Vice-President Perkins is a candidate and 
proposes to make a vigorous canvass. 



The Maplewood (N. J.) Wheelmen have 
elected the following officers for the ensuing 
year: Dr. H. M. Carpenter, president; J. M. 
Whitfield, secretary and treasurer; M. 
Sammis, captain. 



In the race among the members of the 
Manhattan Bicycle Club for the medal for 
the greatest number of miles covered during 
the season, Captain Stanbach leads, with 
4,491 miles. 

At the second day's meeting of the Na- 
tional Circuit Tournament at Chicago, Eddie 
Bald broke another world's competitive rec- 
ord, riding one-third mile in 41 2-5 seconds. 

Cabanne is again in the ring. His victory 
at Marinette, Wis., was one of the most bril- 
liant of the year. Among the men he de- 
feated were Bald, Murphy and Cooper. 

Harry Wheeler, the New Jersey flyer, s 
he expects to even accounts with the riders 
who have been beating him, at the Spring- 
field tournament. 

The Quill Club Wheelmen are considering 

a proposition to hold a big race meet in 5 
tember. 



i47 



FISH AND FISHING. 



Among the large trout caught at Lake 
Edward, this spring, was one of five pounds 
by Frederic Remington, and J. W. Burdick, 
of the D. & H. C. Co.; one of four pounds by- 
Lewis E. Carr of Albany ; two of six pounds 
each by H. G. Gale and W. Jewell of Que- 
bec, and an ever increasing number of 
smaller ones, the total catch, up to the mid- 
dle of June, being about 4,000. Altogether, 
there wWe six trout caught weighing six 
pounds or more each, the largest of them all 
being taken by Landlord J. W. Baker of the 
Laurentide House. He had picked up an 
old, one-piece, bamboo pole, with a line tied 
to its tip and a hook on gimp, near one of the 
camps several miles down the lake; had 
baited up and had fished only a few minutes, 
off one of the best reefs, when he got a strike. 
After tiring his fish and bringing it up to the 
side of the boat, he tried to lift it in by 
means of the line — having neither landing 
net nor gaff — but lost it, and with it, the hook, 
gimp and a foot of line. When he told the 
story that evening to his guests and estima- 
ted the weight at fully seven pounds, there 
was an oppressive silence ; but, three weeks 
later, at another reef four miles from 
the former one, E. E. Darlmg and W..M. 
Peckham of Troy, caught a trout weighing 
six pounds two ounces, with Baker's hook 
fastened in its jaw, the gimp and line being 
still attached, and with a comparatively 
empty stomach. 

The most of the trout caught in Lake Ed- 
ward are taken with bait, but Dr. and Mrs. 
R. R. Trotter, of Yonkers, took 36 with the 
fly, inside of an hour. 



New York. 
Editor Recreation. 

The twin villages of Roscoe and Rock- 
land, in Sullivan County, this State, have 
long been noted for the excellent trout fish- 
ing in their immediate vicinity. Every year 
a few large trout are caught in the Willo- 
wemoc, the Beaverkill or their tributary 
brooks and ponds; but the following clipping, 
from the local newspaper, indicates that this 
year's big trout, taken near the end of June, 
was a surprisingly large one. 

" The large trout which was discovered in Palen's 

J)ond about two weeks ago was captured on Thursday 
ast. About 125 persons were present to see him lancf- 
ed. Mr. Geo. Cochran was the first to get hold of the 
big fellow and he, with a steady hand and cool head, 
needed no second trial, but held the gamy old fellow 
for keeps. The trout was taken to the Fish Hatch- 
ery and placed in one of the large tanks on exhibition. 
Several hundred people, from all parts of the state, 
have been going to the hatchery daily to see him. He 
measures 31^ inches in length and weighs q% pounds. 
Later. — The trout died yesterday morning, from 
the effects of injuries received when being caught. 
Supt. Annin states that the trout will be sent away to 
be mounted and then placed in the Hatchery at 
Rockland." 

Trout fry have been planted in all of the 
fishing waters in that vicinity, for several 
years. 



I have made a trip up there every spring 
for five years, staying at the house of Mr. W. 
B. Cochrane, at Roscoe, from which the 
rivers and brooks are readily accessible, and 
have always caught more or less trout, 
although it has never yet been my luck to 
get a big one. F. G. N. 



[The following correspondence is self- 
explanatory.] 

Syracuse, N. Y. 
Friend Shields : 

Our Anglers' Association, of this County, 
will hold an outing and prize fishing contest 
on June 7th. I am delegated to ask you for 
subscriptions to your excellent magazine, as 
prizes,- which we think would be appreciated. 
Send me orders for what you wish to give so 
they can be handed to winners. 
Yours truly, 

C. H. Mowry, 
Editor Sporting Goods Gazette. 



New York, June 5th, 1895. 

My dear Mr. Mowry : 

Replying to your favor of 3d: I am op- 
posed to all fishing and shooting contests ; 
that is, to large parties of men going out and 
killing as much game or catching as many 
fish as possible, on a wager. This class of 
alleged sport is condemned, now-a-days, by 
all conscientious sportsmen, and I trust your 
Club will never again indulge in it. 

Should your Club at any time hold a fly- 
casting contest or any other kind of match 
or tournament which should be deemed le- 
gitimate, I would gladly donate several sub- 
scriptions to be awarded as prizes ; but 
would not give them to promote a kind of 
contest of which I do not approve. 
Yours truly, 

G. O. Shields, 

Editor and Manager. 



Mr. W. W. Hall, of New York, has been 
fishing at Cape Vincent. He caught 142 
black bass that weighed 146 pounds, an av- 
erage of about one pound each. It is gen- 
erally conceded, among anglers, that a black 
bass weighing less than a pound is a baby, 
and that when such are caught they should 
be returned to the water. Of course Mr. 
Hall caught a great many weighing less than 
a pound. The report, gleaned from the local 
newspaper, states that he brought them all 
into the hotel at night. It is hoped he will 
never do so again. 



Dr. J. E. Hart, of Hegewisch, 111., was fined 
$10 and costs for shooting swallows. Served 
him right. 



148 



RECREATION. 



149 



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AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



POINTS FOR AMATEURS. 

As stated in a previous article, too many 
would-be amateurs are not careful enough 
in details. Photography is an art — a fine art 
— and to produce a fine picture, one full of 
life, feeling and effect, requires a good degree 
of artistic taste and skill, as well as care in 
all the details. ' 

To point the camera at an object and fire 
away without focussing, timing, or using any 
judgment is simply absurd. If you obtain 
an occasional good picture in this way, it is 
simply an accident. In getting ready to 
take a landscape or an out-door picture of 
any kind, we should have in view the gen- 
eral effect to be obtained and not let one 
part of the exposure stand out too sharp on 
the ground glass, and by its promine nee de- 
stroy the general effect desired. In other 
words we should strive to make all parts of 
the picture harmonize. Of course a fore- 
ground is just as necessary in a picture as a 
mid-ground or distance. Many amateurs 
think too much of the foreground; overload 
it and make it too prominent, thereby des- 
troying the desired effect. In focussing if it 
be impossible to get both distance and'fore- 
ground sharp, divide the focus; but give 
the foreground the preference, as this should 
be the sharpest. If there are figures in the 
picture have them in natural attitudes, re- 
presenting work. Give each of them some- 
thing to do, pleasure or sport. Don't allow 
them to stare at the camera. 

Dr. Wm. H. Steele. 



Sarony speaking of the status of women 
in professional photography, says: 

"We require the -finest talent that can be 
had in the country. The operators, who do 
nearly all the mechanical work, are, of 
course, at the top. Next in order are the 
negative retouchers. This is fine, delicate 
work, well adapted to a woman, and they 
earn from $15 to $30 a week. The printers 
receive from $12 to $25 a week; mounters, 
about $7 to $12 a week, and the spotters — 
those who remove blemishes — also from $7 
to $12 a week." 

If any woman could find a way to 
really remove blemishes from the faces of 
the customers she could no doubt earn a 
salary of $100 a week. 



Fixing Bath. Thirty-two ounces of 
Sulphite of Soda (Hydrometer test 60), add 
to this 1 ounce of Sulphuric Acid, very 
slowly, and 8 ounces solution of Chrome 
Alum (Hydrometer test 60), then add the 
whole to 2 gallons saturated solution of 
Hypo, and it is ready for use. 



much of street fakirs' "cure alls." Use, say 
two kinds of developers, as, for instance, 
Metol for rapid work, and use it just as the 
manufacturer directs. It will bring up any 
thing that the light has ever had access to. 
Hydrochinonine for very slow plates, such as 
those of a sensitometer of 12 to 16 or 20, 
that have had a liberal exposure. 

W. R. L. Dwyer, M. D. 



Powdered aluminum, for flash-light work, 
has been recommended. The following is a 
formula : Powdered aluminum, 30 parts; 
potassium chlorate, 70 parts. After mixing, 
the compound should be handled carefully, 
as there is always a danger of explosion. 
The aluminum powder should be heated in 
an iron pan sufficiently to drive away all 
greasy matter. A combination of magnesi- 
um and aluminum has been recommended 
by Wladiminsky, in the Photographische 
Rundschau : 70 parts of potassium chlorate; 
40 parts of potassium perchlorate; 45 parts 
of magnesium, and 20 parts of aluminum, 
are powdered separately, and, after a careful 
mixture, made up into small cartridges. A 
small tuft of gun cotton is placed at the bot- 
tom, and acts as a fuse. — Photographic 
Times. 



Prof. Boys, in his recent experiments in 
photographing flying projectiles, makes an 
exposure of less than the millionth of a sec- 
ond, the first tenth part of this period being 
sufficient to produce the image of the projec- 
tile. This is accomplished by means of an 
electric spark as brilliant and as short as 
possible, the bullet itself completing the cir- 
cuit. The action of the air in the path of a 
flying projectile is similar to that of the wa- 
ter in the wake of a swiftly moving boat. 
These air waves, however, are only formed 
when the speed of the projectile is greater 
than that of sound. Prof. Boys' experi- 
ments were made with one of the new mag- 
azine rifles recently issued to the English 
troops. 

The Seattle Camera Club has now attained 
a membership of nearly 60, among whom 
are a good many who would like to exchange 
with brother amateurs of the Eastern States. 
Any one desirous of arranging for such ex- 
changes should address the Secretary of the 
society, Mr. Emil de Neuf. 



When you have occasion to make guide 
marks on your ground glass, do it with slate 
pencil. Then you can see the mark from 
the outside. 



J. H. J. Do not combine any two develop- 
ing agents in one developer. It savors too 



Subscribe for Recreation. 



150 



RECREATION. 



VII 



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Vlll 



RECREATION. 



A NEW YOSEMITE. 

Dr. L. B. Sperry, of Bellevue, 0., a well 
known lecturer, has returned from a trip to 
Puget sound, going and returning over the 
Great Northern Railway. He stopped at 
Lake Chelan, in the Cascades, and at Lake 
McDonald, in the Rockies, looking up vari- 
ous points of interest to tourists and scien- 
tists. He says that the scenic and scientific 
attractions in the regions about the two lakes 
above named are most remarkable. Dr. 
Sperry and party penetrated the trackless 
forests to a point about 15 miles northeast 
of Lake McDonald, and there came upon 
one of the most charming nooks on this con- 
tinent — a place that he thinks is destined to 
become as famous as Niagara falls. 

He was accompanied by Prof. J. Paul 
Goode, of the Moorhead normal school ; E. 
R. Shepard, of Minneapolis, photographer, 
and W. O. Jones and W. A. Wittick, also of 
Minneapolis. 

At the head of Lake McDonald they se- 
cured guides and packers, and from the end 
of the trail leading northward from the lake 
the> chopped their way through several 
miles of tangled forests, where only the 
trails of bears and deer could be seen. 
About noon of the second day they came 
upon a horseshoe-shaped basin about two 
miles long and one mile wide, shut in by 
walls that rose almost perpendicular to 
heights ranging from 3,000 to 4,000 feet 
The floor of this basin is a lake about half 
a mile wide by a mile and a half long. It is 
deep, clear blue, and is filled with mountain 
trout. It is surrounded by several peaks, 
which rise from 1,000 to 2,000 feet above the 
timber line, and are covered with snow 
wherever there is a surface for snow to hang 
on. Along a portion of the southern wall 
there is a slope, descending from a height 
of about 2,000 feet down to the border of 
the lake. This slope is covered with a dense 
growth of forest tr es, mostly fir and hem- 
lock. Just as the -party was emerging from 
the forest into the basin they heard a rush- 
ing avalanche ; and while in the basin saw 
and heard another shoot down the steep 
slopes into a great rocky chasm. Evidently 
these are of frequent occurrence here, and 
so the place was named Avalanche basin 
and Avalanche lake. Rising from the high 
enclosing walls are a number of peaks, 
which the party named, respectively, " The 
Sphinx," "Cathedral Spires," "The Dome," 
" The Castle," and " The Matterhorn." The 
latter is a surprising duplicate of the famous 
Alpine peak of that name. At the head of 
the basin two streams of ice water pour 
down the cliffs. For the most part they 
cling to the walls and look like ribbons of 
silver ; but occasionally they leap over a 
ledge and pour themselves in spray on the 
walls hundreds of feet below. The total 
height of these streams must be at least 
2,500 feet. Above the falls lie vast fields of 
snow which furnish supplies to the cascades. 



Dr. Sperry pronounces Avalanche basin 
"a scenic gem of the first water." He be- 
lieves that it will become exceedingly popu- 
lar in the near future. He says that after a 
good saddle trail shall have been cut to it, all 
summer tourists, via the Great Northern, 
should stop at Lake McDonald and take a 
horseback trip to Avalanche valley and lake. 



The St. Lawrence Anglers' Association, of 
which W. C. Brown of New York is presi- 
dent, is making an effort to have the Thous- 
and Islands set apart as an international 
park. Many of the islands are being acquired 
by private owners, and if the present rate of 
sale is continued it will be but a short time 
till the fishing and camping privileges will 
be a thing of the past. Even now fishing 
parties are met with such signs as " No 
trespassing," "Keep off," and the like. 

The Canadian government is willing to set 
aside some of its best river islands to be im- 
proved and beautified for the use of fishing 
parties and such others as may come, pro- 
vided the State of New York will take simi- 
lar steps. 

A Senate committee, together with some 
members of the Fish and Game Commission, 
will soon go to the river to inspect the islands, 
and will then go to Ottawa to consult with 
the Canadian officials and endeavor to arrive 
at some definite plan of action. 



Here are the names of some anglers who 
have recently visited the Island House, Lake 
St. John, Canada, and of their catches of 
Ouananich : 

No of Fish Largest. 
Caught. lbs. 

J. B. Goodhue, Rock Island, 111.... 16 3 l / 2 

Jos. Gamble, Plattsburg, N. Y 8 2 l / 2 

William Borden, Chicago 16 3^ 

D.H. Ainsworth, San Antonio. Tex. 28 tfA 

J. L. Hayden, San Antonio, Tex.. . 14 3 

H. Beausobil, Montreal 26 3^ 

J. C. Hecksher, New York 11 4 

Wm. Borden & Son, Chicago 20 3^ 

Guy Peterson, Montreal 10 3 

Walter Drake, New York 12 3 




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RECREATION. 



IX 




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E. C 




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RECREATION. 



WHAT THEY SAY OF IT. 

Herewith I enclose check for $7.00 and list of seven 
subscribers. Please send me " The Big Game of North 
America." I prefer your books to guns and rifles. 
The end is not yet. Shall send you some more names 
soon. I carry a sample copy of Recreation in my 
pocket all the time and show it whenever I have a 
chance. Shall have my copies bound for my library 
where I can get it if I have the blues. It will soon 
drive them away. 

C. L. Macomber, Worcester, Mass. 



7.00, for which send 
following personal 



Please find enclosed check for % 
Recreation one year to the 
friends of mine. ' 

I have read your magazine for six months and think 
it the best one in America. I showed some copies to 
the boys one evening and these seven asked me to 
send in their names at once. I think it just the journal 
for lovers of sport. 

C. A. Corey, Westfield, Wis. 

The nearest approach to an outing in the hills or by 
the brook is to read Recreation. The greatest fault 
I find with it is that it doesn't come often enough. It 
should be a weekly. I should prefer to have it a daily. 
I begin at the front cover, read it through, and then 
read it backwards— covers and all. 

Chas. J. Halpen, Haverhill, Mass. 



Saw first copy Recreation last night. Can't resist 
addingit tomylistof sportsmen's papers. I think it is 

trand. Every man, boy, girl and woman in the 
Inited States ought to read it. I showed it to two 
friends this evening. They think as I do, and want it, 
for which I enclose $3.00. 

Dr. E. J. Miller, Scotland, S. Dak. 



I have read Recreation regularly, beginning with 
the first number. It is the neatest and pleasantest 
little magazine I have ever read. Its name is very 
appropriate. Even the advertisements are by no means 
dry reading. Enclosed please find $1.00 for year's sub- 
scription for one of my friends. 

W. C. Kendall, Schooner " Grampus," 

Gloucester, Mass. 

After reading the first numbers of Recreation I 
can't resist the temptation to subscribe for it, though 
already pretty well supplied with this kind of literature. 
To me such a magazine as Recreation is simply 
irresistible. Coquina, I wish you such success as 
your labors deserve. 

-John O'Kane, Van Buren, Ark. 



Have received a copy of Recreation and as I 
glanced over its pages my interest was awakened to 
know more of its contents. After reading several 
articles I am surprised that you can furnish such an 
interesting and tastefully arranged magazine for so 
little money. It is rightly named, and I wish you suc- 
cess in its publication. 

M. G. Hull, Newark, 111. 



Enclosed find one dollar, for which please send 
Recreation to the address of my friend, given below, 
beginning with the first number. Long live Recrea- 
tion' I am a friend to it always. 1 do not know of 
a more suitable present to make a brother sportsman 
than Recreation. 

W. S. Cleveland. 



I have read a copy of Recreation with great in- 
terest and desire to express my high opinion of it. It 
deserves the support of all lovers of true sport. I own 
part of your publications, have read more of them, 
and have never failed to be pleased with your writ- 
ings. Best wishes for your abundant success. 

W. H. Hollis. Tacoma, Wash. 

Herewith $1.00 for subscription to Recreation. 
It is the best sportsman's journal published, at any 
price, and all the fraternity have been glad to note its 
phenomenal and deserved growth. 

E. A. Jackson, New York. 



A friend gave me a copy of Recreation last week, 
and I was so taken up with its delightful stories that 
I at once had a newsdealer get me copies of the back 
numbers. I take two sportsmen's magazines, but like 
Recreation the best. Please find enclosed $1.00 for 
a year's subscription. 

J. Harry Thomas, Canton, Mich. 

Allow me to congratulate you on the great success, 
which is apparent to everybody, of your magazine. 
I want to say, personally, that this success has 
come because it has been fairly earned. 

Stanley Waterloo, Chicago. 



The copy of Recreation reached me safe, and to 
say that I am pleased with it is a very mild way of 
mtting it. It is immense, and I enclose my check 
or a year's subscription. 

F. C. Kinney, M.D., Greensboro, Vt. 



F< 



Please send me Recreation. I have never seen 
it, but I am familiar with "Coquina," having often 
read articles by him in the sportsmen's papers. 1 re- 
cognize him as a kindred spirit. Long may he live 
and prosper, is the earnest wish of 

Geo. W. Moriarty, Opelousas, La. 



A friend of mine brought me a sample copy of Re- 
creation, and I must say that the quality of the 
articles, as well as the handsome manner in which the 
magazine is gotten up, surpasses anything of its class 
I have ever seen. 

Paul L. Mottelay, New York. 



I have to-day received the June number of Recrea- 
tion and congratulate you on the beauty and merit 
of the magazine. If the excellent quality is maintained 
it must be a success in every way. 

M. K. Barnum, North Platte, Neb. 

I appreciate Recreation more than I can say. It 
fills a long felt want, especially in this season of 
the year, when I am unable to get away from my du- 
ties long enough to burn any powder. 

Fred. W. Kreidler, Miles City, Mont. 



The Davenport rifle which you sent me, for a club 
of 10 subscribers to Recreation, is at hand, and is 
a beauty. I am more than pleased with it. 

Chas. B. Long, Lancaster, Pa. 



Enclosed find one dollar for which please send me 
Recreation for one year. Your magazine is fine. 
One needs only to see a sample copy of it in order to 
become a subscriber. 

L. W. Earle, Tomah, Wis. 

Recreation is the finest magazine I ever read. 
Everyone seems delighted with it as soon as he has 
looked at it. 

M. Phillips, Glover, Vt. 



Your magazine is beautiful. How can you afford to 
give so much for so little ? 

• Samuel C. Clarke, Marietta, Ga. 



I received the copies of Recreation to-day and am 
greatly pleased with them. 1 think this is the best 
magazine of its class I have ever seen. 

Wm. Percival, Clinton, N. Y. 

I consider Recreation far ahead of any other pub- 
lication of its class. 

M. A. Bates, Star, Idaho. 



Am much pleased with Recreation. I think it 
more entertaining than any of its class. 

E. T. Johnson. 

Recreation is a sparkling gem of the first water. 
J. H. Wheeler, Newburyport, Mass. 



Recreation is grand and improves with every 
number. A. Howard. 



RECREATION. 



XI 




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RECREATION. 



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doz.; 2 yds., 40c doz.; 3 yds., 60c doz. 

TROUT FLIES, 16c doz. 

BASS AND PICKEREL SPOONS, 5c. each. 

BRAIDED OIL SILK LINES, No. G, 25 yds., 

19c; 50 yds., 35c; 100 yds., 70c No. F, 25 yds., 

25c; 50 yds., 50c; 100 yds., 95c. 

Send 2c stamp for 74 page Illustrated Catalogue 
and Special List No. 4. 

JAMES F. MARSTERS, 

51, 53 and 55 Court St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A correspondent of the Boston Coui'ier 
writes : " The journey up the famous Hud- 
son is undoubtedly the most interesting and 
picturesque inland voyage in the United 
States. It has been described and re-de- 
scribed, however, until the task of investing 
an account of its varied and beautiful scenery 
with any flavor of novelty has become utter- 
ly hopeless. But its attractions, though stale 
in narrative, are perennially charming to the 
actual sense, and the point of view afforded 
by the palatial steamers ' New York ' and 
' Albany,' of the day line, is an ideal one. 
These magnificent boats are unique in one 
feature, which will be appreciated by tourists; 
being designed for day service and tourist 
purposes only, they carry no freight whatever, 
save personal baggage of passengers. Thus, 
the lower forward decks and other desirable 
points of view, usually monopolized by un- 
appreciative packages of merchandise, are 
open to passengers, and the fittings and 
accommodations of the craft throughout are 
of a more light and elegant order, 
and upon a more uniformly sumptuous 
plan than is usually possible. Veritable 
pleasure boats, every suggestion of toil is 
banished from their decks, and the holiday 
atmosphere engendered by external circum- 
stances and a happy purpose is thus subtly 
maintained." 

Please find enclosed $5.00, for which send Recrea- 
tion one year to the five gentlemen named below. I 
am a constant reader of nearly all the sportmen's 
publications, but think Recreation just lies over 
them all a few pegs. It is THE sportsman's magazine. 
John H. Steele, Haverhill, Mass, 



DRY MATCHES! 

IN the 

Perfection Water = Proof 
flatchbox. 




Indispensable to sportsmen who hunt, fish, trap, 
camp or sail. 

Size, 2y x inches long, % inches diameter, beautifully 
nickel-plated. Price $1, postage prepaid. Order at once. 

You can fill this box with matches, lay it in water 
over night, and the next morning they wiil light as if 
they had been kept in a powdei magazine. 

J. R. PAINTER, 

Manufacturer and Importer of Musical 
Boxes, Etc. 

1229 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Brooklyn, May 4th, 1895. 
G. W. Cole & Co., New York. 

Gentlemen: — Please send me some more 
"Three in One" Compound. I think it is 
the best rust preventive I have ever used. 
It does not soil my hands and clothing, and 
covers all parts effectively. I shall continue 
to use it and recommend it to my friends. 

Geo. w. Kellam. 



Kaufman, Texas, Oct. 10, 1894. 
M. A. Smith, Phila., Pa., 

Dear Sir : I am here on a hunting trip, 
wearing your boots every day, and the 
longer I wear them, the more I like them. 
Yours is the lightest, most nearly noiseless, 
most comfortable and easy boot a sportsman 
ever wore. C. L. Reierson. 



During the last few years the rail shooting 
on the old Hackensack meadows seems to 
be improving. The birds are not yet strong 
on flight and not as fat as they will be when 
the oats ripen, but we expect some good 
bags on openday, Monda\, August 26th, and 
for three or four weeks. On good water, a man 
ought to get at least 40 or 50 shots a day. 
Any one desjring information about tides, 
pushers, etc , can get it by writing Capt. 
John H. Wygants, Hackensack, N. J., or 
Francis Ford, Little Ferry, N. J. 

Rallus. 



I did not receive the copies of Recreation until 
yesterday. Have five subscribers for you now, and 
expect to have as many more by this time to-morrow. 
I believe I can take at least 100 subscriptions here, 
and perhaps more. Every one to whom I have shown 
Recreation thinks it is fine, and no one whom I 
have asked has yet declined to take it. 

Mark R. Perkins, Sheridan, Wyo. 



RECREATION. 



Xlll 



THE "DAVENPORT" SINGLE GUN 

MODEL '94. EJECTOR. 




TUT AS detachable barrel, with heavy lug securely bolted, and having extra strong screw key fastening. Frame 
*~ ■*■ either nickel-plated or casehardened, top snap action, rebounding lock, automatic ejector positive in 
action and perfectly reliable, drop forged steel parts, extra heavy fine steel barrels, 30 inch, carefully choke 
bored, finely checkered pistol grip stock, rubber butt plate and fancy checkered fore-end. Thoroughly high 
grade in finish and detail. Furnished in 12, 16 and 20 gauge. Weight, SK to 6% lbs. *. _ 

This and other standard shot guns and rifles, made bv 

THE W. H. DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO., 

Send for Catalogue. NORWICH, CONN. 



Ejector Guns 
no longer a 
luxury. 




GOOD NEWS FOR SPORTSMEN. 

Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 
within the reach of every sportsman. 
Our New Ejector Movement 
Has only two pieces: One in the 
Hammer, One in 
the Frame. 



TEA'S OF THOUSANDS IN USE. 

Send for Catalogue. 

LEFEVER ARMS CO., - 

[Mention Recreation. 1 



We have decided to meet 
the demand for medium price 
Ejectors, and are now pre- 
pared to accept orders for 
all grades of our hammerless 
guns fitted with Ejectors. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



Date, 1895. 

Q. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 136 West 24th St., New York : 
Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send me RECREATION 
for one year. 

Name, 



No. 



Street, P. O., 



County, State, 



Remit ty P. 0. or Express Money Order, cr New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT AND SEND IN. 



XIV 



RECREATION. 



Wanted. — Congenial sportsman to join 
party of three on a month's hunt for Big 
Game (Elk, Bear, Deer, Sheep and small 
game) in Montana. Will also spend a week 
in Yellowstone Park. Trout fishing galore. 
Address J. R. Painter, 

1229 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

N. B. — We leave here Sept. 5th to 10th. 

W. L. Winegar, hunter and guide, Elgin, 
Fremont county, Idaho. Tourists and hunt- 
ing parties outfitted and conducted through 
the Rocky mouritains and the Yellowstone 
National Park. Big game of all kinds abun- 
dant. References: W. B. Bogert, 96 Board 
of Trade, Chicago ; J. B. Nelligar, 72 State 
street, Chicago. 

Ed.H.Trafton, Hayden, Fremont county, 
Idaho. Hunter and guide for Teton basin, 
Jackson's Hole, and the National Park. In 
the heart of the big game country. Refer- 
ences : Dean Sage, Albany, N. Y.; S. D. 
Webster, Chattanooga, Tenn.; W. C. Mc- 
Kinny, Dallas, Texas. 

Nelson Yarnall, hunter and guide, Du- 
bois, Wyoming. Am perfectly familiar with 
the mountain country to the south and east 
of Yellowstone National Park. Am pre- 
pared to furnish complete outfits, and con- 
duct hunting parties in '. first-class style. 
Best of references, from both military men 
and civilians. 

Ira Dodge, mountaineer and guide, col- 
lector of wild animals, Cora, Wyoming. 
Complete transportation outfits furnished. 
Hunting parties and National Park excur- 
sionists. Correspondence solicited. 



We can accommodate a tew hunting 
parties during the chicken shooting season 
at our farm 15 miles east of Stephen, Minn., 
on the G. N.'R. R. Comfortable quarters, 
good table, plenty of garden truck, good 
teams. Charges reasonable. Prairie chick- 
ens and ruffed grouse are plentiful this sea- 
son and promise good sport. 

Address Mrs. Maud I. Hall, Nelson 
Park, Fir P. O., Marshall County, Minn. 

R. W. Rock, practical mountaineer and 
guide, Lake P. O., Idaho. I live in one of 
the best game ranges in the Northwest; fine 
trout fishing also 'within easy reach. Hunt- 
ing and tourist parties outfitted and guided. 
References on application. Correspondence 
solicited. 



Persons wishing to hunt big game, such 
as bear, moose, elk, deer, mountain-sheep 
and antelope, and to board in a ranch where 
there is plenty of small game, and where 
trout fishing is unequaled, address F. E. 
White, Guide, Marysvale, Uinta Co., Wyom- 



ing. 



Would like to exchange mounted heads 
of Deer, Antelope, or Rocky Mountain 
Sheep for high grade Bicycle. 

J. H. Shuckhart, Carbondale, Col. 



James Fullerton, practical mountaineer 
and guide, Ten Sleep, Wyoming. Elk, 
sheep, deer, bear, lions, antelope, grouse and 
trout, all within K miles of my ranch. Would 
accommodate a few boarders at our ranch, 
on No-Wood river, at the foot of the Big 
Horn mountains. 

Wanted. — A second-hand, double-bar- 
reled, breech-loading gun (hammer or ham- 
merless), weighing 6 to 7 pounds. State 
price and full particulars. Address, J. H. T., 
care Recreation. 

The undersigned has been in the woods 
of Maine, in the fall, for the last four years. 
He would like to correspond with a sober, 
congenial young man who desires to go into 
the woods about Sept. 15th, for a month or 
six weeks, or would like to join a small party 
having such plans. Snake medicine to be 
excluded. Elfir, P. O. Box 2746, Boston. 

From the President of the Agassiz Association, 
Harlan H. Ballard, A. M. 

" It is the finest book on American birds issued 
since Audubon's, and is pronounced by some authori- 
ties superior to that now rare and costly work." 

THE BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA. 

One Hundred and Nineteen Plates 12 x 15 Ins. 
Over 800 Birds Drawn and Colored from Life. 

Includes all our species, artistically reproduced in 
all their shades of color, true to natural plumage and 
botanical surrounding ; with a copious text embrac- 
ing the observations made by the most eminent 
writers on Ornithology. The work is a superb Im- 
perial quarto, and is sold at net prices as follows : 

In fine Half Bindings, $40; in Full, $45; Russia, 
Duck or Morocco, gold edges. 

ISSUED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF 

The Natural Science Association of America. 

1 14 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

" A wonderful work." — Good Citizen. 

" A Great Work." — National Teacher. 

" A magnificent Ornithological work." — Turf, 
Field 6° Farm. 

" A magnificent work, equal to 'Audubon's Birds,' 
giving all the birds of North America, with elaborate 
plates in natural colors accompanied by descriptions." 
— Education, Boston. 

" If artistic and beautifully colored plates, letter- 
press of the highest order, and scientific knowledge 
reduced to the plainest terms can make up a valuable 
work, this certainly deserves that designation."— Am- 
erican Sportsman. 

From Dr. Elliott Cones, President of the American 
Ornithologists' Union, Author of "Birds of the 
Northwest," "Colorado Valley," "Key to North 
American Birds : " 

" I can heartily recommend the whole work as one 
admirably meeting the design of a popular orni- 
thology of North America at once instructive and 
entertaining, at a reasonable price. The text is per- 
fectly reliable. The technical nomenclature is cor- 
rect, being that used by the best ornithologists of 
the country." 

From Right Rev. Bishop A. Cleveland Cox, D.D., 
LL.D.: 

" For a family of intelligent children, here is a book 
which may furnish a never-failing fountain of interest 
and entertainment. I count him a happy man who 
can afford to lay it before his family and guests. How 
pure, how ennobling such a study! It may prompt 
youthful genius to further researches in these fields ; 
and if it tempts a young girl to try her hand at draw- 
ing or coloring such portraits of our feathered visitors 
and co-citizens for purposes of domestic ornament, it 
will be a happy result. I recommend this book to 

fmrchasers — a very rare sort of a commendation 
rom me." 

From Prof. C. S. Maynard, Author of " The Birds 
of Florida," and " Birds of Eastern N. A. :" 

" i am much pleased with ' Studer's Birds of North 
America.' In the grouping of the birds, arrangement 
of light and shade in the perspective, and delineations 
of the forms and feathers, Dr. lasper has certainly 
surpassed all other artists, producing the best pic- 
tures of the species which I have ever seen." 



RECREATION. 



XV 



In this preparation are combined the remedies 
which above ail others have been established as in- 
valuable in the treatment of the various forms of 
digestive disorders — Pepsin, Bismuth and Nux Vom- 
ica. The Pepsin used is concentrated and of the 
highest digestive power. The Bismuth is the purest 
the market affords. The Nux Vomica is the best Eng- 
lish extract. The efficacy of this combination lies in 
its triple effect — that of the actual solvent action of 
the Pepsin on all articles of food, the prevention o^ 
fermentation and formation of gases by the Bismuth, 
and the stimulant effect of the Nux Vomica (which is 
undoubtedly the best known tonic for nervous dys- 
pepsia) on the secretion of the digestive fluids. 
H 

A Remedy for Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Headache, 
Heartburn and Sonr Stomach. 

Will Restore Rosy Cheeks, Elastic Step 
and Happy Spirits. 

H 

PRICE, 25 6* 50c. PER BOTTLE, POST PAID. 

A. J. D1TMAN, Chemist, 

2 Barclay Street, New York. 

M.R.PERKINS, 

SHERIDAN, WYOMING, 

KEEPS A FULL AND COMPLETE LINE OF 

GUNS, CARTRIDGES, 

Fishing Tackle, 

5:5: TENTS, ^Z 

Saddles, Harness, Horse Clothing, 

and everything in the line of 

SPORTSMEN'S SUPPLIES. 



Tourists and sportsmen visiting the Yellowstone 
Park or the Great Hunting Grounds of Wyoming, can 
hnd here everything needed in the way of an outfit, at 
eastern prices with freight added. 



All Kinds of Large and Small Game. 
Excellent Mountain Trout Fishing:. 

GUIDES, TEAMS, SADDLE & 
PACK ANIMALS FURNISHED. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



Geneva, Ohio. 

I think the man who would 
not subscribe for RECREA- 
TION is away behind the 
times. I consider it worth 
double its present price, and 
shall always do all I can for 
its advancement. 

Have seen the Forehand 
gun you sent Mr. E. A. Corey, 
as a premium for 35 subscrip- 
tions, and think it a beauty. 
Mr Corey says it is a splendid 
shooter, and has little or no 
recoil. 

C. H. WESTLAKE. 

JAMES E. THURSBY, 

45 Broadway, N. Y. 

Railway Equipment 
and Supplies. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



The IDEAL BOOT 

and SHOE for STILL 
HUNTING are AB- 
SOLUTELY NOISE- 
LESS. 

Uppers made of the best 
quality heavy Horse Hide, 
Colors, dark gray and black. 
tanned and finished same 
as Buck or Moose Leather, 
softas a glove, tough enough 
to stand the wear and tear of briars and brush, no 
exposure to repeated wettings will ever harden. By 
a peculiar and new process, the upper is rendered en- 
tirely waterproof. 

The experience and suggestions of very many critical 
and experienced Hunters combined, has resulted in 
the production of this. The Ideal Hunting: Shoe, and 
pronounced by all who get them the Climax oi 
Making. The bottom is wide, made up of two eli 
soles, rubber cemented together, halt an inch thick, 
impervious to wet, will not glaze and slip. Electric 
Sole is a new process tanned COW HIDE. fl< 
easy as a Moccasin, as substantia] as a Stoga Boot 
and exceedingly light in weight. And all the part- are 
put together in workmanlike manner, handstltched, 
perfect in every detail, very neat in appeal 
able for any occupation requiring absolute cornl 
tramping, or exposure of any kind The 1 .a 
10 inches high, eyelets and studs, bellows tongue, 
lined throughout with rubber cloth, porous, will not 
sweat. The Boot is 18 inches high, laced insti 
laced at top outside to tighten to the leg. 
you want heels or spring heels, and if you want 
Hob Nailed. Also give size leg ten inches troni 
of heel with other measurements and size of 
wanted. Will send this Ideal Lace Shoe to any a I 
on receipt of $7.50. The Ideal Boot on 
$10.00. If made to measure, will deliver in ten 
First class sporting goods houses are mvi1 
for samples and terms. 

fVI. A. SMITH, 
Manufacturer of Shoe Specialties, Gymnasium 

and Sporting Shoes, 
25 & 27 North 13th Street, Philadelphia, Pa 




XVI 



RECREATION. 



TAXIDERMISTS' 




SUPPLIES. 

Artificial Glass Eyes 

For Stuffed Birds and Animals. 

OOLOGISTS' AND ENTOMOLOGISTS' 
SUPPLIES. 

Send 2-c. stamp for Taxidermists' Catalogue to 

FRED. KAEMPFER, 

TAXIDERMIST, 

21 7 Madison St., . . Chicago, 111. 

All specimens of natural history prepared 
and mounted true to nature in the best style of 
art and at reasonable prices. 



SYNONYMOUS ! 
PURITY 



AND 



Walpole Double Refined Chemicals. 



Pioneer "Hypo" Plant in America. 



\A/alpole Chemical Co., 

(Business Founded 1870.) 

WALPOLE, HASS. 

G. GENNERT, 24 EAST 13TH STREET, NEW YORK. 

EASTERN AND SOUTHERN TRADE AGENTS. 

HENRY MILWARD & SONS, 
Pish Hooks, 

Hooks on Gut, Gut Leaders, Cork Floats, Etc. 

WE HAVE SECURED SOLE RIGHTS AND ENTIRE CONTROL OF THE 

" INIillTABLE " TROUT AND BASS FLIES. 

These Flies have the best imitation of the natural wings ever offered. 

Wings are waterproof, buoyant, flexible, very tenacious and not affected by the solar rays. 

If your Local Dealer has not these Flies, send for Sample Dozen. 

Inimitable Trout Flies, $1.00 doz. Inimitable May Flies, $1.25 doz. Inimitable Bass Flies, $1.50 doz. 

If not fully to your satisfaction money will be refunded on receipt of returned goods. 

NO CATALOGUE. LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE. 




C. B. Fl 

Broadway, NEW YORK. 



MAURICE, 

United States Representative. 



RECREATION. 



xvi 1 



fKATS it 



They're all talking about it, 

and they say it's a dandy. 
THE "IDEAL" 

LOADING MACHINE 

Is the only one that will handle all kinds of powder correctly. 
IDEAL. HAND BOOK, No. 5, just out. 80 pages of solid in- 
formation on loading shells, etc. Stamps for postage acceptable. 
IDEAL MFG. CO., Drawer 86 New Haven, Conn., U. 8. A. 




LOOK 

AT THE 

PRICE. 



[Mention Recreation.] 



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BOOKS BY G. 0. SHIELDS. (COQUINA.) 



THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA. 

Its Habits, Habitat, Haunts, and Characteristics. How, When and 
Where to Hunt it. 

8yo, 600 Pages, 80 Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5.00. 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES. 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur Photography, Hunting 

and Fishing, with Special Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, 

the Buffalo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 

Deer ; also on Trouting in the Rocky Mountains ; on a 

Montana Roundup ; Life among the Cowboys, 

etc. 

12 mo, 300 Pages, 75 Illustrations. Cloth, $2 ; Half Morocco, $8. 

AMERICAN GAME FISHES. 

How, When and Where to Angle for Them. 
8to, 400 Pages, 60 Illustrations. Cloth, $2.50 ; Half Morocco, $4.00. 



HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST. 

(RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES.) 

Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and Stream. 
12mo Cloth. Oyer 300 Pages, Illustrated. Price, 75 Cents. 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG. 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics, Utility, Breeding, 

Training, Diseases, and Kennel Management of 

all Breeds of Dogs. 

8 to, 650 Pages, 100 Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5 ; 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS. 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sportsmen. 
12mo, 200 Pages, 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 



THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE. 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with the Nez Perce Indians 
in the Big Hole Basin, Montana, August 9, 1877. 
12mo. 150 Pages, Profusely Illustrated. Cloth, $1. 



These books will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the 
author. 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

136 WEST 24TH STREET, NEW YORK. 



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XV111 



RECREATION. 



Stock part detached 
from barrel. 




Action Open, ejecting 
Shell. 



THE "BURGESS" GUN 

12 ga. Repeating Shot-Gun. 

Latest, Quickest, Simplest, Safest. 

The ideal action. Movement in direct line between 
points of support. Double hits in 1-8 second ; three hits 
in one second ; six hits in less than three seconds. 

Address for circulars, 

BURGESS GUN CO., Buffalo, N. Y. 



You may own a magnificent Lens, 

A camera of perfect parts; 
Use a Cramer, Seed, Hammer or Carbutt, 

Whichever's the best in the marts. 

You may swear by Albumen or Ilo, 
American, Kamack, or Kosmos ; 

But attainment of perfect results 

Is dependent, a photographer knows, 

On the Chemicals used in the art. 

All agree, we're sure you'll find, 
To get the perfection desired, 

Use the Walpole Double Refined. 



"DIETZ" 

TUBULAR HUNTING LAMP. 

PATENTED. 

Looks like a locomotive head-light. 

It will not biow nor jar out. 

The hood over the front works perfectly and with- 
out noise. When the hood is down no light escapes. 

It will throw a powerful light 200 feet. 

It burns kerosene oil, and will burn 10 hours with- 
ont re-filling. ' 

11 INCHES HIGH. 6 INCHES IN DIAMETER. WEIGHT 2 1-2 LBS- 

It is compact and handsome. Has a bail and can 
be used as a hand and wall lantern in camp. Gives a 
brilliant light, and is absolutely safe. 

Price $4.00 

Will be sent by mail or express, prepaid, anywhere 
in the United States or Canada, on receipt of price and 
50 cents for postage or expressage. 

R. E DIETZ CO., 60 LAIGHT ST., NEW YORK. 




s^TACKLET 
MANCHESTEB>VT> 



Do You Know? 

that the 

HANNAFORD 

VENTILATED RUBBER BOOTS 

are worn at all seasons with 




Absolute Comfort. 

NO SWEATING. 

A.sk your dealer for them, 
or send for catalogue. 

HANNAFORD 
VENTILATED' 
BOOT CO,, 79 MILK ST., BOSTON, 



Ten letters, only, make my name ; 
Come try to solve this puzzle game. 

My first is found in Pickerel, 

My second is in Pike, 
My third in Carp, my fourth in Perch, 

(Do you this puzzle like ?) 
My fifth in Sucker, sixth in Bass, 

My seventh in Catfish, 
My eighth in Grayling, ninth in Trout, 

My tenth in Ouananiche. 

One curious feature of the game, 
If you have liked my rhyme, 
Is that, while you have sought for me, 
You've had me all the time. 

F. G. 

A yearly subscription to Recreation for 
the first person sending in a correct answer 
to this puzzle. — Ed. 



A certain writer, who is an authority on 
everything pertaining to camping, wrote an 
article for Recreation strongly recommend- 
ing the Jaeger underwear to persons going 
into the woods. The letter was submitted 
to the Jaeger Company, with the suggestion 
that it was a valuable advertisement for 
their goods, and that an announcement 
thereof ought to appear in the advertising 
columns of the magazine, when the letter 
should be printed. The ancient " Doctor " 
who manages (?) the advertising department 
of that company, objected to the publication 
of the article because it contained a clause 
telling how to restore flannels that had 
shrunk, to their original size. The " Doctor" 
said he was interested in a laundry that ad- 
vertised to do this, and that to give away the 
secret would injure his business. 



With pleasure I subscribe to your delight- 
ful magazine and inclose herewith $1.00. 
Recreation is one of the cleanest, bright- 
est, handsomest, and in every way, best 
magazines of the day. I wish you the great 
success which your efforts merit. 

[Gen.] Fitz John Porter, 
1 19 West 47th St., New York. 



RECREATION. 



XIX 



SPORTSMEN'S 



Camping & Fishing 

TENTS. 

YACHT AND CANOE SAILS. 



FLAGS AND BURGEES. 

Canvas Covers and Camp Furniture 
of Every Description. 



<j^ 



S, HEMMENWAY & SON 



60 South St., New York City. 

Send 5-cent stamp for our Tent and Flag Catalogue. 



Scovili's 



i? 



NEW WATERBURY 



*f* 



Camera. 



Containing" (new) safety shut- 
ter, view finder, (new) focus- 
ing adjustment, three double 
plate holders. Leather cov- 
ered. All for $15. 4x5 Size. 
Send for complete descrip- 
tive circular to 

• SCOVILL & ADAMS CO., 

423 Broome St., New York. 

For Prices on the best and Most 
Comfortable 

Sleeping Bag 

ever made, write or call on 
S. HEMENWAY & SON, 

60 South St., New York City. 



W 



OMEN WHO TRAVEL 

BETWEEN 

NEW YORK and BOSTON 

WILL FIND IT PAYS TO USE THE 

Norwich Line. 



It is the INSIDE ROUTE, and avoids 
rough water, attendant upon a trip via out- 
side lines. 

One of the fine steamers," City of Lowell," 
new, or "City of Worcester," leaves New 
York, Pier 40, North River, 5.30 p. m., every 
week day, connecting at New London with 
New Vestibuled Steamboat Express Train, 
with Parlor Cars attached, for Boston, Wor- 
cester and points North and East. 

Promenade Concerts on steamers every 
evening. 

Excellent Table d'Hote Dinner served 
on leaving New York at low rate of 75c. 

Staterooms $1.00, $1.50 and S2.00. Berths 
free. 
Ticket Offices, 353 Broadway, 

Pier 40, North River, New York. 

G. W.BRADY, Supt. 

GEO. F. RANDOLPH. Gen'l Traffic Manager. 

W. R. BABCOCK, General Passenger Agent. 

The Wabash Railroad 

Forms an important link with nil lines from the EAST 
to all points WEST, NORTHWEST and S< >U 111- 
WEST. 

The ONLY Through Sleeping Car Line from 

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Leave Boston (Fitchburg R. R. Sta.) daily. 3 p. m, 

All meals served in Dining Cars. 

Through Sleeping Cars from New York and B 
to Chicago leave New York, West Shore R. R., daily 
6p.m. and 8 p.m.; leave Boston, Fitchburg K. K. 
Station daily, 3 p. m. and 7 p. m. 

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and California points made in the NKW UNION 
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For further information in regard l<> I 



apply to 



H. B. McCLELLAN, 
Gen'l Eastern Agent, 



^7 BROADW w. Nl '• Y"KK. 

CHAS. M.HAYS. ' C.S.CRANE. 

Yice-Pres. & Gen'l Mgr. Gen 1 Pass. & I Ickel Apt 

St. Louis, M<> 



XX 



RECREATION. 



PUGET SOUND FISH AND FISH- 
ERIES. 
J. C. Nattrass. 

I was standing on the wharf of Belling- 
ham bay one afternoon recently, watching 
the various forms of fishing and noting the 
varieties of fish being taken, when these 
questions occurred to me : 

Here at my feet lies a body of water 
teeming with life that should furnish food to 
thousands of human beings. Why is it that 
the fishes of Puget sound and its tributaries 
do not furnish a livelihood for thousands of 
people ? True, the present fish industries 
do support a great number of families, but 
not a tenth part of what they should. 

The fisheries of Norway, Newfoundland, 
Nova Scotia, and other similar places, feed 
and clothe vast numbers of people, and 
sustain the commercial life of hundreds of 
cities and villages ; while here the majority 
of the men who fish simply seek to provide 
food for their own tables, while a few oth- 
ers indulge in it merely for the sport. A few 
sell fish to their neighbors or at the local 
markets ; a few boxes of fresh fish are 
shipped away, and a few canneries are in 
operation. The shipments from here to dis- 
tant points realize a neat sum in the aggre- 
gate, but nothing of what they should. The 
industry is in its infancy ; it is* almost unde- 
veloped. The markets are poor. Fisher- 
men find it almost impossible to dispose of 
their fish at the canneries or elsewhere. 
The canneries are not run on systematic 
methods to pay a profit on the investment. 

The six Italians in the two boats anchored 
a few yards from the wharf have just taken 
a ton of mixed smelt and herring from their 
seine at a single haul. Their catch averages 
usually over half a ton to the cast. Surely 
they have a soft snap, and are doing a land- 
office business. Well, hardly ! That one 
haul may have Overstocked the market at a 
cent and a half a pound. An hour's work 
may result in a ton of fish, but a week's 
work is often required to sell them. 

I look down at the water and observe 
that it glistens and sparkles with countless 
thousands of smelt and herring that fill 
it with a silvery sheen. 

At my elbow, and ranged upon each side 
of me, are a dozen men and boys with fish- 
poles and lines, and instead of a hook and 
bait a wire contrivance, of triangular form, 
fastened at intervals with fish-hooks ; these 
they drop down into the water, and drag up 
through the little fish-schools, and snag the 
hooks into one or more fish. This is repeated 
until a mess is obtained. 

Crossing over to a slip I approach two 
large rafts which contain several fishermen. 
Here is a man with a heavy sinker, 
fishing on the bottom of the slip with 
a long line and herring for bait, fishing for 
crabs ; he pulls up one at intervals of every 
10 or 20 minutes. The crabs are large and 
heavy, equal to lobsters. 

Here is a longshoreman, at the crab-catch- 



er's elbow,with a short hand-line of about six 
feet in length, using the same bait, who 
catches nothing but tomcods in the mid- 
depths. He is catching them at the rate of 
a bushel an hour. 

Scattered about the docks are a dozen or 
more men and boys, some fishing with drag- 
hooks for smelt and herring, others with 
bait catching crabs, tomcods, flounders, 
soles, gars and bullheads, indifferently. 

The docks and boats in and about the slip 
are littered with decaying fish of all kinds 
which are indigenous to these waters, and 
thousands of pounds of herring are rotting 
in idle boats. 

Up the beach at some distance a number 
of stooping forms in dingy, faded shawls are 
digging out clams from the tide flats. These 
are the everpresent and happy klootchmen 
(Siwash women). 

The Revenue cutter U. S. Grant, coming 
into the dock for water at this time, drove 
the Italians a little distance away out of 
reach of the wash from the trim craft, where 
they resumed operations. The bell of the 
customs boat rang ( I don't know how many 
bells the marine calls it) half-past three, and 
the writer moved off, but stopped suddenly 
to listen to the weird, sepulchral whistle of 
the Monterey, at anchor half a mile out. 

This is early February. The salmon are 
now passing up the river and being caught 
by the wagon load almost entirely for local 
use. Tons are used for manure by the farm- 
ers, and greater amounts rot on the banks. 

The fresh-water rivers, streams and creeks 
are crowded with salmon on their way to 
spawning grounds every fall, when they are 
destroyed by the ton. Many of these streams 
are filled with obstructions, crossed com- 
pletely by dams without fish ladders, as also 
by fish-traps which prevent the passage of 
a single fish further up-stream. No protec- 
tion is being afforded these noble fish; no aid 
rendered them in their passage to spawning 
grounds ; every hand is against them. The 
end is not far off, although their numbers 
are apparently as large as ever. 

Trout suffer even worse than the salmon. 
Some of the formerly best of resorts for good 
catches are almost depleted. Improvident 
man is, as usual, recklessly destroying what 
a wise Creator has provided for his use. He 
cares nothing for the future. 

Some one of the many fine and suitable 
lakes of Whatcom county,which are now re- 
sorted to by way of the creeks, by the sal- 
mon, for spawning beds, should be appropri- 
ated by the authorities as fish hatcheries. If 
the sportsmen or others interested would 
take proper steps to reach the Fish Commis- 
sioners and have the necessary work done, 
the first step would be taken in the right di- 
rection. Such work and expenditure would 
mean much to the country. 

Laws for protection of fish must be more 
rigidly enforced, and officials who have it in 
their power to punish violators must attend 
strictly to their business. 

[continued on page xxiw] 



RECREA210N. 



X X 1 





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XXII 



RECREATION. 



FOREHAND ARMS CO.'S 
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are plentiful along its lines in Iowa, Minnesota, 
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For fishing — trout, bass, muscollonge, etc., — 
there are numberless streams and lakes in Wisconsin, 
Michigan and the Peninsula of Michigan. 

Send to GEO. H. HEAFFORD, General 
Passenger Agent, Chicago, 111., for free copy of 
Game Laws of the States through which our lines run and for detailed infor- 
mation as to fishing and shooting resorts. 




RECREATION. 



X X 1 1 1 




Having purchased the entire stock of Guns of the 

WILKES=BARRE GUN CO., 

we offer them at the following low prices : 

Hammer Gun, Fine Twist Barrels List, $35.00 ; our price, $17.50 

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Dear Sir : — I have used a Spencer Repeating Shot Gun for eight years. I have fired 

many thousands of shots with it, and it is apparently in as good condition to-day as it was 

when I purchased it. Several years ago a friend of mine, now residing in this city, 51 

by my side and saw me kill six prairie chickens out of a covey that arose simultaneously, 

shooting each bird separately For any kind of shooting from jack snipe I 

the Spencer to any gun I have ever used. 

Yours very truly, J. E. HOUTZ. 



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HERMANN BOKER & CO., 101-103 Duane St., N. Y., \™Z' 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR. 



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XXIV 



RECREATION. 



The: e M. M. BLAKE. 




A Revolving Packet Multiple Loader. 



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6 M. M. Calibers, .236 U. S. Navy, nuzzle Velocity, 2500 ft. 
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Reduced charges or black powder may be used. Also full mantle, half mantle with soft lead points, or all 
lead bullets. The only repeating sporting rifle that will shoot above standard cartridges. Send for free catalogue. 



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Remedy sent postpaid on receipt of $1. Prescribed 
ONLY by Dr. CAMPBELL, SQ2Parkave., BRIDGE- 
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ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY, June 21, 1895. 
I was distracted at times from a noise in my head ; 
your remedy has entirely removed the trouble, for 
which best thanks. 

WALTER VAN DUSEN, Bridgeport, Conn. 

80 BROADWAY, New York, July 3, 1895. 
Your Tinnitus remedy has cured the noises, but I 
feel like keeping on with the treatment, as something 
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Rochester has a municipal law requir- 
ing all bicycles owned there to be registered, 
the fee for which is 50 cents. A license tag 
bearing the number is attached to the han- 
dle bar of the machine. Over 13,000 have 
already been registered. 



As to the commercial value of this indus- 
try, it is somewhat out of the line of Recre- 
ation's regular order of business, but as 
this magazine has an immense circulation 
among all classes, and is showing such a 
vigorous interest in the people and the field 
sports of this state, we hope to attract the 
attention of the press as well as individuals. 

The writer and other sportsmen of the 
state have tried repeatedly to get at the 
readers of the state newspapers through 
their columns. The sportsmen's press, as a 
rule (with one or two exceptions, Recrea- 
tion included in the latter), do not open 
their columns widely to the sportsmen of the 
northwest. 

We are frequently misunderstood in our 
request for space, and wrong motives are im- 
puted. We are not desirous of trying to 
boom a locality, or to decry or run it down; 
nor to gain personal notoriety ; we simply 
see a danger ahead, and are willing to use 
what feeble strength we may have to avert 
it. We see undeveloped wealth, and wish 
to call attention to it, having no personal axe 
to grind. We simply wish to improve our fel- 
low man's condition. 

Some of us are sick to death of appearing 
constantly on the same strain for perpet- 
uation of species, but there's nothing like 
"keeping everlastingly at it." 



RECREATION. 



X X V 



FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF. 




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XXVI 



RECREATION. 



¥ ALLEY, An art book of North- 
PIjAIN western scenes, from photo- 
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book contains more useful and interesting 
m^ter and artistic beauty than art publica- 
tions often selling for a dollar or more. Ad- 
dress F. I. Whitney, G. P. and T. A., Great 
Northern Railway, §t. Paul, Minn. 

(Mention this Paper.) 15-A. 




Send for Hunting and Fishing Bulletins. 




ATLAS 



NORTHWEST. 



AN Contains complete 

maps of the U. S., Min- 
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Montana, Idaho and 
Washington, showing post 
offices to June ist, 1894, 
with every geographical and topographical 
feature brought down to date, and printed in 
the highest style of the map maker's art. In- 
teresting descriptive, historical and statistical 
information appears with each map. Send 15 
cents for postage to F. I. Whitney, G. P. & 
T. A., Gt. Northern Railway, St. Paul, Minn. 
(Mention this Paper.) 15-B 



W-A 



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RECREATION. 



XXVII 




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XXV111 



RECREATION. 



NEAR BY LANOKA. 

I had just said goodbye to my friends, 
Will L. and Al. H. and young son Davy, 
who were more lucky than I was, and who 
were going to tarry a while longer on the 
bay and enjoy the good fishing and shooting, 
and as I settled down in the smoker and 
pulled out the August number of Recre- 
ation I heaved a sigh to see the little 
station glide quickly by while the scrub-oaks 
and pines began chasing one another rapidly 
to the southward. All this reminded me 
that after a pleasant and profitable week, as 
evidenced by the well filled basket of weak- 
fish and pickerel, on ice and moss, I 
should soon be back to hear the rattle of 
wheels and scuffle of hurrying heels rise 
to the office windows. 

I reflectively pulled on one of Host Hun- 
gerford's two-for-a-quarter's, having just 
enjoyed a breakfast of berries, omelet, blue- 
fish, fried potatoes, steak, oatmeal and coffee 
with a fisherman's appetite, and I concluded 
that this was not a trip on which a large 
amount of disgust and cash had to be 
" charged to experience, " as the best and 
most generous shooting companion Lever 
knew, would sometimes put it. 

With Recreation before me, it also oc- 
curred that a brief report was the proper 
thing, inasmuch as it was through the kind- 
ness of one of its subscriber^ that I took the 
trip, and that may be a word or two would 
enable some one else to do as well. 

Except that the surrounding country is 
more of nature and less of man, Lanoka is 
pretty much like the rest of the towns in 
Ocean county, N. J., along the Central rail- 
road, only the station is not far from the 
the hotel, and the hotel is not far from the 
pine-bordered creek where the boats land. 
This creek shortly widens out into Barnegat 
Bay. One of the principal attractions, how- 
ever, was our host. He is a jolly good fel- 
low, a thorough sportsman, and knowing 
just what is required, will always provide it 
or bust. For instance, if he says breakfast 
will be ready at 5, we sit down at just 60 
minutes past four, exactly. It seems that 
our boniface went down there not long ago 
on a shooting trip, and liked the place so 
well that he cut lose from the city, and then 
and there opened a hotel. 

I will have to finish as briefly as possi- 
ble, Mr. Coquina, or you will think I have 
an axe to grind ; but allow me to recount 
that we took fine strings of weakfish, blue- 
fish and kingfish. Young Davy was "high- 
hook," and within a few yards of the hotel, 
just before train-time, we took a nice mess 
of from one to two pound pickerel to take 
home. There is a pond a mile or two from 
the hotel that the boys fished after I left, 
and they reported great luck with the last 
named. We kicked up quite a few quail 
near the hotel, and from its porch heard the 
ruffed grouse thumping himself with his 
wings to keep the mosquitoes away ; though 
some of the knowing ones insisted that the 



bird was whistling through his teeth. The 
weather was not propitious, but we did 
fairly well with the yellow legs, and if I get 
down next month for bay-birds, you may 
hear from 

Phil. O'Hela. 



Reports from this section are badly mixed. 
We have not seen an Indian for two weeks. 
I think it is true that several hundred war- 
riors were out to do us up. We know of 
their scouts having passed through the Hole 
at night, but we had 90 good men in a body 
and there is no telling what was averted by 
being ready for them. The last reports say 
the Indians are going back to their reserva- 
tions. That is what we are afraid of. When 
things are settled what is to prevent their 
leaving again, quietly, and catching us un- 
prepared. There are four companies of 
troops here in the Hole, several companies 
in the Teton basin and more coming up 
Green river ; and no Indians to be found. 
I have just returned from a seven days' 
scout in the country east of Jackson's Lake. 
Saw no Indians nor any fresh sign. Found 
plenty of game and it was very tame, show- 
ing that it has not been molested so much as 
usual this summer. In the country just 
southeast of here, where in June there were 
many Indians and dead elk lying all around, 
with not a live one to be seen, a week ago 
some of the scouts saw 200 elk in one day. 
S. N. Leek, Marysvale, Wyo. 



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TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

Two yearly subscriptions to RECREATION 

each, I will give a copy of " Hunting in the < I 

West ;" paper. 
Three subscriptions at $i each, a copy of " The 1 

of the Big Hole; 7 ' cloth. 
Four subscriptions at Si each, a cop\ aping 

and Camp Outfits;'' cloth. 
Five subscriptions at $i each, a i opj ol " Cru 

the Cascades ;" cloth. 
Six subscriptions at $i each, a copi I "Ami 

Game Fishes ;" cloth. 
Seven subscriptions at $i each, a copy of "Tl 

Game of North America," or of " Hie Am< 

Book of the Dog ;" cloth. 
Ten subscriptions at $i each. a single shot Rifieworth 

$10, or a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod worth f 10. 
Fifteen subscriptions at %\ each, a 

loading Shot Gun worth m- 
Twenty-five subscriptions a1 i\ each, a double I 

breech loading Shot Gun worth I 

Thirty-five subscriptions at %\ eai h.a d i ll • 
hammerless breech loading Shot Gunwi 

Seventy-five subscriptions at tl - ., h,i 
worth. $75- 

These Guns and Hi- WW, and wi 

shipped direct from factor Pnc 
at which manufacturers sell Hen 
to get a book, a gun or a 
offers relate onlv to sub! 
after, and not to such as may already 1 



RECREATION, 136 West 24th St., New York. 



XXX 



RECREATION. 




THE SANDOW BICYCLE LOCK, 

STRONG, SHALL AND SECURE. 

Attachable to the Chain and Sprocket Wheel. 

50 CENTS. 

THIEF PROOF. EASILY ADJUSTED . 

The Sandowis the only bicycle lock which fills along felt want 
among bicycle riders, because it is thief proof and can De carried 
in the tool bag or vest pocket, with key attachable to key chain. 

A mystery to unlock until shown how. Cannot be picked open 
or cut. 

SOLD BY ALL BICYCLE DEALERS, 

or sent to any address on receipt of 50 cents. Send for complete 
catalogue of Cyclometers, Star Lamp Brackets, etc. 

The Bridgeport Gun Implement Co., 

313 & 315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



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Loaded with Smokeless Powder. 



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^0^- 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 

the UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



R EC RE A TION. 



Accurate Shooting 

CAN ONLY BE DONE WITH A PERFECT GUN. 




The Remington Hammerless 

Is the finest ^un made in America, and is not excelled by 
: m ported arm . 




All crades Have 



Damascus Barrels, 
English Walnut Stock, 
Case-Hardened Frame and 

Mountings, 
Automatic Safety, 



Purdy Fore-End Snap. 

Triple Bolt, 

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Extension Rib with Bit-. 

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AUTOMATIC EJECTING. 
NON-A UTOMA TTC EJECTING. 



F»rice $45.()() .'m<l Upward, 



The Remington Arms Co 

ILIOKT, INT. "5T. 

New York Office, 315 Broadway, New York CM 

i landsomely Illustrated Catalogue for 1S95 sent to any address free of ch 



RECREA TION. 



CIJ lNCHESTER 



(a 



. . . . model 1894 



30 CAL. SMOKELESS CARTRIDGE. 




LIST PRICE, 
$38 PER M. 



Using a New Smokeless Powder— Metal Patched Bullet. 



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We are now prepared to furnish MODEL 1894 Rifles taking the new .30- 
caliber Winchester Smokeless Cartridge. For the present they will be made 
only with 26 in. round (nickel steel) barrel, list price $23. Take-Down Rifles, $28. 



Winchester Repeating Arms Co 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Send for 112-page Catalogue. 



SIMPSON * LYALL PRESS, 136 & 138 WEST 24th STREET, NEW YORK. 



VOLUME III. 
NUMBER 4. 




"IN THE STUBBLE." 

COPYRIGHT BY BERLIN PM TOGRAPMIC CO Nl* 



G> 0. SHIELDS (Coquina., 19 w 2 4th St. N N 




RECREATION. 



A 

R 
K 

E 
R 



arker guns can always be found, 
articularly where sportsmen abound. 

11 lovers of guns their merits admit, 
nd if held right they're sure to hit. 

ibs are made by our special machine, 
eason their lines is so readily seen. 

ings patents are used, doing away with all bothers, 
eeping up to date, and ahead of all others. 

very gun tested and guaranteed right, 
ach part well adjusted and perfectly tight. 

ebounding locks and safety device, 
emarkably strong, and of medium price. 



Q 

u 

N 



uns of all sizes and weights are supplied ; 
uns that win prizes wherever they're tried. 

niform care throughout their construction ; 
ncle Sam's product, — an American production. 

o superior made ; no matter what price, 
ever "miss fire" — don't have to pull twice. 



Write for Catalogue. 



New York Salesroom, 

96 Chambers Street. 



PARKER BROTHERS 



MERIDEN, 
CONN. 



SCOTT'S MONTE CARLO 

LATEST AUTOMATIC EJECTOR HAMMERLESS. 



Also Westley Richards, 
Greener, Purdey, 
Lang, Colt, 
Parker, &c. 



We have these with 

ordinary style 

stock, or with 

special stock. 




OTHER GUNS TAKEN IN TRADE. 

The fact that the Scott gun has again taken the Grand Prize at | ^^ f^Z*^ X^ St™ 

Monte Carlo, this time for 800 pounds sterling, with Object of Art, shot • Second-Hand Gun*. Al«o or fln« 
for by ninety-three competitors, speaks volumes in its praise. | Fishing Tackle. 

AGENTS: WM. READ & SONS, 107 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



RECREATION. 

Copyright, May, 1895, by G. O. Shields. 
A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything that^he Name Implies. 



Si.oo A Year, 

10 Cents A Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



[0. WES1 2\ 1 II S I KM I . 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER. 

"And Here Came Two Bucks, Lickety-Split," Yin >vi isi 

A Deer Drive with Spokane Indians. Illustrated. Lieut. W. R. Abercrombie. 

An Indian Horse Race Maj. F. M. Bernard. 

The Chase. (Poem.) Emma Carle ion. 

The Old Kentucky Rifle. (Poem.) Illustrated Capt. J. W. Crawford. 

An Outing on the Pesthigo. Illustrated Frank K. Root. 

A Mystery of the Tetons. Illustrated Ed. H. I km 1 < >v 

The Sportsman's Song. (Poem.) Dr. L. E. Holmes. 

Shooting in the Northwest. Illustrated Jami.s K. BOYD. 

A Toast. (Poem.) Jessie Forsyth ( i i\i . 

Guatemotzin, a Tale of the Aztecs Dr. J. E. Tucker. 

A Trapped Sensation. Illustrated Frances Webster. 

How I Got My First Deer Mrs. A. G. Wali.iii an. 



Editor's Corner 
Possible Smiles 
Bicycling 



195 
193 
197 



Fish and Fishing 

Amateur Photography. . 
Publisher's Department. 



Page 

11 1 1 

61 
65 

7o 

Si 

200 
194 



Entered as Second Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17th, 1894. 



OUR 1894 MODEL. 

The New Ideal Rifle. 





Send for Catalogue. 



JMade for 22, 25, 32 and 38 rim fire or center 
fire cartridges, as ordered. Can be dis- 
mounted and assembled in a few seconds. Can 
be carried in a trunk or short gun case. S 
frame and drop lever action similar to that of the 
Ballard rifle. 

All styles of Stevens' Rifles and 
Pistols in stock. 




5 shots, 25 yards off- 
hand, with No. 2 Rifle. 
22-cal. 



J. Stevens' Arms and Tool Co. 

p. 0. box m, 

chicopee Falls, Mass 
U. S A. 




5 shots. 4i> v:ir<lM off- 
hand, with No. 1 Kifle. 
82-cal 



PRINTED BY SIMPSON 4 LYALL PRESS, 136 & 138*WEST 24th STREET, NEW YORK. 



11 



RECREATION. 




THE 



BRISTOL 



STEEL ROD 



Lands anything that hitches on to it. 



THE BRISTOL 



Isjndestructible. It is more springy, easier to handle, neater in appearance and lighter 
for its weight than any wood rod is or ever will be. 

Fifteen sizes, styles and weights. Sold by all first-class dealers. 
40-page catalogue free. 

THE HORTON MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

BRISTOL, CONN. 



Mutual Reserve Fund Life Association. 

E. B. HARPER, PRESIDENT. 

$40,000,000 Saved in Premiums. 

The Mutual Reserve, by reducing the rates to 
harmonize with the payments to widows and or- 
phans, has already saved its policy-holders more 
than Forty Million Dollars in premiums. 




1881. 



1895. 



THE ELOQUENCE OF RESULTS. 

No. of Policies in force, over 98,000 

Interest Income, annually exceeds $135,000 

Bi-Monthly Income exceeds $750,000 

Reserve Emergency Fund exceeds $3,860,000 

Death Claims paid, over $21,000,000 

New Business received in 1894 exceeded $81,000,000 

Total Insurance in force $300,000,000 



60 



The total cost for the past fourteen years, for g% ^^ 

$! 0,000 insurance in the Mutual Reserve l^kll 

amounts to less than Old System Companies ^^ ^^ 

D n OM i charge for $4,500 at ordinary life rates— a n a|( n QH | 

iCl UGHi. saving, in premiums, which is equal to a cash rCI UGHI, 

1 dividend of nearly 60 per cent. *^_^^_ 



40 



MUTUAL RESERVE BUILDING. 

MILLION DOLLARS 
SAVED IN PREMIUMS 



40 



The Mutual Reserve, by reducing 
the rates to harmonize with the payments to 
widows and orphans, has already saved its 
policy-holders more than Forty Million Dollars 
in Premiums. 



EXCELLENT POSITIONS OPEN in its Agencj 
Department in every Town, City and State to experienced 
and successful business men, who will find the Mutual Re- 
serve the very best Association they can 
work for. 

HOME OFFICE : 

MUTUAL RESERVE BUILDING, 

Cor Broadway & Duane St., New York. 



RECREATION. 



in 



DOGS BOARDED, 





WITHIN EASY DISTANCE OF NEW YORK 



Have been thoroughly reorganized (and in the near future 

will be much enlarged). 



Resident Manager, W. H. MACKAY. 

Consulting Veterinarian, T. G. SHERWOOD, M. R. C. V. S. 

These Kennels are now under the direct supervision of our Show Superintendent, Mr. E. M 

OLDHAM, President American Spaniel Club, etc., etc. 



DOGS BOARDED, NURSED, PREPARED FOR SHOWS, ETC. 



Send for particulars and free pamphlets on Dog Diseases, to 

SPRATTS PATENT, LTD., 

245 EAST 56th STREET, NEW YORK CITY. 

E. I. DUPONT de NEMOURS & CO. 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Smokeless Powder. 

The Safest, Strongest, Quickest and Cleanest Nitro Powder in the world. 
Less Smoke than any other Nitro. Will not Pit or Rust the barrels. 

High Velocity with Moderate Pressure. Close and Even Pattern, with 
Great Penetration. The Nitro for which Sportsmen have been waiting. 



SEND TO US FOR PRICE-LIST WITH DIRECTIONS FOR LOADING. 



E. S. RICE, ... 62 Wabash Avenue, 

Chicago. 
WM. McBLAIR, - 509 North Third Street, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
R. S. WADDELL, - 45 "West Second Street, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
FRED. J. WADDELL, Cor. 8th & Chestnut Sts., 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
L. C. THORNHILL, - 54 Gravier Street, 

New Orleans, La. 

D. W. C. BIDWELL & CO., - 143 Water St., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



OR TO 

CLINTON BIDWELL, - 14 West Swan St., 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
SHOEMAKER & VOUTE, 126 South Del. Ave. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
H. P. COLLINS, - 22 South Calvert Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 
ARTHUR HYNDMAN, - - 32 Pine Street, 

New York. 
GEO. E. SMITH & CO., - 7 Central Wharf, 

Boston, Mass. 

S. C. MADDEN, - 1310 Eighteenth Street, 

Denver, Col. 



C. A. HAIGHT, 226 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



IV 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES. 



<*5,0^>»- 



To Any Person Sending fie 



Two Yearly subscriptions to RECREA- 
TION at $1 each, I will give a copy of 
*' Hunting in the Great West ;" paper. 

Three subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
u The Battle of the Big Hole ;" cloth. 

Four subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
" Camping and Camping Outfits ;" cloth. 

Five subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
u Cruising in the Cascades ;" cloth. 

Six subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
" American Game Fishes.;" cloth. 

Seven subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
"The Big Game of North America," or of 
" The American Book of the Dog ;" cloth. 



Ten Subscriptions at $1 each, a Daven- 
port single shot Rifle worth $10, or a Bris- 
tol Steel Fishing Rod worth $10. 

Fifteen Subscriptions at $1 each, a Dav- 
enport single-barrel breech-loading Shot 
Gun worth $15. 

Twenty-five subscriptions at $1 each, a 
double-barrel breech-loading Shot Gun 

worth $25. 

Thirty-five subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Forehand double-barrel hammerless breech- 
loading Shot Gun worth $35. 

Seventy-five subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Monarch Safety Bicycle worth $100. 



■^O^fc-- 



These Guns and Bicycles are new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at which man- 
ufacturers sell. Here is a good chance to 

Get a Book, a Gun, a Rod, or a Bicycle, Free of Cost. 

These offers apply only to subscriptions to be sentj in 
hereafter, and not to such as may already have been sent. 



o<^- 



RECREATION, 



1© West 24th St., New York 



RECREATION. 



Model 1893. MARLIN. 




Rifle with 26-inch octagon, 
l /> octagon or round barrel. 
$23.00, list. 

Barrel, Receiver and Action made of steel warranted and guaranteed 
to the U. S. Government test as applied to materials for Krag 
Jorgensen rifle. 

38-55- Smokeless cartridges 
with metal patched or mush- 
room bullets. 
All Lengths and Styles, Regular and TAKE-DOWN. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

THE MARLIN FIRE ARH5 CO., 

INI^na/ [-\si\/^m, Conn. 

Send 15 cents and we will mail a park of highest quality playing cards, special des 




For Shooting and Fishing . . . 

T""*RY the territory traversed by the lines of the 

tew*/ Chicago, Hilwaukee and 

St. Paul Railway. 

Some of the best deer shooting In the country is 

to be had in Northern Wisconsin and the Peninsula 
of Michigan. 

Prairie chickens, ducks, geese, partridge, etc., 
are plentiful along its lines in Iowa, Minnesota, 
South Dakota and North Dakota. 

For fishing — trout, bass, muscollonge, etc., — 
there are numberless streams and lakes in Wisconsin, 
Michigan and the Peninsula of Michigan. 

Send to GEO. H. HEAFFORD, General 
Passenger Agent, Chicago, 111., for free copy 
Game Laws of the States through which our lines run and for detailed infor- 
mation as to fishinnf and shooting resorts. 




VI 



RECREATION. 




Athletic Goods 

Represent the standard of excellence. 

Honestly made of the finest materials. 



Zhe IDtctor Xeaoue Ball 

Is a favorite among ball-players. 

Zhe IDtctor tennis Ball 

Is the best and most durable ball on the market. 



OVERHAN WHEEL CO., 

Makers of Victor Bicycles, 

Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Boston. New York. Detroit. Denver. Pacific Coast : San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland 




> o 



< 

w 

PS 

w 

X 
G 

z 

< 



RECREATION. 



Volume HI. OCTOBER, 1895. Number 4. 

G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 

The American News Co., Agents for the U. S. and Canada. The International News I ral 

Agents for Europe. Offices: Beams Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, E. C, Eng- 
land; Stephanstrasse 18, Leipzig, Germany. 



A DEER DRIVE WITH SPOKANE INDIANS. 

Lieut. W. R. Abercrombie, U. S. A. 

4 i TACK'.JACK! nika nanich mica- thawing out their leggings and moc- 

| hiac-hyos cold." (Jack I want casins before a roaring fire. At grey 

^ to see you, andhurry, it's cold.) dawn I was awakened by having the 

It was about two o'clock one bitter blankets and buffalo robes pulled off 

January morning, in 1882, while in me. This was an intimation that it 

cantonement at what is now known as was time to clat-a-wah (go); so 

Fort Spokane, Washington, that my after swallowing some hot coffee, 

friend, the sub-chief of the Spokane bacon, and frying-pan bread, I found 

Indians, Or-ah-pah-eu, came to my my way through the darkness and 

cabin to notify me that a bunch of falling snow to a little shack 1 had 

black tail deer, were corralled in a built, back of my cabin, where I kept 

creek bottom near his lodge about my horses and hunting outfit. ( )n 

12 miles from our station, and my saddle horse " Stubbie," a thick- 

that the Indians were out for their set, short-legged, roan, half-bred 

annual hunt. From the scraps of cayuse — and a dandy to break trail 

conversation I caught as Or and I packed my Whitman saddle, 250 

his companions unsaddled and rounds service ammunition, an extra 

brought their traps into the cabin, heavy mission blanket, some burnt 

I learned that the snow was still fall- cork matches in a water-tight box 

ing and about 18 inches deep. (made of two empty cartridge 

After they had struck a light, started shells), a pair of bottles, my rifle, 
fire, and put on a pot for " muck- my hunting knives, a chopper and 
a-muck" (something to eat), I sat skinner, two pairs of woolen socks, 
up in my buffalo robes and listened and two pairs of heavy moccasins. 
to their plans for the hunt. They For my mare, Bess, 1 had a corn- 
had left a temporary camp, about plete Indian pack, consisting oi two 
four miles up the Spokane, where raw-hide bags 2y 2 by 2 feel with 
they had a " dug-out" to ferry over a flap, and loops on top to hang on 
our " pack-outfits; " and we had best the cross tree of the pack' saddle, 
leave within a few hours before a These bags were filled with commis- 
possible thaw and freeze, for it saries. The sacks werean invention ol 
would then be impossible for us to the Hudson Bay Company, raw hide 
get over the divide between the being the only material tough enough 
Spokane river and the Ins-tah- to protect the green and red br 
peats-ah creek, where we hoped to cloth they carried over the moun- 
get our shooting. A deer very sel- tains from the thorn brush and sharp 
dom moves about during a snow edges of the rocks along the trail. 
storm and as the bunch in question On top of the pack came the coffee- 
had been spotted, it was only a mat- pot, frying pan, liquid snake medi- 
ter of hard riding to get over the cine, and a small short-handled ax 
divide before a crust should form, encased in a leather cover. 

The last impression I had before All being ready we laid ourcoi 

falling asleep was of the Indians for the "traders' store" where we 

[53 



154 



RECREATION. 



were to pick up the rest of our party, 
and this was no easy job, for the 
snow was falling thick around us. 
We knew the location of several big 
pine trees relative to our road, and 
as there was no wind the snow fell 
on the ground evenly, leaving what 
is known as a " blind trail," which 
with great care on the part of the 
trailer can be followed. 

It is customary for the chief to start 
out on the trail afoot, following the de- 
pression with his eye if light enough, 
and if not, with his bare hand in the 
snow. After the first half hour if 
his hand does not freeze it becomes 
warm and comfortable. He also 
feels for the sides of the path with 
his feet. This is slow work, if alone, 
and to increase the speed the chief 
has two followers, each walking 
twenty paces behind the other, and 
behind them come the horses and 
hunters. All three try to keep the 
trail, but should the first lose it he 
calls out " lost," and waits till the 
second and third have passed on 
when he takes the place of No. 3. 

If No. 1 is found off, No. 2 claims 
first place. The buck who can hang 
to the trail on a stormy night or 
day without losing his position, is 
regarded in much the same light as 
is the captain of a successful foot- 
ball team in the east. 

After plodding along for about an 
hour, in the the most oppressive si- 
lence you can imagine, broken only 
by an occasional " lost " from the 
trailers, as they silently filed past 
each other, a black mass ahead of 
us turned into the traders' store, 
and from out of the storm came the 
cabalistic word "skookum" (all's 
well). We knew it was from friends 
in the lead although we could not 
seethem. On we plodded, until finally 
we came to the edge of a deep canyon 
and heard the rush of a small creek. 
Down we went until we saw a black 
line that looked about as broad as 
my hand. This was the running 
water in the bottom of the canyon. 
We halted and arranged our packs 
for the climb. The opposite wall 
was almost perpendicular, but some 



hard work on the part of our horses 
and great care on our part landed 
us on the top of it in due time. 

Then we heard dogs barking and 
soon saw the Indian camp across the 
Spokane river. The stock was un- 
saddled and our packs ferried over 
in the " dug-out." Stubbie swam like 
a duck, but the mare is ugly in cold 
water and by the look of her eye I 
knew she meant to give us trouble, 
so I swam Stubbie with the Indian 
ponies and lead the mare from the 
u dug-out." She went in up to her 
belly and then squared for a plunge. 
I called out to the squaw : 

"Close nanich " (look out); tried 
to ward off the blow, but was too 
late. The mare hit the side of the 
canoe and half filled it with water. One 
of the squaws went overboard with me. 
Cold! Great Scott! how cold the 
water was, as I sat in it holding Bess 
by the head. " Musa quash!" (pad- 
dle hard) I yelled, and the " lady " 
in the bow of the canoe made the 
water boil with her paddle, while the 
one in the water, swimming as only 
a squaw can swim, pushed the canoe 
to the farther shore, a distance of 
20 yards. 

I gave the halter-shank to the 
young squaw, who lead Bess up to 
the lodge of Lot, chief of the 
Spokanes, whose hunting party we 
had now joined. I followed, stepped 
into one of the old buffalo-skin lodges 
of the plains Indian, and found my 
friend Sherwood who had joined us 
at the traders' store. 

Sherwood is a character peculiar to 
the frontier. He had been with Gen- 
eral Scott's army to the city of 
Mexico, with Walker to Nicaragua 
as a filibuster, and later became 
assistant engineer in the United 
States Navy, which he left because 
his ship was to winter at Mare Is- 
land, San Francisco, and six months 
in one place would bring no excite- 
ment with it. The " gold rush " to 
the upper Columbia river was then 
on, so my friend invested in a burro 
and started north, traveling from 
tribe to tribe, learning the language 
of each and gaining the respect and 



A DEER DRIVE WITH SPOKANE INDIANS. 



i ? 



53 



T 



IT 






\\ 




m 



BREAKING TRAIL TO OR-AH-PAH-EU S LODGE. 



good will of all. At that time he 
owned the traders' store before men- 
tioned. He was one of a type of 
men who began to vanish when 
the iron horse that breathes fire 
packed it's first load across the 
Rockies. 

Sherwood, a corporal of my regi- 
ment, and myself were the only white 
men of the council. As I entered 
Or-ah-pah-eu motioned me to a seat 
at Lot's right, next Sherwood. My 
coming completed the circle. All sat 
erect in perfect silence, as if cut out 
of stone. 

Lot took up his pipe and filling it 
from a pouch hung from his neck, 
began the " wa-wa " (talk). Making 
a map on the ground with his knife, 
he snowed the trail we were to fol- 
low to reach the hunting grounds, 
and welcomed and advised us in a 
few words. He said, Lot's heart was 
glad when he saw us, for we were 
good shots and would kill a great 



many deer over on Ins-tah-peats-ah 
creek where there was a large band 
which his young men had hern 
watching; that we must be careful in 
shooting not to miss any, and that 
his young men and women would 
pack the carcasses back' to the main 
camp. They had been breaking 
trail for us, up the divide, all night. 
We had better start right out. The 
trail lead up a sharp foot-hill over 
a mesa through pine timber and 
sage brush, then up a gulch to a di- 
vide about 3,000 feet high, which 
was comparatively easy traveling, as 
the bucks and squaws had k< 
moving all night to keep it open. 
On reaching the summit, where the 
snow was about six feet deep, we cut 
some green boughs which we laid 
on the snow, and gathering some 
fagots from a standing dead pine, 
built a fire and made coffee, as it 
was now well along in the afternoon. 
After fortifying ourselves with 



i 5 6 



RECREATION. 



fried bacon and hard tack we pre- 
pared to break trail down to Or-ah- 
pah-eu's lodge. Giving our guns to 
the cutters (ordinary) bucks, we 
tied our stirrups over our horse's 
backs and took off their bridles so 
they would not get tangled up when 
floundering and wallowing in the 
snow. Then we put on our snow-shoes 
and broke the snow for a hundred 
yards or so. Returning, we mounted 
our horses, my grey leading. How 
the snow flew, and how he puffed! 
It had grown cold, and the steam 
went up from our horses in a col- 
umn. When the descent became 
more marked, my horse would go 
io or 15 feet at each jump. The 
sensations were peculiar. He would 
paw and wallow until he could get a 
footing, then he would make a leap 
and slide 20 or 30 feet, the snow 
over his back. Sometimes he would 
throw me on the snow in front of 
him so that we would face each other; 
then with a quick movement I would 
pull myself up on his back again. 

Finally about dark we made the 
lodge, dead beat, our horse's flanks 
crusted with frozen sweat and snow, 
and our moccasins in about the same 
condition. How good it felt to lie 
down in the lodge and watch the fire 
burn. Not a sound is heard, for the 
Indians are too tired to cook or talk. 
It was one of the toughest days I 
have ever experienced, snow-shoeing 
in Alaska not excepted. 

About four a. m., Or-ah-pah-eu 
awakened me, saying: "Not good 
sleep too long after such hard tramp- 
ing, legs get sore." 

Then the cooking began, accom- 
panied with a few Indian stories of 
hunts and fights. Each man cooked 
his bit of grub on a stick before the 
fire, telling his story meanwhile. 
This kept the entire party moving, 
at intervals, the rest of the night, 
which is "good medicine" to keep 
from getting sore muscles. 

Starting out next morning at e-lip- 
sun(grey dawn), we made a bee-line 
for the confluence of the two creeks, 
which we reached about two hours 
after sunrise. The creek bottom was 



covered with a thick chaparal, wkh 
here and there a clear place. Or- 
ah-pah-eu posted us along the creek, 
one to each of these clearings, with 
the warning "close nanich" (look 
out). The banks were about 150 feet 
high, anel the snow about three feet 
deep. 

Above we could hear the Indian 
boys as they came down the canyon 
wading in the creek and driving the 
deer our way. My hands were cold 
from carrying my gun. I leaned it 
against a tree and put my hands 
under my buckskin shirt to warm 
my fingers a bit. As I stood thus I 
heard a splash in the creek, and be- 
fore I could get my rifle to my 
shoulder a big five-year-old buck 
shot past. I squared myself and 
here came two bucks lickety-split. 
I nailed the leader in the head and 
missed the second; then came five. 
I got two of these and jammed a 
cartridge in my gun. While thus dis- 
abled seven or eight went by. By 
this time we were all red hot. The 
hunters below me made the woods 
ring as they pumped the lead into 
the fleeing deer; and the Indians 
above, hearing the fusilade, howled, 
yelled, and came wallowing 
through the deep snow as fast as 
they could. The perspiration ran 
from my face in streams, and the 
smoke hung in front of me in a 
cloud. This kept up for 15 min- 
utes, and that drive was over. 

The Indians came into the clearing, 
steaming in the cold morning air, 
wet to the arm-pits, the upper por- 
tion of their shirts covered with 
ice. As soon as they had inspected 
the 14 deer I had killed they 
started for camp to dry off, while 
the squaws, who had followed 
with pack horses, began to skin and 
cut up the carcasses. I dropped 
down to see what luck the others 
had, and counted 37 mule deer in 
and along the creek as a result 
of the drive, none of which 
would weigh less than 150 pounds. 

Slaughter? Well, yes; but this 
was the way the Indians got their 
meat in those days, and I was only 



AN INDIAN HORSE RACE. , ;; 

a figure in the affair. If I had not never forget and am glad I accepted 

been there the Indians would have Or-au-pah eu's invitation. But such 

done the shooting. I merely helped scenes will never again be enacted, 

them out and saved them a few car- and the only shooting we do now Ls 

tridges. I had an experience I shall in theory— in the Officers' Lyceum. 



AN INDIAN HORSE RACE. 

Maj. F. M. Bernard. 

It happened at the Agency when refusal. Howling Bull then appeared 

Troop O was over there, escorting and used his eloquence at first with- 

from the fort a delegation from the out avail ; but later, when he hint< d 

Society for the Amelioration of the that he might be able to recover the 

Condition, and the Protection from stolen steed, the Captain relented. 

Imposition, of the Plains Indians. He knew of this Indian's expertness 

The Agency butcher, Beckett, told in the science of horse-transference 

Farrier Lipbrown, of Troop O, that and that he could probably make 

Howling Bull, a young chief, was good his hint. 

anxious to match his American The excitement over the race was 
horse, Tegante (popularly believed great. Both horses were well known, 
to be a part of the spoils of last and, it was thought, evenly matched. 
year's raid on the horse ranches near Lipbrown and Beckett had exclusive 
the railroad), against the Troop's information, acquired in dark and 
running horse, Ossian, and proposed devious ways unknown to the Indian. 
making a race. The farrier doubted They had a certainty, plunged hero- 
if it could be done, because, during ically, taking everything the whites 
the march over, a party of Crow In- at the Agency could be induced to 
dians that camped near the Troop put on Tegante. The Indians were 
one night had run off several horses, moneyless, but they freely staked 
including the captain's own, one of ponies, furs, etc., against the luxuries 
the fastest in that part of the west, of the trader's store. Howling Hull. 
This had naturally enraged him a fine specimen of his race, had been 
against all Indians and their doings, educated at a Jesuit college near 
Beckett persisted ; showed how such St. Louis, and had returned to his 
an opportunity for getting the best people as a leaven ot civilization. 
of the guileless red man might never But the leaven did not work. ( >nce 
occur again; that it was too good a back in a lodge with a blanket on 
chance of doing him to be lost. his head he was a savage again in 
Howling Bull was Beckett's broth- spite of 20 years of teaching. A 
er-in-law, so he could get all the in- knowing savage, however, his school- 
side information about the other ing was not entirely thrown away. It 
horse; and with this, added to the helped to make him a man of note- 
other advantages he possessed, it in his tribe, and gave him a knowl- 
would be odd if the race didn't go edge of the manners, habits, and cus- 
our way. In fact, he put the matter toms of the white man which his 
so forcibly and favorably that Lip- brothers did not possess. He learned 
brown agreed to speak to the First one lesson in the St. Pom's school he 
Sergeant about it. The First Ser- did not forget. That was the value 
geant, when he proposed the match of money, and he always had a tidy 
to the Captain, met with a profane sum stowed away somewhere. I his 



158 



RECREATION. 





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AN INDIAN HORSE RA CE. 1 59 

wad was, in this instance, the white horse. Lipbrown, in an improvised 

man's point of attack. It was the jockey suit, nervous and excited, 

real stake, the ostensible one being stood at Ossian's head, conversing in 

three ponies against a steer. low tones with Beckett. The crowd 

For a time Howling Bull would at the starting place— mostly white 
not bet money. He declared he had soldiers — was beginning to chaff the 
none so persistently that it required two managers, when the Indian 
all of his brother-in-law's persuasive dashed up, placing his horse beside 
powers to induce him to finally pro- the other. The rider was entirely 
duce the roll. When it came it was naked, except as to a breech clout 
found to be much larger than the and a few beaded and porcupine- 
others imagined it would be, and quilled ornaments about his head 
they had to scratch around pretty and neek. His face, painted in the 
lively to cover it. If the race went highest style of Indian art, glistened 
against them neither would touch a in the strong sunlight as if it was 
cent of pay for over a year. The or- varnished, giving him an uncanny 
ders for it were in the trader's safe. look. 

Lipbrown, who handled the Troop His horse was about as much 
horse, had been a hanger-on about dressed as the rider was undressed. 
English racing stables previous to Strips of beaded and colored buck- 
embracing a military career, and had, skin were braided in with his tail 
he said, ridden in the great races, and mane ; his face was painted 
True to his training he enveloped his bright yellow, with a border of white; 
preparations for the race with New- his hoofs and legs, half way up 
market secrecy and mystery. Howl- to his knees, were blaek, while over 
ing Bull was as open as the other was his sides and quarters marks as <>i 
close. Tegante remained with the blood-red hands were scattered. A 
herd and, as far as one could see, was blanket, fastened on by a surcingle, 
not handled at all. and an elaborately fringed and oth- 

The course was from a point near erwise ornamented headstall com- 

the stockade across the plain to and pleted his toilet. Taken altogether, 

around a low hill, and back to the the pair did not look like man and 

starting point — about two miles. As horse, but like the creatures of a 

the hour for the race drew near, the nightmare. 

plain about the course was well cov- Howling Bull beckoned to a boy 
ered with Indian men, women, and of about 12 standing near, and when 
children, mounted and afoot. It was he approached threw him on Tegan- 
ration day at the Agency and that, te. This brought an excited protest 
with the presence of the Commission, from the other side. Calm and im- 
had drawn an unusually large num- passive the red man listened to it. and 
ber together, 6,000 to 8,000, practic- when the judges ruled against him la- 
ally all of them in gala dress. They took the boy down and mounted 
made a brave show, moving about in himself. 

their paint and beads ; dashing here At the word they wen- oil. I Issian 
and there ; running short races; call- at first leading by a couple of lengths 
ing to each other, and trying to cross or more. At the first quarter 
the course kept clear by the Agency te's fantastic nose was opposite lap- 
police. A New Yorker, a guest of brown's knee, at the half mile it was 
the captain's, and Hungry Snake, an still there, and Beckett's heart beat 
old chief, were the starters and as he saw how easily he kept hi- po- 
judges. The First Sergeant was sition. As they passed oul of sight 
posted on the hill, to see that every- at the turn of the hill the Ian 
thing went straight while the horses sickened, for he could see that 1. 
were out of sight of the judges. gante's rider was not letting hin 
I All was ready, except that Howl- As they came into view again I p 
ing Bull had not appeared with his brown's face was white, for, tr 



i6o 



RECREATION. 



he could, he could not get that yel- 
low nose one inch to the rear. A 
wave of wonder seemed to roll over 
the hitherto silent Indians, who gave 
vent to a scries of grunts. 

" By gum," said a soldier standing 
near the judges, " you're done, Beck. 
Bull can win any way he pleases." 

Beckett's only reply was an oath. 

Nearer they came to the post. At 
about the last quarter Howling Bull 
gave Tegante his head a little. He 
shot forward like a locomotive at the 
opening of the throttle, and Ossian 
was a length or thereabouts in the 
rear and there remained until the 
race was won, and Lipbrown and 
Beckett ruined financially. 

Two days later Troop O returned 
to the fort. The morning it started, 
while the Captain was breakfasting, 
Howling Bull appeared at his tent 
leading the horse the Crows had sto- 
len. Only those who have seen a 
lost horse returned under similar cir- 
cumstances can form an idea 'of 
what then occurred. I, therefore, 
will not attempt to describe it. 

"At last there is one honest In- 
dian," said the Captain. " Howling 
Bull said if I'd let Ossian run he 
would try to find Thunder and Boots, 
and he's done it." 

Said the Captain's New York 
friend, a racing man : " See here, 
Captain, your flag looks awfully like 
that Indian's horse." 

" Of course he does. Everyone 
knows they're both sorrels, of about 
the same weight." 

Howling Bull grunted a "Thank 
you " as he pocketed a neat reward 
for the return of Thurder and Boots, 
and the episode was ended — that is 
to say, not quite ended, for at "sta- 
bles" that evening, 30 miles away 
from the Agency, Lipbrown, tremen- 
dously excited, came up to the Cap- 
tain, and, without even saluting, 
gasped out : 



" See 'ere, sir ! I've dropped on 
somethink ! Hull is a scoundrel, sir ! 
I've found yellow paint on Thunder's 
blaze, and ye can see where his legs 
'as ben painted black, and his tail 
looks like it's been chawed ! That 
Injun's did us up. He's changed 
'orses on us ! " 

This supposed duplicity of Howl- 
ing Bull caused a great to-do in 
camp, for nearly every man there had 
lost more or less on the race. Lip- 
brown attempted to return to the 
Agency and was put under guard. 
The captain showed the First Ser- 
geant how improbable the farrier's 
suspicions were and refused to take 
any action. 

The episode had an echo, however. 
Many years later, when the Captain 
had become a major, he met Beck- 
ett, then a big Indian-cattle contract- 
or, and in the course of conversation 
Beckett said : " You remember, the 
race at the — — Agency, one of your 
men and I got up with an Indian 
named Howling Something or oth- 
er r 

"Your brother-in-law." 

"Ye-es— then. Well, sir, that fel- 
low let us in beautifully. He knew 
your horse and run him off himself 
and got that Crow outfit to leave 
early in the morning, so you'd think 
they had taken him ; and when you 
thought so he made the race. He 
kept the horse over in Sour Apples 
village until the race day, when he 
painted out all his marks, clipped 
his tail, so he would look like Te- 
gante, and won. He nearly ruined 
that soldier and me. I was a year 
and over, getting straightened out. 
An Indian is a low-down, mean beg- 
gar. No trusting him. And by the 
way, Colonel, nothing about that 
brother-in-law business, you know. 
My wife is kind of uppish. Her 
father was a governor, and she 
mightn't like it." 



THE CHASE. 



" Over the hills and far away, 

Beyoi.d their utmost purple rim, 

And deep into the dying clay, 

The happy princess followed him." 



The reason is not far to seek — 

The girl was on a first-class wheel, 

And so, of course, just like a streak, 
She pedaled closely at his heel. 

Emma Carleton. 



Jl 



A 



a I 



<a^ J.W.CP^WFoqa 



I am crowdin' close to eighty, gittin' mighty near the end, 
My hair is white an' scattered, an' my back has gol a bend. 
I am shaky on my trotters, an' my eyes has got so dim 
I kin scarcely see yon mountain that so of'en I have dim. 
I've gathered up some treasures that I value mighty high, 
An' thar's one which all the money o' the earth could aever buy. 
Among my goods an' chattels here I prize it more than all 
That ol' Kentucky rifle hangin' thar ag'in the wall. 



Its stock is scarred an' battered, an' its bar'l is full o' nicks ; 
Lts lock is worn with sarvice till I scarce kin hear its clicks. 
It's lost the shinin' beauty 'at it had when I was young. 
But when it speaks it hasn't lost the sharpness of its tongue. 
It was my lone companion when this country was a wild, 
I loved it dear as father ever loved a favored child. 
An' I've seed some moments when to me 'twas all in all, 
That ol' Kentucky rifle hangin* thar agf'in the wall. 





Lots o' deer has fell before it ; yes, an' main a panther, i > i, 

An' in early days some Injuns knowed about what it could do. 

An'a squir'l'seye peepin' at me from the very tallest tree 

I could bu'st all into bits an' bring the critter down to me. 

An 'theChris'mas' shootin' matches, master mine! hut wa'n't the tun 

An' I reckon I surprised 'em with the shootin 'at I done. 

Every turkey 'at I drawed on caught the vengeance of a ball. 

From 'at ol' Kentucky rifle hangin thar ag'in the wall. 



I have seed the new inventions they are makin' now-a-days. 

An' I own they're mighty slick in a variety o' ways ; 

They are han'some fur to look at. you can load 'em with a snap, 

An' you never have the trouble of puttin' on a cap ; 

You kin shoot 'em mighty lively when you bring 'em to the scratch. 

Never have to ram ver bullets, never have to cut a patch. 

But fur close an' hair-breadth shootin' I could one day down 'em all 

With that ol' Kentucky rifle hangin' thar ag'in the wall. 



Thar's one thing makes me love it as I never did afore— 
When I heered the ringin" summons callin' loyal men to war ; 
All the fire that nerved my daddy in the Revolution days 
Got a-surgin' in my bosoni till my heart was all ablaze. 
Then I shouldered that ol' rifle, filled my bullet pouch with lead, 
Put that ol' warm cap o' coonskin sort o' keerless on my head, 
An' I offered them the sarvice of a mighty keen-eyed man 
Fur to do some fancy shootin' under glorious old Berdan. 



I'm not inclined to braggin' — quit that business long 
But when I am called to answer fur m\ statements here below, 
I kin face the great Commander with a conscience Tar an' brijht, 
Arter savin' that ol' rifle done her shar' in mam alight. 
Mus'n't it 'a' been surprisin', when a Reb thought lie was hid. 
Fur to git a sharp remembrance i as a many ol 'em did'. 
That the optics of a Yank was penetratin' as a haw 
When a s'archin' fur a graxcoat hid up in trees or i" 



Through the bloody war I packed her. and brought her home 
Proud an' sassy o' tin' record that 1 tuk her in to win : 
An' when age was creepin' on me an' I couldn't shool no n 
With m v shak\ hands I hung her up to rest above the door. 
When this ol' an' worn-oul bod) underneath the ground the) hide. 
I've asked 'em fur t<> lav it sorl o' lovin' b) m\ -id<\ 
An' when Gabr'el blows his trumpet I'll man h up'ard at the 
Hangin' on to that ol' rifle over thar ag'in the wall. 





•V^to 



AN OUTING ON THE PESHTIGO. 



Frank K. Root. 




THE memory of one particular 
trip to the woods is especially 
vivid in my mind. We have 
talked it over more than once, my 
"compagon du voyage' and I. We 
were in campr on the Peshtigo early 
in June — not too early to enjoy nature 
in that northern latitude, for she was 
even then arrayed in all her spring- 
time loveliness. Not too early for 
the birds, for they were there when 
we arrived — many species and va- 
rieties of them keeping the air full of 
song from sunrise until sunset. Then 
the whippoorwills would tune up and 
serenade us until far into the night. 

Last, but not least in quantity or 
quality, were those sociable little 
birds, the mosquitos and black flies. 
My companion, the lawyer — ' Hon- 
orable Kounselor " I shall call him — 
remarked that they were thicker 
than the wicked little insects that 
live on the outside of the dog. For 
my own part I should say that in- 



stead of mosquito their name was 
legion. I merely mention the fact of 
their presence as one of the features 
of the summer landscape we were 
not too early for. 

They did not spoil our fun, though, 
by any means. Far from it. Our 
smeared faces by day and our nets 
by night kept them at bay. The 
" dope" with which we smeared was 
designed by the Honorable Koun- 
selor, and stands in our annals a 
monument to his genius. It is sim- 
ply a mixture of equal parts of vase- 
line and tar oil of the " tarrest " 
kind. It proved so offensive to the 
mosquitos that they would not go 
near any feature covered with it ; 
and the black flies were neatly 
drowned before they could get in 
their murderous work. I can recom- 
mend this mixture to brother anglers 
as being most effective. Nearly all 
th^ other doses I have tried the 
mosquitos would feed on with appar- 



AN OUTING ON THE PEST HI GO. 



[6 



ent relish, and, after finishing the 
medicine, would begin on me. 

Our tent was pitched on a breezy 
knoll, almost on the river bank, and 
while not as picturesque as many 
camp sites we have chosen else- 
where, was convenient to the fishing 
waters, and generally acceptable. 
Without knowing it we had camped 
on a runway of the deer. Scarcely 
had we finished making camp, on the 
afternoon of our arrival, when we were 
treated to a sight that made us glad 
we came. A beautiful doe came and 
stood for a moment just on the edge 
of the woods, not more than 200 
yards away. She had evidently in- 
tended to cross the river, but a view 
of the camp made her change her 
mind. After giving us only an in- 
stantaneous view her hoofs twinkled 
and her white flag waved us a ta-ta, 
as she bounded away. Several times 
in the next few days, we were 
treated to glimpses of deer, one and 
two at a time. One morning, glanc- 
ing across the river, we saw a mag- 
nificent buck standing on the bank, 
gazing at our camp. No doubt he 
was wondering who presumed to oc- 
cupy his property and block his 
thoroughfare. With a background 
of dense foliage, brilliantly green in 
the morning sun, he made the " chef 
d'oeuvre " of our living pictures. 

The Peshtigo is a grand trout 
.stream. It should be not only care- 
fully protected, but continually 
stocked. In addition to our own na- 
tive fontinalis, the rainbow trout is 
now fairly plentiful there and a num- 
ber of fine fellows are taken each 
season. The Peshtigo is the stream 
of all streams for comfortable fly 
fishing. We had great sport, and a 
fair measure of success. 

To the right of our camp, not 25 
feet away, between banks interlaced 
with alders, the Little Eagle made 
its small way into the Peshtigo. It 
is a cold, clear little stream full of 
trout. At any time of day we could 
drop them a line and get an immedi- 
ate reply. All we caught were little 
fellows, under eight or ten inches, 
but they graced our festive board 




" A STR \\(.l < HI) WOODSM W." 

and figured conspicuously in many a 
toothsome dish prepared by my 1 <>m- 
panion. who is -quite as effective 
before a campfire a- U-I«>i< .1 jury. 
The German fried pol Li 
accompanying them (the trout, not 
the jury) were sometimes d by 

the writer, who qould fish l» tter than 
he could cook, to .1 Fair 
gastronomic pn fection Sometimes 
they were not. 



1 64 



RECREATION. 




A GOODLY POOL. 



Brush fishing is not the most at- 
tractive kind to us, and the Little 
Eagle was full of brush, logs, snags, 
and roots, from start to finish. To 
dangle a baited hook with 18 inches 
of line from the end of a rod, drop 
it in among brush, with the chances 
about even for a small trout or a 
large snag— and, if a trout, to yank 
him out without benefit of clergy, has 
little of real sport in it. We could 
always get the fish, though, and sim- 
ply took enough for the frying pan, 
then stopped. 

On the other hand it was the acme 
of fishing to wade the beautiful, 
broad Peshtigo, casting the fly, tak- 
ing comparatively few trout, to be 
sure, but what beauties ! Few of 
them weighed under half a pound, 
and often we would get a big, lusty 
chap that would make things hum 
for a while before coming within 
reach of landing net. Give me about 
five good brook trout killed in this 
way, and my friends may yank a hun- 
dred from, the brush without a parti- 
cle of envy on my part. 



I could spin this yarn longer by 
telling of several excursions to the 
Big Eagle, two miles from our camp, 
where we got good-sized trout, and 
plenty of them, with both bait and 
fly, and of sundry other interesting 
and enjoyable short trips with 
rod and camera; but it is time to 
ring off. 

We spent ten jolly days at our lit- 
tle camp, lounging under the tall 
Norways on the river bank, fishing as 
the spirit moved us, resting when 
we felt that way, and chatting with 
a strange old woodsman who visited 
our camp several times. 

When the Honorable Kounselor 
and I go into the woods, the feeling 
that we are near to Nature's heart is 
enough, and we are well content to 
watch and study her children, and 
listen to the songs of her birds. We 
always go home refreshed as to body 
and brain. This trip was no excep- 
tion to the rule. We have stored 
away the most pleasing memories of 
the success of our outing on the 
Peshtigo. 



A MYSTERY OF THE TETONS. 



Ed. H. Trafton. 



TEN or twelve years ago the 
Teton Basin and Jackson's 
Hole afforded the best big 
game range in the Rocky Mountains, 
and, for that matter, still do. Moose, 
elk, mountain sheep and deer were 
there in thousands, while silver tip, 
cinnamon, brown and black bears 
were plentiful, as well as small fur 
animals. 

In the Fall of '83 an incident hap- 
pened to me, up there, that I want to 
tell the boys about. I was trapping 
beaver on the Little Cottonwood, 
south of Jackson's Lake. I also had 
a line of fox traps set, extending 
from camp to the foot of the lake, 
some ten or twelve miles. One day 
after making the rounds of my traps, 
I came back and found Teton Jack- 
son in camp, making himself right at 
home, cooking his supper on my fire 



and apparently enjoying himself in 

great shape. 

" Hello, Ed !" he sang out, as I 
rode up to the camp fire; " 1 thought 
this was your camp when I struck 
here by the way them beaver was 
stretched." 

Jack was considered " hard game," 
in those days, and likely to be follow- 
ed into camp, anytime, by a vigilance 
committee or by some outfit that he 
had "pinched" (stolen horses from); 
but as I was camped all alone I was 
glad to have company for a few days, 
even if I had to fight for it. Jack 
was good company in camp, il he was 
bad; so we proposed next day to go 
up my line of traps, kill some elk, 
a lot of tallow, bring in the hides and 
make us a good elk-hide rope. 

We saw r several large bands of elk 
on our way up the line, all the way 




-"AND STARTED TO CUT HIS THROAT.' 



i66 RECREATION. 

from 25 to 300 in a bunch ; but they into the timber until we caught sight 

were off several hundred yards and of the other bull. Jack slid off and 

we knew we could kill plenty right shot him. We dressed him, and took 

along the trail before we made the about 30 pounds of tallow out of him. 

round trip, so we did not go after Jack threw the hide over his saddle, 

them. and we went back to skin the bull I 

And now fellows, now comes the had killed. I took the lead, right 

thing that has puzzled and bothered back to the edge of the park, but 

old Ed. from that day to this. I was when we got there we couldn't see 

in the lead, and we were riding any dead elk ! "That's funny," I 

through heavy pine timber. About said, and I walked right up to the 

100 yards ahead of us was a little place where he fell, and there was 

opening or park of about three acres, the blood. 

As we neared it we heard a bull elk Now, I'll say right here, that in 

whistle. We stopped, and again he this park the ground was very soft 

whistled ; coming right toward us and loamy ; and there had been a 

from the other side of the park. heavy shower the night before. A 

" Jack," said I, " I'll drop out of the fox couldn't pass through the open- 
saddle, and when the old fellow comes ing without leaving a clean track, 
out into the park I'll down him." This big bull was the only one which 

Pretty soon the old fellow walked had been in that park since the 

out. I let him get in the middle of shower, and his tracks were just as 

the little park, when he stopped and plain as could be, from the edge of 

let out a snort, turned broad-side to the timber up to where he fell, a dist- 

me and blew his whistle again. Then ance of about 50 yards. There was 

again he turned his head in the air the blood and the print of the elk's 

for an instant as if he scented danger, body where he had fallen, and that 

Fellows, he was a prince among elk was all. That settled it. 

— one of the largest I ever saw. Boys, that bull elk never made 

I found he was about to go, so. I another track after he struck the 

raised " old meat in the pot " till my ground. I looked around at Jack, 

eye touched the line of sights, and and he looked at me. I said : 

sent a 50-caliber ball into him, close "Jack, what in the name of God 

to the heart. He dropped his head does this mean ? " 

and shook like a leaf . He swayed for He never spoke, but looked at the 

a moment like a- drunken man, then ground ; then walked in a circle clear 

threw his head high in the air and around where the elk had lain. We 

blew the most mournful whistle I both made this circle ; not only once, 

ever heard. I shall never forget the but many times. Every time our feet 

effect it had on me. It seemed to touched the ground they left plain 

chill the blood in my veins. He ran tracks. Jack looked up in the trees, 

backward three or four steps, and Then he turned to me and said : 

then pitched over dead. We went " Ed., does elks ever fly ? " 

up to him, and Jack was looking at " Only on four legs," I said, 

the bullet hole behind the foreleg. "Ed., do you remember that mourn- 

He said, "You shot him through ful whistle he made when you shot 

the heart, or close to it." him ?" 

I had just cut through his hide and I did not answer, but I felt the 

into the neck far enough to start the blood again freeze in my veins. I 

blood, when we heard another bull started for my horse — so did Jack — ■ 

whistle, about 200 yards from us in and we both struck for camp, 

the timber. Neither of us spoke until we arrived 

"Jack," I said, "let's get that fel- there. 

low while he is close by." Boys, I never was superstitious ; 

We mounted and left the dead and as for Teton Jack, he wasn't 

elk — for he was stone dead — and rode afraid of the devil nor of all his imps ; 



A MYSTERY OF THE TE10NS. 







"ED., DOES ELKS EVER FLY?" 

but he had the blues so bad for the mile of it but what something in- 
next two days, that he saddled up, duced me to look again tor the 
pulled out and left me. carcass of that elk' I killed, and 
I have killed a great many elk and try to solve the mystery of how 
bear in the vicinity of that park since the old giant ever left that park with- 
'83, and I have never been within a out making tracks or other signs. 



THE SPORTSMAN'S SONG. 

L. E. HOLMES, M. D. 

What time the wild bird's flight is north, 

When the blue-bells dot the hills, 
I'll rise from cares and hie me forth 
To sport among the brooks and rills; 
The tempting fly 
Will catch the eye 
Of spotted fin on rippling rills; 
No ding-dong cares will there be nigh, 
No weary brain, no grief-born sigh, 
With sport among the rifts and rills- 
Sport among, sport among, sport among 
The rifts and rills. 



When clover casts away its bloom, 

And fawns are old enough to run; 
When frost comes with the early gloom, 
And fox's coat is deeply dun, 
My trusty gun 
Will bring me fun. 
My loyal dog shall come with me 
Among the brake and in the brush, 
And never break at lark or thrush; 
But sport with me in joyous glee — 
Sport with me, sport with me, sport with me 
In joyous glee. 



When snow comes down in feathered fla 
And grouse creep into sheltered no 

When ice doth cover stream and la!. 
At home again to toil and books, 
To books and friends 
We'll make amends; 

With wife and babes at even-time, 
And cheery ale of hue like cream, 
And songs of sports by mount and stream, 

We'll have a merry, happy time 

We'll have a happy, happy, happy time. 



SHOOTING IN THE NORTHWEST 

James K. Boyd. 




F 



ROM early 
spring, 
t h r o u g h 
all the summer, 
our party, when- 
ever we met, 
had something 
to say of our 
prospective 
western trip in 
the autumn of 
1894. Many 
were the con- 
jectures as to 
the best time to 
go, the pros- 
pects for sport 
and how many would finally go. 
As the time drew near it became evi- 
dent that at least one of the quartet 
would have to remain at home, and, 
strangely enough, if proved to be 
the single man. One other had 
many misgivings and a third saw 
breakers ahead; but finally we set 
the time of departure for Saturday, 
September 22nd. We selected the 
Lehigh Valley and Grand Trunk rail- 
ways to Chicago and, with dog in 
charge of one man, another carrying 
two grips, and -each of us loaded with 
guns, rubber coats, etc., we started. 
We reached Chicago at 9:25 p. m., 
Sunday, transferred to the Chicago 
and Northwestern railway, and left 
on the 10:30 train for St. Paul. That 
city was reached at 11:55 a * m > anc ^ 
as the Northern Pacific train was to 
go at 4:15 p. m., we had ample time 
to attend to call on friends there. 
Again, at 4:15 p. m. we were on a 
train of fourteen sleepers and 
coaches drawn by two locomotives. 

The following morning found us at 
our destination in North Dakota, 
where we were met by our guide of 
the year before, and who soon 
landed us at his house. As he was 
busy, we concluded to hunt alone 
during the afternoon of that day. 
We started with our team, but were 



disappointed in not finding plenty of 
grouse where we had found great 
numbers the year before. We picked 
up thirteen grouse and twenty-three 
snipe. Some practice on plover and 
jack rabbits enabled us to " get our 
hand in." 

The next day we killed an equal 
number of grouse and had a little 
pass shooting, during the late after- 
noon, when we killed a fine string of 
mallards, teal and snipe. 

We devoted the next day to 
grouse shooting and had a good day's 
sport, killing forty-five. Much of 
this shooting was done in thick 
cover and we had great difficulty in 
scoring some of the birds. 

The following day, bright and 
early, found us on the way to a lake 
where we had found excellent shoot- 
ing at ducks and geese the year be- 
fore. Now, we found only a dry 
slough. In fact, many of the lakes 
and sloughs were entirely dry, and 
on a windy day the alkali dust was 
extremely disagreeable. The im- 
mediate neighborhood was barren of 
prairie chickens where last year we 
killed many. We returned to our 
pass and killed a few ducks, of vari- 
ous kinds. We put in the fifth day 
at a large lake, said to be good for 
redheads, canvasbacks, teal and grey 
ducks, but the result was not en- 
couraging. 




SHOOTING IN THE NORTHWEST. 






Our next move took us a long way 
from our stopping place. We found, 
on a large cattle ranch, a sociable 
host and a good and true sportsman. 
We spent two days and nights with 
him and using boat and decoys, 
killed a fine string of canvasbacks, 
redheads, mallards, pintails and teal, 
with a few snipe. On our return to 
our guide's house we concluded to 
seek a better grouse country in Min- 
nesota, particularly as a guide there 
had been highly recommended to 
us, by a man who had employed 
him. 

It took us two days and nights to 
transfer from one hunting country to 
the other, with all the attending 
pleasures and difficulties and in as 
disagreeable weather as you can 
imagine. We arrived at our new 
quarters late in the evening, tired 
and wet, and did not find much com- 
fort awaiting us; but in a man who 
is so devoted to his pipe and so fond 
of killing big game as our new guide 
proved to be one must not expect 
much interest in bird shooters. 

Still, we decided to make the best 
of a bad bargain, and started out 
next morning to look for grouse. 
The country had been burned over, 
and the fires had doubtless driven 
many of the birds away, but by hard 
work we picked up some thirty 
odd birds in two days. Otherwise, 
we should have been short of meat, 
for our host had none. Notwith- 
standing we were in a farming and 
cattle country, he had no milk and 
we had to send out and buy it. The 
farmer and his wife, however, be- 
lieved in variety. The first day we 
had beans and butter; the second 
day beans and bread, and the third 
day bread and butter. 

We saw, in all, seven deer, during 
our stay, and it was laughable to see 
the writer driving on one occasion 
an ill-matched pair of bronchos, over 
ditches and through bushes, at a rat- 
tling gait, in a vain attempt to give 
our "moose hunter" guide a shot, 
with a single-barrelled shotgun, at a 
running deer 150 to 200 yards ahead 
of us. Needless to say he did not 




A TRIO OF SHARP TAILS. 

BY KIND PERMISSION OF CHAS. S. FEE. C. P. A.. N.P HV. 

get the deer. As I have intention- 
ally, and for obvious reasons, omitted 
all names of places and people, I 
will not here reveal the name of our 
alleged guide. 

On the third morning we awoke to 
find about two inches of miow on the 
ground, and it was still snowing 
hard. We had determined to start 
for home that day. at all events, but 
we came near not doing so. for it 
ever there were weak-minded people 
anywhere we found them up th 
However, by repeated bracings and 
urging, we got the guide to hook up 
a team and take us in. 

Halfway to the railway station, 
and about eighteen miles from our 
starting place- we stopped, at \\ 
p. m., for the night. 1 [ere we found 
the best built and appointed h« ■ 
we had seen on our trip, presided 
over by a highly entertaining and 
energetic lady and her daughter. 
The district school teacher was 
boarding with them, making alto- 
gether, a most delightful family. 



170 



RECREATION. 



We took a walk, after having our 
team attended to, and got five prairie 
chickens and ten ruffed grouse, in 
about an hour's shooting. We en- 
joyed this so much that we almost 
forgot our hardships and the poor 
fare of two or three previous days. 

On returning to our new quarters we 
found an excellent supper awaiting 
us, to which we did ample justice. I 
cannot say too much for the hospi- 
tality and kindness of these people. 
We are planning to return there for 
a longer visit. 



Bright and early next morning 
found us moving slowly toward the 
railway station, where we arrived at 
4 p. m., and boarded our train for 
home. I hope I shall never again 
fall into the clutches of so lazy and 
worthless a specimen of humanity as 
was this so-called "guide." 







A TOAST. 
Jessie Forsyth Cline. 

They talk of their castles in Spain, 
Of their gold-frescoed ceilings and walls. 

Where guitar and the mandolin's strain 
Enravish the echoing halls ; 

And love has a softer refrain. 

They write of their castles in Spain, 
Steep in poetry the eloquent pen, 

With folk-lore and tales entertain, 
Of glances that fascinate men, 

Of lips and of eyes that enchain. 

But I covet no castle in Spain, 

Be it filled with the Orient's wealth ; 
In our cot she and happiness reign 

And I — let us drink to her health- 
Madeira ? Oporto ? Champagne ? 



RECREATION. 



>;i 



This cut is from a photograph of the home 
of the Bogota Boat Club, which is on the 
Hackensack river, at Bogota, N. J., 40 min- 
utes from New York, via the New York, 
Susquehanna & Western R. R. The Club 
was organized in April of the present year, 
and during its brief existence has acquired 
some fine shore-front property and has built 
a handsome and commodious club-house. 
It has a number of gigs, shells, working 
boats, etc., and an excellent bathing beach. 




Among other sports which the club indulges 
are tennis, billiards and trap shooting. The 
non-resident dues are low. The following is 
is a list of members : 

A. E. Bauer, M. B. Brinkman, F.W. Cane 
W. H. Cane, M. Davis, E. B. Duvall, A. M. 
Hesser, C. M. Horton, L. Kirby, J. C. Kent, 
C. Krieger, W. C. Lefferts, R. C. Lydecker, 
A. G. Munn, Jr., S. G. Munn, H. F. Munn, 
H. T. Munn, R. W. S. Negus, W. J. Parker, 
G. Van Keuren, E. A. Jackson, H. W. Jack- 
son, F. A. Jackson, L. Lozier, K. C. Rogers, 
P. C. Terhune, Carl Wille, Wendel Andrews, 
Chas. S. Conklin, F. C. Dunn, W. W. Clay- 
ton, John E. Huyler, Harry Hopkins, S. V. 
S. Williams, Chas. B. Rockwell, J. Howard 
Wells, E. F. Bartsch, Fritz Lindemeyer, B. 
C. Van Dyke, Robt. W. Holmes, F. A. Wil- 
liams, J. W. Halberton, H. H. Fiedler, Geo. 
Brown, C. A. Peck. 

St. Paul, Minn. 
The little Davenport rifle is a beauty and 
I am surprised at its shooting qualities. 
Some of my friends think of buying, also. 

E. J. Pauli. 

Oroville, Wash. 
Young grouse are ripe but there is not 
more than half a crop. Seven are the most 
I have seen in a flock. The usual number 
is one or two. Lew WlLMOT. 




Hoboken, N. I. 

We are readers of your valuable ma 
zine, and take great pleasure in sending 
you a photograph of ourselves, taken with 
a telo-photographic lens, by an amateur, on 
a misty morning, at a distance of over half 
a mile. The photo represents duck shoot* 
ing on the salt marshes of New [ersey. 

Harry Lange, Wm. Schi in. 



St. Paul, Minn. 
Editor Recreation: 

The Amateur Gun Club held a shooting 
match at Inover Grove, near St. Paul, re 
cently, at which Blue Rocks were used and 
some good scores made. A. E. PetT) u-><-d 
10 gauge gun; E. C. powder, w urs., 1 
card wad, 0/% felt, 1 No. o.blk. eage, i-ioth 
blk. edge, \ l /% oz. No. 8 shot. B. I.. Pern 
used same load, Remington gun. 1'. 11. 
Merd used a 12 gauge high grade gun, 
E. C. powder, 2% drs., same wadding. I. B. 
Emmerson, 10 gauge Colt Ham men ess, 
drs. E.C., \% ()Z - shot. The birds were thrown 
against a strong wind which made them 
hard to get. Mr. Emmerson usually heads 
the list, but the poor background and tin- 
wind were too much lor him. This i> tin- 
last of our shoots at Blue Rocks this fall. 

1 . I.. II. 



Executive ( >ffice, Cheyenne, W 

There is nothing new in the l.i< ks- 
Hole affair. The Indians arc not hui 
in Wyoming at present, and it i> doubtful 
if they do so again tin- year. Some "t tin- 
eastern folks seem to feel had because no 
white people were killed. 

\\ . A. Richards, < k>i 1 



Memphis, Tenn. 

Thursday a friend and I killed ! 
chucks and gol r8 squirrels from our n< 
gunners, t<> uh<>m ^allinipers and sn 
have no terrors if cash and todd) 
promised. W. A. Whi \m 1 ,. 




0F THE AZTECS 



Dr. Edward J. Tucker. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

JESSIE MAKES HER CHOICE. 

I ARRIVED at the little church 
and took a seat in the darkest 
corner just before Mr. Sheldon 
and his daughter drove up to the 
door. As Jessie entered I noticed 
she paused to glance around the little 
assemblage. I held a book before 
my face so that she did not see me. 
From time to time, during the serv- 
ice, she glanced around, and, as the 
morning wore on, a look of anxiety 
shaded her mobile face. Then for 
the first time I became aware of the 
absence of Steve. A pang of jeal- 
ousy seized me, and I felt that I had 
over-estimated my strength. As I 
noticed her impatience painful, bitter 
thoughts crowded upon me, and I 
would have given the world to have 
been able to retire unnoticed, but the 
church was so quiet, save for the mo- 
notonous tones of the preacher, that 
I almost feared to breathe. I resolved 
to move quietly out the moment the 
doxology was read, and I awaited it 
with impatience. 



Our heads were bowed in final 
prayer and I arose to make my es- 
cape, when I came face to face with 
Jessie, who had quietly taken a seat 
beside me. 1 felt my face flush 
crimson, and then grow pale as death. 
In my agitation I sat down and bur- 
ied my face in my hands. The look 
of pity I saw in her brown eyes un- 
nerved me. I heard the congregation 
file out and Mr. Sheldon come down 
the aisle ; a whispered consultation 
took place between his daughter and 
himself, and then he passed out. 

A small, soft hand was laid on my 
head and a trembling voice said : 

"Allen!" 

I raised my head and gazed into 
her clear eyes. 

" Did you mean to leave us without 
a word of cheer ?" 

Something of my old rebellious 
mood provoked me into saying : 

" I did not suppose you cared 
whether I spoke to you or not." 

She flushed a little and said : " Al- 
len, we are in God's holy temple. 
For His sake let us avoid earthly 
passions. I have thought of you 



GUATEMOTZIN: THE LAST OF THE AZTECS. 



. 



often, and have prayed for you in 

your loneliness. I pity you from my 

hi. " 
eart. 

41 And why do you pity me?" I 
asked. 

" For the uncontrollable spirit that 
rages within you. Oh, Allen, even 
now I see you vainly endeavoring to 
suppress it. It has caused you to 
drive all your friends from you. Even 
I had not been acquainted with you 
one hour before you deeply offended 
me. 

"It is well enough for you to 
preach to me," I cried hotly, "you 
are prejudiced ; and were I an angel 
you would yet see in me only a devil 
incarnate." 

A look of intense pain whitened 
her delicate features, and without 
another word she turned and passed 
out of the door. I bowed my head 
in my hands, angry at myself that, 
without cause, I had again offended 
her. 

"Allen!" 

I did not look up, for I knew who 
stood beside me. 

" Allen, twice before have I listened 
to the voice of pride and turned from 
you on account of your bitter tongue, 
and each time I have regretted I had 
not been more forbearing. What 
makes you so bitter ? You are more 
like a Philistine than a Christian 
man. You not only offend me, but 
you cannot live in peace and har- 
mony with your own father and 
brother." 

" Do you believe there are some 
wrongs that may not be endured ? " 

"Surely; but you have not such 
wrongs." 

" You yourself have wronged me," 
I exclaimed. 

"In what manner?" 

" In our first meeting you say I 
offended you. You laughed at and 
taunted me when I was painfully 
oppressed by a sense of inferiority. 
You goaded me into a rude remark, 
and when I humbly craved pardon 
you spurned me from you. I was 
then suffering from the knowledge 
that your accident was due to my 
folly, and was anxious to atone by 



being of service to yon. I have been 
miserable ever since." 

She paled a little and said, so low 
I could scarcely hear her voice : 

" I am sorry I repelled you after 
you candidly acknowledged your 
fault, but I was piqued at your pre- 
suming to kiss me in my helpless 
condition." 

"When you fainted I feared you 
were seriously injured, and I was 
wild with grief and despair. When 
you regained consciousness, in my 
delirious joy I kissed you. I was 
hardly responsible, for I felt a- 
though 1 had murdered you." 

" I am rejoiced to hear it was not 
through presumptuous folly, but you 
were wrong to cause me to injure 
myself. I suffered severely." 

"Your sufferings wen- not more 
acute than my own. I could not en- 
dure the thought of you limping 
home, so I hurried to the farm with 
the intention of hitching our train 
and placing it at your disposal, even 
if you would not allow me to accom- 
pany you home. On the way 1 met 
my brother, who was driving to town. 
I begged for the rig ; he refused, and 
I insisted that he should at least take 
you home. After I confessed I had 
unwittingly injured you. he reluc- 
tantly consented to see you as far as 
Main street. At the same time he 
promised not to tell you who had 
sent him to vour assistance, as I 
feared you would not consent to ac 
cept aid through me. ( m his return 
he unblushingly told me he had be- 
trayed me in acquainting you with 
the fact that I had kicked your hat 
over the bank' into the bushes below ; 
he listened to your reproaches, and 
concealed the fact that I was his 
brother. He knew I had been accus- 
tomed to rough play with the coun- 
try girls of our neighborhood, and I 
believed the hat belonged to one of 
them. Alter I met you 1 was anxious 
to rise above my sphere, and desired 
to enter a medical college- last S 
tember, but my ambition was thwart- 
ed by Steve, who influenced my father 
not to advance the money for my ex- 
penses. Tin- (arm is mine, the money 



1/4 



RECREATION. 



made on it is mine, or at least suffi- 
cient of it to enable me to obtain a 
higher education ; but Steve said he 
had made it, though my father worked 
as hard as he. I was never encour- 
aged to work, and never wanted the 
farm until I learned Steve was em- 
ploying every effort to obtain legal 
possession of it ; not until he painted 
me in such colors as to incur your 
detestation did I-resent his conduct." 

After a painful pause she said, in 
an agitated tone : 

"Am I to understand that all this 
feud and enmity is because of me ? 
Oh, I am so sorry, so miserable." 

" I am sorry to wound you, Miss 
Sheldon, but my lips spoke when my 
heart wished not to speak. I came 
to this church to-day to see you be- 
for leaving these parts forever." 

She looked up quickly. " Where 
are you going ? " 

" Out into the world. I have over- 
estimated my strength, and find 
nothing here but pain and sorrow. J 
am either misunderstood or do not 
understand myself. I am accused of 
possessing an ungovernable temper 
and of wounding those I love. Out 
there in the world I will be an atom 
whose peculiar characteristics will 
injure no one." 

'■ It is possible you may have been 
misunderstood ; but was it manly or 
sensible to ride through the streets 
of a town at such speed as to im- 
peril your life and the lives of oth- 
ers ?" 

" My horse ran away with me, and I 
was endeavoring to get back into the 
country when I passed you." 

" Oh, then you did see us ? " 

" I saw you when I entered the 
street, and would rather have died 
than injure one of those children. In 
fact I expected instant death when I 
faced that gate." 

She held out her hand with a bright 
smile. " Allen, if you had a thousand 
faults that deed would have atoned 
for them all. I have longed to thank 
you for the risk you took of certain 
death. We saw your noble and suc- 
cessful effort to turn your horse into 
the side path, and I wished to con- 



gratulate you on your escape when 
you came through the gate on your 
return, but you would not look up. 
You acted as though you were 
ashamed of your noble deed." 

I looked at the glowing face and 
sparkling eyes, and felt a sensation 
I had never known before. I an- 
swered : "I was ashamed. Every 
blunder I made, every ludicrous po- 
sition I fell into, was before you." 

" You say you are going into the 
world never to return — are you not 
making another mistake ? " 

" Mr. Yost, whose farm adjoins 
mine, wishes to lease more land, and 
I can let him have my farm." 

" I was not thinking of your farm, 
but of your friends." 

" I have no friends." 

" Did I not offer, and did you not 
take, my hand in friendship ?" 

I slowly shook my head and re- 
plied : " Mere friendship would be 
an aggravation. I thought during 
the winter I had conquered the pain 
and heartache ; but I find it would 
be increased if admitted to friendship 
bestowed on others, while it would 
be torture if I were compelled to wit- 
ness the success of Steve." 

She looked sad and thought 
deeply a few moments, and with a 
quiver around the corners of her 
mouth replied : 

" A strange foreboding took pos- 
session of me when the Friends in- 
formed my father he must give up 
his home in Philadelphia and answer 
the call from Wilkesbarre. I tried 
to prevail on him not to go, but, al- 
ways obedient to duty, he answered 
the call and came here. Modesty 
forbids me to listen to wild language 
such as yours, but I am fearful it is 
the same voice of pride I obeyed on 
several occasions, and always regret- 
ted. If I had hearkened to it this 
feud would not have reached the lim- 
its where a house is divided against 
itself — father against son, brother 
against brother. Therefore, do not 
think me without maidenly reserve 
if I again give you my hand and 
pledge you my friendship. I do not 
love Steve, and have told him so ; I 



GUATEMOTZIN : THE LAST OF THE AZTECS. 



75 



do not love you, but like you more knowing we were late for service ? 

than anyone I have ever met." Well, he related how we were under 

"Oh Jessie!" I cried, seizing her obligations to you; how you had 

hands and covering them with kisses, made him promise nol to reveal 

44 I can hardly believe my senses." your name; but he added, with a 

" Nay, Allen, she replied gently, reckless laugh, 'There is no honor 

I have not surrendered my heart to among thieves and gamblers, and as 

you." I am one of that fraternity 1 will 

" No, but you have made me hap- state, for the benefit of the young 

py. You have bidden me to stay." lady, his name is Allen Olney, and 

" I do not wish you to go away, he is now going to your < hurch.' 

Allen, for you know you have an un- I laughed gay ly, for you may be 

governable temper." sure I bore no ill-will to the counter- 

"You will teach me to control it, feiter at that moment. It was tin- 
Jessie." first time Jessie had heard me laugh, 

" Were you not looking for Steve?" and I caught a pleased express 

" I ?" she asked in surprise. in her brown eyes. I was enrap- 

" When you entered the church, tured, and in my happiness held out 

and during service." my arms to her. She hesitated, wa- 

"I was looking for you." vered, but did not attempt to retire. 

" For me !" I replied in amaze- I clasped her in my arms and kissed 

ment. " How were you aware that I her again and again, 

was in the church?" "Have I now the right, my dar- 

" Did you not send a gentleman ling?" I whispered. She smiled, 

with your buggy to our assistance, and answered me with a kiss. 

(to be continued.) 




THE BRIDGE OF SIGHS. 

Amateur Photo. I V. Morti n, il W 




Frances Webster'. 



Ralph Hearne was staying in the 
the little town of Wychly. It 
was a pleasant and picturesque 
village, and several city people, friends 
of his, were spending the hot days of 
summer there. Ralph was a land- 
scape painter, and had never studied 
animal portraiture, but was now re- 
gretting that, for nothing was heard 
or thought of but strange beasts and 
he expected a rare opportunity to 
paint one. 

There had been a big show at 
Wychly. All the barns and fences 
proclaimed it yet, though the date 
was four days past. It was disap- 
pointing to read several yards of 
trapeze performances, only to find 
the acrobats had deftly swung them- 
selves into the next co'unty. 

Yet the choicest, chiefest sensa- 
tion Wychly had known was to 
come. A lion had escaped from a 
side show tent, or a tiger, or a puma, 
or a mountain lion at least. To be 
sure the showman made as little as 
possible of the loss. The men who 
were left behind to find it had given 
up the search and gone. They pro- 
fessed to feel no great respect for 
the missing creature, but the public 
was not to be cheated of possible 
excitement, and more rumors were 
flying about than would have sup- 
plied a dozen shows, were they cage- 
able. Some one had seen some- 



thing strange in some one's cow 
pasture, or hiding in the boughs of a 
tree. The uncertainty as to whether 
the animal swam, ran, climbed or 
crept, added to the interest and 
opened a rich field to the imagina- 
tion. 

Books of natural history were 
hunted up and dusted; hunting par- 
ties searched eagerly; evening walks 
were shortened and a small panic 
prevailed at Wychly. 

All this was entertainment for 
Ralph Hearne. Nay, more, he was 
amused to find his own nerves af- 
fected. He no longer fancied dark 
corners. He found himself scruti- 
nizing doubtful shadows, and it re- 
quired a slight effort of will to set 
up his easel under overhanging 
boughs without often glancing into 
them. He had been in the big 
woods where there were real bears; 
and in the dangerous riots of the pre- 
vious year, he had not been so nerv- 
ous, though on duty with his com- 
pany of militia. 

Just at dusk on a certain evening 
Ralph lay in an easy chair, on the 
piazza of the hotel, with feet in the 
American attitude, the rings of 
smoke from his cigar struggling up 
to the window above, where sat 
a young lady who grew conscious of 
the odor although she could not see 
the smoke. The silhouettes of dis- 



A TRAPPED SENSATION. 






tant trees showed clear against the 
yellow sky. Those in the yard cast 
deep shadows. A young moon com- 
pleted the picture. Ralph was non- 
professional this evening. The 
beauties of departing day were un- 
seen by him. His thoughts had fol- 
lowed his cigar smoke and were 
at that upper window with Mary 
Glenmore. 

She was a tiny dot of a girl, or 
woman, pale, with brown eyes; not 
exactly pretty, but better than that. 
She reminded one of something 
lovely, either seen or heard. Ralph 
had known her slightly for a long 
time, and both of them had seemed 
indifferent to the attractions of the 
other. Yet Ralph was not indiffer- 
ent, he was slightly proud. He could 
not make love to a rich woman, like 
Miss Glenmore, without some sign 
from her that his attentions would 
be welcome. The advantages were 
hers. He would not object to the 
wealth, of course, but he could not 
see through a wall of ice. He fan- 





RALPH LAY IN AN EASY CHAIR. 



"SHE REMINDED ONE OF SOMETHING 

LOVELY." 

cied that there was such a wall be- 
tween them. 

So, here was all the fine material 
for a first-class romance going to 
waste and no one knew ot it. All 
Wychly and her guests were em- 
ployed in the excitement of the 
chase. Ralph had to leave the vil- 
lage the next day, and though he 
and Mary were twin halves of the 
same sphere, they did not know it, 
and each half would go its crippled 
way alone. This would be a real 
misfortune in Miss Glenmoi 
timation, but that, also, no one knew. 
Certainly Ralph never dreamed of it 
as he sat in the twilight and men- 
tally sketched a portrait of a -mail 
pale face, with dark eyes. 

He had never been successful in 
drawing it from tin- memory, and 
had not enjoyed the advanl 
sittings. lie was too practical to 
waste time in sentimental i Ik- 

was gathering his faculties ami re- 
solving to think no more of her. 
The village sensation had helped 
him over' the past few days. He 
was a practical young man and en- 



i;8 



RECREATION. 



joyed fully the diversions that fell 
in his way. 

Now was Miss Glenmore's time, if 
ever, to seize upon and strengthen 
Ralph's preference for her; to twist 
the frail rope of attraction into a 
strong cable. But he was to go to- 
morrow, and she would make no sign. 

Ralph finished his cigar just as he 
heard the tread of the village men on 
their way from the barroom toward 
the balcony for their nightly gossip. 
These recalled his wandering 
thoughts from the window above. 
He had been staring fixedly into a 
dusky tree. 

What was that? A light, or only 
a phorescent gleam in the branches? 
Only a gleam of light from some win- 
dow falling on the leaves. It must 
have been, there was nothing else 
there. Miss Glenmore was talking in 
low tones to some child or pet. She 
closed her window. Many pipes are 
not as one cigar, smoked by a bright- 
eyed artist. 

The evening went 'by in tales of 
strange lands, of adventures, treas- 
ured by Ralph, whom the men found 
inspiring. The old friends showed 
their loyalty to one another in the 
interest they, in turn, accorded to oft- 
told tales, paraded once again for 
the benefit of fresh listeners. 

After the final good-nights, Ralph 
went up stairs to his room. There 
were long, transverse corridors and 
his room lay at one end, not far from 
the window where his thoughts were 
so constantly turning. He felt that 
in this meeting and parting with 
Mary Glenmore, he was at the begin- 
ning of a new episode in his life and 
that it was to have an unsatisfactory 
ending. 

" She," he thought, "would not care 
to be a figure in it, so I will hold up 
my head and go on. I wanted to be 
on the spot when the animal should 
be captured, but five days have given 
it time to reach its native wilds. 
Certainly it might have taken boat 
or train, both stop here regularly, 
and it is used to traveling." 

So Ralph was musing quietly on 
one side of the hall, while on the 



the other side a tableaux was being 
enacted in which Miss Glenmore was 
the central figure. She was asleep 
in a hammock slung across her sit- 
ting room. A white shawl was 
wrapped about her, and the room 
was dimly lighted by a wax candle 
under a rose-colored shade. In the 
shadow of the sleeper, to one side, 
stood a large basket with cushion 
and rug. This was the bed of her 
little dog. Poor fellow, for the last 
few days he had been banished from 
her room and affections for a new 
pet. Now he had entered through 
an accidentally opened door and 
stood on the other side of the ham- 
mock, protesting vigorously against 
the invader, yet with reserve, because 
from the basket was lilted a head 
with long whiskers, gleaming eyes> 
and sibilant " siss" 

To this scene awoke Miss Glen- 
more with a scream of fright. The 
little dog jumped and barked with 
increased fury, and the strange crea- 
ture in the basket continued its 
wauls and hissings. Miss Glenmore 
had reached the hall and was mur- 
dering sleep for the other guests, 
some of whom were thrusting out 
heads into the corridors. Wild 
alarm prevailed, and figures scantily 
clad flitted across the dimly lighted 
halls. 

Ralph was first to reach the battle 
ground, in half dress and with a 
stronger light; at sight of which the 
disturber of the peace leaped from 
the basket and made for darkness, 
through chamber and bath room, 
into a closet or trunk room beyond. 
Fido followed with courage and 
yelp proportioned to the speed of 
the flying foe. Ralph remembered 
the light he had seen in the tree and 
at once associated it with the strange 
creature that now fled through the 
hall. He followed and saw it take 
refuge in the dark recesses of a tele- 
scope valise that stood partly open 
in the trunk room. 

Quicker than thought Ralph seized 
the cover, closed and fastened the 
satchel and turned to apologize for 
his intrusion. 



A TRAPPED SENSATION. 



179 




H-s^W 



HOW DID THAT BRUTE GET IN HEKE, MISS (.1 ENMOR] 



" How did that brute get in here, 
Miss Glenmore ? It's shut up now, 
don't be frightened." He took her 
hand and led her to a chair, while 
the other people secured the prize 
and explained all about the alarm 
with the utmost ignorance and with 
great volubility. 

" Why," she said, " It isn't a brute, 
it's a nice grey kitty; it's perfectly 
tame. It came in on the branches 
of the tree, over the porch roof and 
has stayed there the last two nights. 
I supposed it was some one's pet 
and that I should have to give it up; 
but I should like it to keep." 



11 My dear Miss Glenmore," cried 

Ralph, " it is a cat, but a cat of some 
strange Asiatic kind! It is a fi 
beast. I cannot think- — why y< 
Miss Glenmore, it is the animalthat 
escaped from the show '" _. _^, 

And it was. "The lion " " the 
tiger" — "the puma*' "tin- moun- 
tain lion " the source of all the 
citement and the center oi th 
sensation, had slepl for two nights 
in Fido's basket in Mary Glenmoi 
room. 

Fido has his basket again, but 
has never regained sole | ion 

of his mistre This adventure 



1 8o 



RECREATION. 



broke the wallof ice. Ralph's best pic- Mr. nor Mrs. Hearne ever regret the 
tureshang in Miss Glenmore's home, hospitality shown to the showman's 
but it is his home also, and neither lost cat. 




HIS PROMISE. 
M. H. Wright. 



Now, Sairy Jane, I'm nearly done, 
I've worked ther corn an' taters; 

An' now I'll go an' finish up 
With ther melons an' termaters. 



Now, Jane, I'll try an' fill yer wish, 
For I'm goin' down ter ther river; 

Ye've long been wantin' a mess er fish, 
An' I'm yer cheerful giver. 



I'll not come back 'till I ketch er fish, 
D'ye hear me wat I'm sayin'? 
. An' I'll yank 'im out with er lively swish, 
So don't yer mind my stayin'. 



HOW I GOT MY FIRST DEER 



By Mrs. A. G. Wallihan. 



ONE morning, early in the spring, 
Mr. Wallihan asked me if I 
wished to go out with him and 
a Mr. K. for a deer hunt. Mr. Walli- 
han was teaching both myself and 
Mr. K. to shoot game of all kinds. 
I had shot a rifle but few times, but 
had used our Parker shotgun a 
good deal. Almost my first shoot- 
ing was with this gun, mostly on 
rabbits. I had shot a wild goose on 
the wing, which all thought a great 
feat for me. 

Mr. Wallihan and K. went out to 
saddle our ponies, while I finished 
my breakfast work, and put up a 
lunch. A little flurry of snow came 
on, so we waited until it was over 
and then started. The two miles to 
the cedars were soon covered and we 
tied our horses to trees, and then had 
to wait for another flurry of snow to 
pass. Mr. W. started out in the lead 
to the top of a ridge near by to look 
over and see if any game could be 
seen. He beckoned us to come to 
him, so we. hurried up and when 
nearly to him had to almost crawl, as 
the hill was nearly flat on top. W T e 
had to move cautiously, to avoid 
prickly pears and small brush. Final- 
ly we reached the crest of the ridge 
and could see the deer. As K. had 
killed two deer Mr. Wallihan asked 
him to wait until I had fired, which 
he agreed to do, but just as I had 
my sight on the neck of a buck, 
bang ! went K.'s gun and away went 
the deer. He missed clean and felt 
greatly ashamed. Mr. W. did not 
say much but looked a good deal. 
We kept still a minute when a fine 
buck came out from behind a cedar 
and stopped. My instructor says, 
"be careful and aim at his neck." I 
did as he said and fired. Down went 
the deer with his neck broken. He 
never knew whence his death missile 
came. 
The men were both pleased. We 



went and dressed the deer, and K. was 
bound to carry him on his horse, say- 
ing, " If I can't kill a deer I can at 
least pack this one home for you." 
The men soon had him loaded on 
the horse and we rode home I, at 
least, happy and proud of my shot 
and my trophy, and I have thought 
Mr. Wallihan was prouder of his 
pupil than I of my first deer. Since 
then I have dropped 31 deer with 
my Remington, only wounding three 
and losing none. 

Last fall my husband went out to 
the deer trail to make photographs, 
and as we were out of meat, he told 
me he should depend on me to 
supply it. When we arrived at the 
trail I went about half a mile from 
him so as not to frighten his deer if 
I should get a shot. I waited long 
and patiently, sometimes walking 
around to amuse myself. Alter a 
long time I heard a fawn bleating 
a sure sign of a bunch of deer. 
Nearer and nearer they came. I was 
just over the brow of a hill across 
which I knew they would come. I 
got all ready, with a knee rest, which 
I use when tired. 

Here they come! About ;o ol 
them, and as they passed tin- point 
of a ridge where I could pick out the 
one I wanted I took careful aim at a 
fat young buck and fired. I hit him 
back of the shoulder, high up, and 
he dropped instantly with a broken 
back. Soon I had help to dress him, 
as our hired man was near also look- 
ing for game. We soon had the 
deer ready and loaded into the 
wagon. Then we drove to where 

Mr. W. was to join us. and a- he did 
not keep us waiting long we win- 
soon homeward bound. Mr. \\ . 
had secured two photo- ol I 
bands of deer, and as the meal was 
fine and the pictures good, we 
were well satisfied with our day's 
work. 



SOME BEAR STORIES. 



By W. F. Nichols. 



ROUTT County, Colorado, the 
north-west county of the State, 
is the finest locality in the 
Rockies for all kinds of game. Of 
the bear family we have four differ- 
ent kinds, the silver tip, or grizzly, 
the cinnamon, the black, and the 
small brown or hog bear. The 
black and the hog bear are the 
more plentiful and are easier killed 
than either the cinnamon or sil- 
ver tip. On the main range east 
of Bear river, from Egeria Park to 
the county line, north of Hahn's 
Peak, a fair hunter may, during the 
fall months, average a bear for each 
week if acquainted with the hunting 
grounds. Some of our local sports- 
men have done even better. 

There have been a great many nar- 
row escapes from bears in this local- 
ity, besides others not so narrow. 
The first, close call 1 remember was 
north of town about three miles. A 
Mr. Bennett, one of the old settlers, 
concluded he must have a bear robe 
of his own killing, so, arming him- 
self with a 45-70 Sharp's rifle, and a 
No. 6 Newhouse trap, he traveled up 
Soda creek until he found fresh 
signs. Then he killed a bait, set his 
trap and went back to town to await 
results. 

Next morning he was out early, 
and on nearing the spot where he 
had left his trap found it had disap- 
peared. He looked about until he 
found the trail, he followed it and 
had gone but a short distance when 
he heard a warning growl just in 
front of him, and at the same time 
saw an enormous silver tip bear 
rise from behind a log and start for 
him, rattling the trap and chain over 
the logs as if they were not in his 



way in the least. Mr. Bennett took 
the back track, nor did he stop run- 
ning until he reached town. 

He would neither go to kill the 
bear or show others and, of course, 
lost his trap. He has given up the 
idea of a bear robe, especially a sil- 
ver tip. The next trouble was about 
two miles south of the springs. W. 
H. Dever had gone out to kill a deer. 
He had traveled about a mile from 
his cabin, when he saw a large grizzly 
on the side of the mountain above 
him. Mr. D. was carrying a 40-60 
Winchester that had got wet and the 
firing-pin was rusted. He fired and 
wounded the bear, which turned 
and started at him. He kept snap- 
ping and firing, alternately, until the 
bear was within about eight or ten 
yards of him, when he (Dever) con- 
cluded to take a walk — that is, to go 
home without trying to get meat. 
He had gone but a short distance 
when he noticed the bear was travel- 
ing about the same route he was and 
was making rather better time, al- 
though badly wounded. He was 
then within ten feet of Dever, who 
was fully aware of the fact that some- 
thing must be done besides running; 
so, throwing his gun under his arm 
he fired back, at random, and had 
the good luck to hit the monster in 
the head, killing him instantly. In 
falling the bear turned a somersault, 
his hind feet striking Dever a slight 
tap behind. On examining his gun 
Dever found that the cartridge that 
killed the bear was his last. 

That day's hunt taught him not 
to go again until he had thoroughly 
examined his gun and ammuni- 
tion and put them both in perfect 
order. 



€» 



A naturalist tells us that a snipe has a nerve run- 
ning clear down to the end of his bill. So has the 
plumber. How wonderful are Nature's works ! — Ex- 
change. 



RECREATION. 



[83 



TWO KINDS OF BASE-BALLS. 



A. G. Spalding & Brothers make base- 
balls and sell them to dealers and to con- 
sumers. If they do not make them they 
have them made on contract. They call 
these balls " Official League Balls." They 
give the balls this name because the National 
Base Ball League specifies that balls for its 
use shall be made so and so. Among the 
requirements of the League are : — 

1 ounce of very elastic, pure rubber gum ; 

Clean scoured, first quality, four-ply, pure 
wool, gray yarn ; 

Same quality three-ply gray yarn ; 

Best of fine worsted, with rubber cement ; 

Cover, selected horsehide, drawn to the 
ball, stitched with best heavy linen thread ; 

Circumference, 9 inches ; 

Weight, 5 to $y& ounces. 

Strictly hand made throughout. 

Spaldings make base-balls that conform 
to these specifications in every particular. 
These I will designate as genuine league 
balls. This same firm makes balls that 
do not conform to these specifications by 
any means, but that look exactly like the 
genuine. They are marked the same and 
put up in the same box as the genuine. 
These I will designate as the spurious 
or counteifeit league balls. 

I have before me one of each which I have 
cut open. The genuine ball has, in the cen- 
ter, the required sphere of pure rubber 
which is wound to the depth of % of an 
inch with pure wool gray yarn and worsted, 
and this yarn is filled with rubber cement. 

The spurious ball has in its center a lump 
of composition which looks as if it had been 
made largely of sweepings from the floor of 
some shop or factory. It contains bits of 
brass wire ; brass filings ; scraps of wood 
or leather; some yarn, lint, etc. This trash 
is held together with some kind of dark 
colored stuff that may contain a small per- 
centage of rubber, but it does not look like 
rubber. If Spalding does not like my diag- 
nosis I will have a chemist analyze the stuff 
and see what he can find in it. This lump 
of conglomerate is wound with an inferior 
quality of yarn and worsted — having little 
resemblance to that used in the genuine 
ball. 

Yet this ball bears on its cover these 
markings : — 

" Official League Ball." 

" Adopted by the National League." 

" Adopted by the American Association." 

" Warranted 9 in., 5 oz." 

"A.G.Spalding & Bros., Chicago, New 
York and Phila." 

" Pat'd Feb. 27th, '83." 

It also bears the Spalding trade mark. 

1 have said that Spalding puts up his 
genuine and his counterfeit balls in boxes 
that look alike. This is true. These boxes 
are covered on all four sides with advertise- 
ments of Spalding's goods. Among other 
things they bear this legend : 



I hereby certify that SPALDING'S LEAGUE BALL, 
manufactured by A. G. Spalding A Bhos. 
of New York, Chicago, and 
Philadelphia, has been adopt- 
ed as the official ball of 
the National League 
and American Asso- 
ciation of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs for 
seasons 1892 to 1896 and in all 
Championship games played dur- 
ing 1892 to 1896 this Ball must be useo. *>d . 




Also this 



BEWARE OP COUNTERFEITS. 
The only genuine and official Lerjrue-Ball, as adopted 
by the "National League and Americau Association" for 
1892 to 1896 inclusive, has this signature on each label 



The only difference in the labeling of the 
boxes containing the two grades of balls is 
shown in the two cuts below, which are 
photographic reproductions from two of 




these boxes. The label containing the dim, 
indistinct, mysterious hieroglyphics written 

over the picture, is from the box containing 




the genuine ball. Only salesmen, or ol 
trained in the sign language of the Spalding 
camp would in. tin- tins. If anyone 
should happen to see it he would not know 
what it meant. 

Now comes the most interesting part of 
all this story. I am told that Spalding - 
his genuine league ball and his counterfeit 



1 84 



RECREATION. 



league ball at exactly the same price, though 
the cost of making the spurious ball is cer- 
tainly several cents less than that of making 
the good one. It is said that the counterfeit 
ball is the one usually sold to everybody 
outside the league clubs ; that retail dealers, 
colleges, athletic clubs and amateur ball 
clubs, all over the country, are supplied with 
this cheap imitation ball. 

I am told by men who ought to know that 
ten times as many of the counterfeit balls 
are turned out of the factory each year as 
of the genuine. 

Good amateur players have often won- 
dered why they could not bat a ball as far 
as professionals do. It is because — other 
things being equal — the amateur is playing 
with a ball that is dead, punky and inactive 
— that has a chunk of shop-sweepings in the 
center of it ; while the professional has been 
carefully supplied with a ball that has an 
ounce of pure rubber in it; that is wound 
with good, lively wool, and this wool filled 
with good, lively cement. Amateurs should 
take Spalding's advice and " beware of 
counterfeits." 

Spalding would no doubt like to cry 
"blackmail " when he reads this. He would 
like to tell the public that I have exposed 
his scheme because he does not advertise in 
Recreation. Fortunately, I have a letter 
from him inviting me to call on his adver- 
tising agent and suggesting to the agent 
that he place an advertisement in Recrea- 
tion. I have one from this same agent 
inviting me to call on him, and intimating 
that he would like to arrange for some space 
in Recreation. I did not accept either 
invitation. 

This expose is made solely for the benefit 
of the public, and has no bearing whatever 
on the question of advertisii g. 



lie cartridge, with the hammer (inside) ar- 
ranged to strike and fire each cartridge in 
succession as fast as the trigger can be 
pulled. This arm was invented in 1834, and 
in 1842 was submitted to the Academy of 
Sciences in Paris. It created a warm con- 
troversy between Devisme, Matthieu and 
other Paris gun-makers, who charged 
Devisme with claiming what Colt had in- 
vented, viz.: the rotation of the cylinder by 
the cocking of the hammers, and which he, at 
that time, disclaimed. 

" The gun was not patented, Devisme at 
the time stating that it was free for all to 
make. The original gun, a most beautifully 
finished article, was brought to this country 
by J. D. Orne, of Philadelphia, and was 
kept for a time in the U. S. Patent Office." 

Capt. Philip Reade, U. S. A. 



The cats had been holding nightly con- 
certs in the front yard, greatly to the disgust 
of the family, and in the gloaming the old 
man had thrown a large torpedo at them. 
It landed in the grass, near the sidewalk, 
and failed to "go." Later in the gloaming 
Frank and Lowell, the two hired men, were 
sent to place the garbage barrel at the front 
gate where Colonel Waring's assistant could 
get it. Edouard de Reszke, the baritone cat, 
was there, ready to pounce upon the barrel 
and get his supper. Returning to the house 
Frank saw this large cannon torpedo in the 
grass. 

"Here," said he, "is an onion that has 
fallen from the barrel. I will plug Edouard 
with it. I don't suppose I can hit him, but 
at least I'll plug him." 

And he proceeded to plug. It missed Ed- 
ouard, but landed on the walk beside him 
and exploded with a noise that shook the 



r~r^>i#<s6 ' Csfu&i/£c. &oaZuJc 



J/,tScd*vU<i, 



a&s^ 



DANCED METALLIC CA«TRiD£i - 
TURNEJD y-^BQREJ) QUT 










DEVISME'S REVOLVERS, 

WITH FLANGED METALLIC CARTRIDGE, l8j4. 

Regarding this arm and its cartridge, Mr. 
W. C. Dodge says : 

"This is the perfected arm of the present 
day, 1874, the modern revolver in every 
detail. * * * * It has a flanged metal- 










church. Frank had never before heard such 
a report come from an onion. He ju nped 
over the fence, went up the steps and into 
his room, one time in three motions. He has 
not recovered from his fright yet. Edouard 
scaled the fence without touching it, went up 
the street as if Satan were alter him, and 
is supposed to be still runnirg. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



INDIAN GAME-BUTCHERS. 
A. S. Marshall. 

I am glad to see that you have taken up 
a serious question and one that I and others 
have been agitating for some time. I have 
been living for several years in the midst 
of the country infested by these Indian 
game-destroyers. Several of us saw about 
500 Indians in one camp, at one time, 
last fall on the Green river side of the 
mountains. There were over 100 lodges and 
about 2,000 ponies. The Indians were 
mostly Bannocks and Shoshones, some 
Utes and Arapahoes. A neighbor of mine 
and myself counted over 100 Indian hunt- 
ers, going out at once, on a hunt from the 
same camp. 

A number of citizens here would try the 
state laws more than they have done, but 
fear the government would put them to 
trouble for interfering with their wards. 

About 5 years ago I was camped on the 
head waters of Green river, Wyoming, 
hunting bear, in May. The spring was early 
for this country, and the Indians came over 
from their reservation in time to catch the 
cow elk when about to drop their calves. 
Any one acquainted with the habits of elk 
knows how poor and stupid they are at that 
time. They fall an easy prey to the Indian 
hide hunters. The hide is of little value then, 
but they kill them just the same. There 
was a party of 4 Indian hunters and their 
families there They had been in camp 6 
days when I visited them. One of them 
could talk fair English. I asked him how 
many elk his party had killed, and he 
said he had killed 20 and the others about 
the same each, making 80. No doubt, he 
told the truth, for the camp was full of 
hides. As I was going to my camp I 
met one of the hunters coming home to 
his, and he had his pony packed with 6 fresh 
elk hides that he had killed that day. The 
Indians staid there 4 or 5 days longer, 
and were killing elk all the time. They 
would then decamp to another part of the 
country for more slaughter. It is safe to 
say that they killed over 100 elk besides 
crippling a large number which would die 
afterwards. These were nearly all cows, as 
the bulls had gone high up in the mountains. 
No meat was taken from the main carcasses, 
but the cows were opened and the unborn 
calves taken. r l he sinew was taken from 
along the back bone, to be used for thread, 
and the brains were taken to be used in 
tanning. 

There is a basin on the Hoback river, a 
tributary of the Snake. In this basin and 
along the river is short willow brush, high 
enough to conceal the elk calves when 
young, but not the cows. Two years ago 
2 white hunters were in there hunting bear 
while the mother elk were watching around 
their calves. The men saw a party of Ban- 
nock Indians surround a bunch of 75 to 100 
cows, and commence shooting into them 



on all sides. The poor creatures did not 

know what to do. They were running 
hither and thither among their calves and 
falling fast from the deadly shuts of the In- 
dians' rifles. The scene was sickening to even 
these hardened white hunters, and they 
left before the Indians completed their horri- 
ble work. 

Anyone can rind antelope carcasses all 
over the range, when the Indians are hunting 
them, with only the hide, brains and sinew 
taken. They take unborn antelope the 
same as they do the elk. 

A party of citizens here arrested 4 Indian 
hunters and their families on one of the 
branches of Xewfork creek, in Freemont 
county, Wyo. After considerable trouble 
we got them started for Lander, the county 
seat. County court was in session at the 
time. When they reported to the county 
officials the court adjourned to investigate the 
matter. Their first idea was to try the - 
law, but I think they had fears that the l". 
S. Government might object. So they tele- 
phoned to the Washakie Agency and asked 
Captain Ray to come to Lander. In the 
meantime they made an examination of the 
Indians' outfit. They found game hides in 
abundance, also 4 hides of domestic cal 
Three of the hides had bullet holes in them. 
The fourth* had not any ; but one of the 
cattle-men present said it was the hide of an 
unborn calf. They had, no doubt, killed the 
cow to get the calf. 

When Captain Ray came from tin 
which is 14 or 15 miles distant, he seemed 
very indignant that his Indians should 1>«' 
committing such depredation, and said if 
the citizens would give him charge ol the 
Indians he would imprison them 30 days and 
never let them go off the reservation again; 
that he did not allow them to leave it at any 
time and had not given them p 1 do 

so; but when shown a pass bearing his 
nature that had been taken from one of the 
Indians the captain looked rather conJ 
and said he had forgotten all about it. 

I know one Indian on the Shoshone 
reservation, at least he is there in the win- 
ter, but off every summer hunting. The 
first time I saw him was He 

had a pass from the agent for the purposi 
hunting for 2 horses that he had lost. I have 
seen him every summer since, and he has 
had a pass each' year from the agent to hunt 
for those horses. Now mind you the 
in winter in the region where he claims his 
horses are, from 4 to 5 f < ow. Noth- 

ing but a snow-shoe rabbit or a porcupine 
can winter there; but game runs there in 
summer. I have seen many an Indian with 
passes from the agents similar to thai 

The U. S. Government is the only p< 
that can stop the Indians from destroying 
the game in this country, and it must be 
done before long or it will be too late. 

I have almost forgotten to state how well 
Captain Ray kept his promise m regard to 
punishing those Indians referred t". who 



1 86 



RECREATION. 



were given into his charge. Within a week 
from the time he took possession of them 
I saw one of them over 140 miles from 
the agency, with his gun, and 1 guess Cap- 
tain Ray allowed all of his Indians to leave 
the agency, for there were more Indians 
here afterwards than before; and the Ban- 
nocks are worse than the Shoshones. 



Gardiner, Park Co., Mont. 

Editor Recreation : 

It seems a pity that the otherwise almost 
perfect August number of Recreation 
should have been marred by the article en- 
titled " Random Shots." If the author has 
no delicacy about seeing his name attached 
to such a bit of romance, he should at least 
remember that the reading public likes and 
demands facts, and "facts" is synonymous 
with "truths." 

The truth sometimes hurts, but to be shot 
at (and hit) with an untruth, even though it 
be a random shot, is like being struck with a 
poisoned barb ; one may or may not get 
over it in the years to come. When Mr. 
Harper intimates that there are some guides 
in the Yellowstone Park, or Jackson's Hole, 
who have only a frying pan and a tin cup 
for an outfit, he knows he is getting danger- 
ously near the borderland of fabrication. 
His plea that they take along silver plated 
ware, was probably inspired by the fact that 
his Yellowstone Park guide was so equipped, 
and not only with silver plated table ware, 
but with enameled dishes, and bedding 
galore. 

Mr. Harper's advice to tourists to bring 
their provisions in boxes with padlocks, is 
quite refreshing. From much personal ex- 
perience I must deny that " the quality of 
the provisions of the frontier stores is not to 
be relied upon." On all sides of the park, 
and in Jackson's Hole, can his list be dupli- 
cated, " flour, corn meal, sugar, coffee, tea, 
chocolate, hams, bacon, jelly, jam, pickles, 
and olives," and a dozen other dainties his 
guide well knows of, if he does not. 

Our friend advertises the fact that he is a 
worshipper of the mighty dollar. Most 
pleasures are more or less luxuries. A trip 
through Yellowstone Park, Jackson's Hole, 
or to the Teton country, with private 
guides, is a great pleasure and perhaps to 
many a corresponding luxury to be seriously 
considered before being indulged in. Our 
friend's protest that overcharges are habit- 
ually made for horse hire in this country is 
hardly true, and his reasons for making such 
a statement are certainly illogical. He might 
just as well claim that because a city livery 
horse is worth only $40 or $50, to ask for its 
use from $5 to $10 a day "is clearly ex- 
orbitant." The guide's horses have to be 
looked after all winter. For each trip they 
are shod at an expense of $2 a head, and of 
all the horses belonging to the many guides 
I know, not one can be purchased for less 
than $25. Too often a guide will have out 



but one party during a season, and that one 
for only a short trip. 

Wishing only to correct the wrong im- 
pressions " Random Shots " may have pro- 
duced among your 10,000 subscribers, I reit- 
erate my statement that the grandest of trips, 
the best of guides, the best of horses for the 
purpose, the best of outfits, and the best of 
provisions can be had out here, and at prices 
so reasonable that, were they known in the 
east as they ought to be, the only difficulty 
would be the furnishing of guides and horses 
enough for the crowds that would come. 

R. D. 



Simon Pokagon, the celebrated Indian 
chief, residing at Hartford, Mich., in a per- 
sonal letter to me, says: 

I have read the article on page 95 of 
the August number of Recreation, in re- 
gard to the Indians killing game contrary 
to law: If you could have seen the destruc- 
tion of deer, elk and buffalo that I have seen 
you would blame my people less for killing 
game than you now do. When a boy I 
have seen white men kill whole herds of 
buffalo for the sport of killing, leaving them 
unskinned upon the plain. I have seen 
them destroy all kinds of animals and fish 
without any desire, apparently, to make 
money out of them, or to use them, but sim- 
ply to satisfy their greed for killing. The 
Indians have been taught by the white 
man to indulge in cruel, wicked, wholesale 
slaughter. Before the white man came 
among us we only killed what we ate, for 
we were taught that to kill more than we 
needed was displeasing to the Great Spirit, 
and would shut us out of the happy hunt- 
ing ground beyond. One young man was 
banished from his tribe because he waded 
into a lake, with his head covered with a 
bunch of wild rice, moved out to a large 
flock of ducks and took one after another 
by the legs, drawing them under the water 
and drowning them. In this way he caught 
and drowned over 100 ducks — a few more 
than are shown in the beautiful duck pic- 
ture in your August number. 

If white men fully understood how nat- 
ural it is for the red men to copy them, they 
would have more charity and far less re- 
venge. 

East Branch, N. Y. 

Editor Recreation: 

I have been a guest in this hotel for three 
seasons and have been fishing almost every 
day. I know of no place, within a day's 
ride of New York, where a sportsman can 
catch as many fish amid such charming sur- 
roundings. The town of East Branch is 
beautifully situated at the junction of the 
East Branch of the Delaware and the 
Beaverkill river, the latter being justly cele- 
brated as a trout stream. The Delaware is 
full of fine pools and deep eddies which are 
filled with small-mouth black bass, some of 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



187 



the best fishing points on the river being 
only half a mile from the hotel. 

The proprietor of the house, Jones, has 
boats in all these eddies for the use of his 
guests. The best months are July and Aug- 
ust, although many fish are taken in Sep- 
tember. The bass run from )/ z to 3 pounds 
in weight. This season has been about up 
to the average, an angler being usually 
able to count on a dozen good-sized bass in 
two hours fishing, a coat of sunburn 
•and the pleasure of seeing some of the 
prettiest scenery in the state. There are 
several trout brooks in the vicinity, which 
•in their season give the angler good sport. 

Ruffed grouse shooting is excellent here, 
and from the number of birds now seen in the 
wood there seems every indication of good 
sport this fall. 

H. R Blakslee. 



Editor Recreation 



Corvallis, Oregon. 



In glancing over the pleasing April num- 
ber of Recreation, I read with much inter- 
est Mr. Leasure's article on breeding Mon- 
golian pheasants, and beg to impart to him 
•and other sportsmen the discovery that has 
made all my experiments successful in the 
artificial propagation of these game birds. 
And really the manner of going about it 
must be left largely to the ingenuity of the 
breeder; but assuming you have the eggs 
well placed under domestic hens, the next 
thing is to build your coops and pens of 
closely woven wire, to prevent the ingress 
•of cats and rats, the natural enemies of the 
birds. Bear in mind that the chicks must 
have plenty of insects. Worms are my choice. 

One way of providing these is to place two 
beef heads in a large box of loose earth, 
partly covering them with same. Then let 
the flies do the rest. Maggots will hatch and 
burrow into the soil by the thousand. Then 
feed, say, two quarts of earth daily, and see 
the chicks scratch, feed and thrive. 

Another way : Procure two or more beef 
hearts and suspend them in the cages by 
wires through the apex a few feet from the 
ground. They will soon be filled with wig- 
glers, and a few taps with a stick on their 
sun-glazed sides will cause the maggots to 
drop to the ground, where a bunch of ex- 
pectant, bright-eyed, hungry and alert young- 
sters will be ready to receive them with open 
mouths. 

Still another way : Procure two kegs, into 
which table scraps, meat, etc., are dropped; 
half-fill each. When alive with larvae, 
feed a few dipperfuls to the chicks. By 
alternating — feeding from one vessel while 
the other is ripening — you will always have 
plenty of the necessary food handy. 

This may seem an objectionable way of 
obtaining grubs, but I know of no better or 
surer way of producing good, wholesome 
food for the chicks. By keeping the recep- 
tacles partly covered, and dipping from the 



windward side, it is not so wretched as one 
might suppose. 

This mode of feeding is absolutely in 
sary until the young birds are able to eat 
screenings, cracked wheat, boiled liver, et< .. 
and a few spades of earth turned over at any- 
time in their cage will produce an am us 
scramble for the insects iherebv brought 
to light. 

The chicks should have some (lose shrub- 
bery in which to hide and to produce shade. 
As they roost on the ground, the net t 
for excluding the rats is obvious. 

• M. H. Kriebel, 
Taxidermist and Collet lor. 



Helena, Mont. 

I am Chairman of the Board of < iame 
and Fish Commissioners. We find it diffi- 
cult to get the Boards of County Commis- 
sioners to appoint game wardens. The 

sheriffs do not consider the enforcement of 
the game and fish laws as part of their duties 
unless a warrant is sworn out or they ai 
tually see the parties violating the laws. 
Politics, of course, is cutting quite a figure. 
I have just had a rod and gun club organ- 
ized in Lewistown, and have them started to 
get a warden. Sent a man up about 
two weeks ago for killing a deer nut 
of season, and hope to have our laws 
erally enforced before all the game 1- 
killed off. The sportsmen of the state air 
up in arms. If our present laws were en- 
forced it would be worth several hundred 
thousand dollars a year to this state. We 
v/ould have one of the best game ami fish 
states in America, for all time. Big Spring 
creek, which a few years ago was full ol 
trout, now has scarcely any, but the ckickens 
are thicker than I ever saw them before 
around here. 

You may make up your mind that my 
subscription to RECREATION will t>< 
newed. H. V. Kennett. 



Carbondale, t old. 

Fishing has been fairly good in the R 
ing Fork and Crystal river the present 
son, and several family camps have been 
located up the latter stream for some 
weeks. The season for grouse shooting 
opens to-day and many a young chick 
be brought to bag by those who are so foi 
tunate as to enjoy an outing in the neigh 
boring mountain^ 

Elk, deer and grouse may !><■ found in 
and about Canal basin, the "muddy" Coun- 
try and at the head of Thompson « reek. 

Dove shooting has been indulged in b) • 
few of our local sportsmen. Mr. E. H. 
Gruble, of Mt. Sopris Farm, has had sev< 
shooting parties at his place, comj 
friends from Aspen, Glenwood Spni 
other points. J. H. SHI I khaki. 

WiIIonn ( ttjr, V !'. 
The bird shooting -<-; t son opened ii 
Dakota, August 20th, and will end 1 >- 



1 88 



RECREATION. 



ber ist. Prairie chickens are reported un- 
usually numerous in the northwestern part 
of the state. Travelers on the trains of the 
Great Northern road report seeing im- 
mense flocks. The food in the grassy 
ranges is plentiful, and chickens are seek- 
ing a living in the unsettled sections, rather 
than among the grain fields, presumably in 
obedience to an instinct of safety. The 
Turtle mountain people say there are more 
pin tailed grouse in that region than were 
ever known before, and when the ducks, 
and geese come from the north, sport will 
be at the best. 

The Supreme Court has decided that the 
law enacted by the last legislature, requir- 
ing hunters to take out a $25.00 license, will 
not be operative before December ist, the 
close of the shooting season. J. H. T. 

I am going to the mountains, on my annual 
outing, in about 30 days. I go prepared to 
enjoy the whole round of mountain sport. I 
take my family with me and camp till we are 
all tired. The little trout or the big salmon, 
the young grouse or the big grizzly, I am 
prepared to take. The big blue grouse are 
found everywhere. I get more sport out of 
this noble bird than from anything else. 
Hunting grouse is sport, while I balance 
up the hard work against the pleasure when 
I hunt big game. The bear js the greatest" 
of all big animals for sport. He is a fighter, 
and it makes me feel better to kill a ferocious 
beast than it does to shoot down a harmless 
creature. There are many bear in these 
mountains, but they are not easily taken, es- 
pecially as my pointers are not trained for 
them. Newton Hibbs, Lewiston, Idaho. 



salmon trout in Secesh creek, 8 miles from 
here. I have seen several that were caught 
there. M. W. Miner. 



Sheridan, Wyoming. 
A grand shooting tournament will be held 
here, October 8th, 9th and 10th, on live birds 
and targets, under the management of 
Frank S. Crabill and myself. Cash prizes 
will be added to purses to the value of 
$250 and we will have the crack shots here 
from Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, and 
the Dakotas. Reduced rates have been 
made on the railroads and shooters will find 
the best of hotel accommodations. The Sheri- 
dan Inn will be headquarters for the sports- 
men and the shooting park is near by. 
People coming from the east can stay over 
and get the finest kind of big game in the 
mountains near here. Mark R. Perkins. 



Warrrens, Idaho. 
This is a great game country. I may win- 
ter here. Was over on a fork of the 
Salmon yesterday and the boys there report 
elk, sheep and silver-tips numerous. I 
know the elk are. Friday evening Billy 
knocked over a black tail buck, on the run, 
with my little 25^ 25 Stevens, at 150 yards. 
How's that for a toy gun and- a tenderfoot? 
Mr. Cary should be here if he wants scenery 
to sketch. There are lots of 15 to 25 pound 



Ruffed grouse very plenty; lots of squir- 
rels ; quail scarce; woodcock quite a few. 
The trappers, who formerly have kept our 
mountains depleted, do not now dare to show 
up, owing to the stringency of our game laws 
and the efficiency of our game wardens, con- 
sequently the mountains are full of young 
birds. Good accommodations for sportsmen. 
D. B. Van Wagenen, M. D., 
Suffern, Rockland Co., N. Y. 



A sportsmen's club has been organized 
here, with 41 members, for the purpose of 
game protection and practice at trap shoot- 
ing. I had the honor to be elected Presi- 
dent ; Judge Wm. Neville, Vice-President; 
A. D. Williams, Secretary; and W. H. Mc- 
Donald, Treasurer. This club is much 
needed, for the prairie chickens were nearly 
all cleaned out last year and are reported 
scarce, thus far, this summer. The pros- 
pects for quail are better. 

M. K. Barnum, North Platte, Neb. 



The local papers in the Pecos valley, New 
Mexico, always parade the names of persons 
who go there to investigate the country. 
They formerly gave the addresses as well, 
but quit this lest some of the victims of the 
valley — men who have been there, lost the 
money they invested in lands, and have gone 
away again, may warn these same prospect- 
ors that the Pecos valley is a delusion and a 
snare. Surely it must be rather wearing on 
an editor's nerves to live in constant fear 
that some other fellow will tell the truth 
about his scheme. 



Have just returned from an absence of al- 
most three years in southern Oregon and 
Utah. Had a splendid time, with both deer 
and fish. Was with "Big Injun" (W. A. Mas- 
sie) one entire year in southern Oregon. Am 
laying out my winter crusade for trapping 
the raccoon, mink and otter, along the Okaw 
river of southern Illinois. 

Daniel Arrowsmith, Ellsworth, 111. 



The St. Paul Gun Club will hold its annual 
tournament at the Minnesota State fair 
grounds, midway between St. Paul and Min- 
neapolis, Sept. 9th to 14th. Reduced rates 
have been secured on railways, an attractive 
programme arranged, and a large attend- 
ance is expected. John P. Burkhard, 57 East 
7th street, St. Paul, is the manager. 

S. R. Scoggins, of Baltimore, recently re- 
ceived a white quail in a consignment of 
game from the west. The bird had the soft 
whiteness of a dove over all its body except 
here and there a feather which, in color, re- 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 






sembled chocolate with too much cream 
mixed with it. The size was normal and 
fully developed. The bird has been mounted 
and placed on exhibition in the Maryland 
Academy of Sciences. 



Two Medicine lake, St. Mary's lake, Flat- 
head river and lake, Kootenai river, Lake 
McDonald, and the intermediate Rocky 
mountain region of northwestern Montana, 
offer the finest hunting in America. The game 
in this vast territory is unsurpassed in va- 
riety and quantity, including bear, deer and 
every sort of furry, finny and feathery life. 

Many lovers of out door sports have 
visited this bountiful country, and have writ- 
ten entertainingly of it. Guides can be had 
at Blackfoot, Belton, Columbia Falls, Kali- 
spell, and other Montana points along the 
Great Northern Railway. For publications 
and further information, address F. I. Whit- 
ney, G. P. & T. A., Great Northern Railway, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



The fourth annual meeting and banquet 
of the Chesterfield Fish and Game League 
was held at Pine Grove Springs, Spofford 
lake, in August; about 50 members and in- 
vited guests being present. The following 
officers were elected for the ensuing year: 
Charles A. Harris, of Brattleboro, president; 
J. H.Stearns, first vice-president; Warren H. 
Butler, second vice-president; Frank G. 
Dort, secretary and treasurer; Charles G. 
Street, E. Whitney, A. T. Cobb, Geo. A. 
Nims, Charles Blandy, and D. W. Slade, 
executive committee. 

The work of the league in protecting the 
fishing at Spofford lake during the close 
season has been eminently successful, and 
the members are gratified with the result, 
which has been accomplished with a mini- 
mum outlay and with but few prosecutions 
for infractions of the law. Ample evidence 
of the beneficial nature of the league's work 
is offered in the fact that more and larger 
fish are being taken this year than ever 
before. 

Enclosed find $1, for which please renew 
my subscription to Recreation. 

I have been up here for a week — the para- 
dise of the sportsman for fishing, prairie 
chickens, etc. Our largest bass was 4 
pounds, pike 3^ and pickerel 9^ pounds. 
The weather is bracing, ducks are coming in 
to the several lakes and large bags are re- 
ported. Within a radius of 10 miles there 
are 10 or 15 lakes of various sizes. 

John S. Sargent, Detroit, Minn. 

Officer Petty, of the New York police 
force, for years a champion pistol shot, may 
be called upon to instruct the police in 
marksmanship. Commissioner Andrews has 
learned that some of the men do not even 
know how to load a revolver, and is consid- 
ering the necessity for pistol instruction. 



Claud Victor, a boy 15 years old, mail 

carrier over the '1 etc n range, killed a I; 
brown bear on his last trip, two days 
He saw the bear on a steep hill-side above 
him, and killed it with the first shot; but, in 
true hunter style, gave it another to make 
sure. There are not many hunters who kill 
their first bear at the first shot. 

S. X. LEEK, Mar wale, \\ j 



( mtario, Cali. 

A party of Ontario sportsmen recently 
returned from Ventura county, where they 
made a three weeks' hunt. We killed two 
bucks and numerous doves and squin 
We also found a bee tree from which \\« 
took about 12 gallons of honey. I saw full) 
1,000 valley quails, in less than an hour, in 
a canyon near the Santa Clara river, where 1 
was looking for deer. 

A. G. Allen. 



Warrens, Idaho. 
Stanton came in Sunday and said he sa« 
two big silver tips last week. Had no gun, He 
says the trout on South Fork average 01 
foot long, and salmon trout up to 27 pounds 
each. Sheep are also reported fairly plenty. 
Billy says he's going to get a silver-tip hiae 
and wear it to New York with me next 
spring. M. \\ . M. 

D. R. C. Brown, Harry Brown, Jack Wil- 
liams, Jack Atkinson and two friends from 
the East, left Aspen, Col., recently for a hunt 
in the northwestern portion of the State. 

Mr. Brown carried a Manlicher ritle, the 
only weapon of the kind known to be in 
the mountain region of Colorado State, out- 
side of army posts. 



H. W. Heffener, of York, and J. K. 
Painter, of Philadelphia, Pa., will he mem- 
bers of a party going to Montana, north of 
the Yellowstone Park, for a hunting trip. 
They will go to Red Lodge by rail, tin 
north on horseback. 



Governor Richards of Wyomii 
orders to have the Princeton student- 
rested for killing big game illegally, but the 
young men left the State before papers 
could be served on them. They escaped the 
penalty of their crime, but cannot 1 the 

odium of it. 

A moose came out the woods, at ( takfield, 
last Sunday evening, says the Bangor, Me.. 
Commercial, ran through the village to the 
Bangor & Aroostook railroad depot, jumped 
on the platform, and then Struck into the 
woods again. 

Subscribe for Recreai i«»n.Si. 

You will find it a good investment. 

Bound volumes of Recreatk ber, 

1894, to July, 1895, $2.50. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



Hackensack, N. J. 
Editor Recreation: 

Every summer I go to my old home in 
Stevensville, Sullivan county, N.Y.,and have 
a week or two at the pickerel. I have just 
returned from a trip there, in which 
there was no disappointment. Alight- 
ing from the train at Liberty, on the N. Y. 
O. & W. R. R., I ' was driven across 
country to Stevensville, on Stevensville lake. 
This lake is 3^ miles long. I get a boat 
for $3 a week, and good board, at the farm 
houses, for $5 a week. 

I took in five days 164 pickerel, weighing 
1 to 3/^ pounds each. On another trip I 
took 104 pounds in three days, and have 
made many good catches there. You can 
always rely on getting a mess of fish 
at Stevensville lake whenever you go, 
and if the day should happen to be cloudy 
I can guarantee you a good catch. If any 
sportsman desiring to go to this place will 
address me, I shall be pleased to give him 
any information desired. 

C. O. Gardner. 



Chicago,Ill. 
Editor Recreation: 

From a thoroughly reliable source I quote 
the following, in regard to the Wisconsin 
waters, near the Michigan state line: 

" Big Presque Isle, crab waters, the Ox 
Bow lakes, and all lakes east of me are 
being fished for market. From 100 to 600 
pounds of bass leave this station nearly 
every day from the waters mentioned." 

I know from experience that these mar- 
ket fishermen, in the northern Wisconsin 
and upper Michigan lakes, pretend to use 
hand lines only, but that they also use nets 
is absolutely certain. J. I. W. 

Messrs. Fred, and Benj. Adams, of Evans- 
ton, 111., and a party of Chicago gentlemen, 
went to the Turtle waters, Wis., September 
1st, after bass and muscalohge. 



Fred. Spencer, Vezie, Me., caught a sal- 
mon in the Bangor pool that weighed 27 
pounds. J. H. Gould, Bangor, caught 7 
salmon, and Mrs. Gould caught 1 that 
weighed 9X prounds. Michael Quinn, of 
the same city, caught 6 land-locked salmon 
at Green lake. 

A schooner lately landed at Bangor, Me. 
with 3,500 lobsters. 

Mr. J. B. Nellegar, of Chicago, has gone 
to Livingstone, Mont., for a month's trout 
fishing in the Rockies. 

Messrs. F. Blakemore and H. Haupt, Jr., 
of Chicago, returned, recently, from Glen 
lake, Mich. They report the fishing poor. 



Rochester, N. Y. 
I returned to-day from Lake Keuka, 
where several 2 to 4 pound black bass made 
me feel young again. Have accepted an 
invitation from the "Saginaw Crowd" to 
join their car party in October. 

C. R. Sumner, M. D. 

Roberval Lake, St. John, Quebec, 
Have just returned from a trip up the 
Mistassini river, 90 miles north of here. We 
had splendid luck with ouananiche. 

Harry P. Bigelow. 

Some years ago, while in one of the ferry 
houses at Jersey City one evening, waiting 
for a Brooklyn Annex boat, I observed one 
of the R. R. employees sitting in a chair 
looking down at his feet. The room was 
built over the water, and on investigation 
I found that this man had cut a hole about 8 
inches square in the floor and was fishing. 
He had a good string of tom-cods. He 
seemed confused and begged me to say 
nothing about it. Said he caught enough fish 
each night for his family's breakfast. 

Chas. Sully Wheeler, 

Washington, D. C. 

Lieut. W. J. Pardee, U. S. A., who is sta- 
tioned at Sackett's Harbor, caught, in the 
St. Lawrence river, yy black bass one day in 
the early part of August. 



Lena, 111. 
Have just returned from a fishing trip in 
Wisconsin where five of us caught over 300 
pounds of black bass and pickerel in two 
days. I am only 14 years old. 

Harry B. Nelson. 



If you have received a sample copy of 
Recreation that you have not ordered, 
look it over carefully. It is sent by request 
of some friend of yours who likes it, and who 
wants you to know of its good qualities. 
Why not show your appreciation of his 
kindness ? 



Received "The Big Game of North 
America" and never saw anything to beat it. 
Everybody admires it, even the ladies. 

Recreation for August also at hand, and 
I quit studying until I had finished reading it. 
H. C. M. H a i\j bright, Lancaster, Pa. 

I AM so much interested in "Cruisings in 
the Cascades" that I should be glad indeed 
to own all of your books. 

D. W. Pike, West Chester, Pa. 



In answering advertisements always men- 
tion Recreation. 




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192 



RECREATION. 



THE KIND THEY HAVE IN THE 
PECOS VALLEY. 

Charles Dudley Warner says : 

The signs of a coming dust-storm are many. 
The air is electric, a feather will cling to the 
fingers, the sky is oftimes gray and streaked, 
the children in the schools, even the prima- 
ries are nervous. Suddenly the bits of paper 
in the streets begin to whirl; soon you will 
see the dust coming like a rolling storm 
cloud; the sky is obscured; everything out 
of doors is "on the fly;" the slim branches 
of the scant cottonwoods slash the air, and 
if you are unfortunate enough to be out of 
doors, your eyes, nose and mouth will be 
filled with alkali dust while you are striving 
to make headway against a whirlwind. If 
you are under cover you will hasten to drop 
windows and shades; but the dust is so fine 
it will penetrate wherever air can. The pat- 
tern of the carpet maybe obliterated, and in 
some of the worst ones in New Mexico drifts 
are formed on the floor several inches in 
depth. 

How long does a storm last ? 

Sometimes an hour, sometimes three days 
—coming with great violence at intervals. 
We have known one that continued a week, 
with the exception of one day for a recess. 
The effect upon a nervous temperament is 
distressing. There is a desire to hide the 
head, like an ostrich; to creep into some 
hole, to cover the face so as not to see the 
wild turmoil of whirling things. The irrita- 
bility is so great with some persons as to 
culminate in fits of weeping. This is fol- 
lowed by exhaustion. 

A dust storm may occur at anytime of the 
year, but the spring is especially prolific. 
When the " Kamsin," the wind from the des- 
ert, "blows in," be it summer or winter, the 
worst kind of a storm may ride on its wings. 

The huge, cone-shaped mounds of ossified 
structure, which stretch for miles here on the 
plains, testify to the whirling winds that over 
a thousand leagues of desert have had their 
mad sweep for centuries. 

"THE LADY OF THE LAKE." 
Editor Recreation : 

In a recent number of Recreation Mr. 
W. A. Wheatley claims to have discovered 
errors of forestry in Scott's "Lady of the 
Lake." The memory of Sir Walter is sacred to 
all lovers of nature, and his wizard note has 
notbeen touched in vain. More than one heart 
has throbbed higher at its sway. Even were 
Mr. W. right and Sir Walter wrong, the for- 
mer should seek another theme for his pen 
rather than attack the " Wizard of the North," 
the beloved of all sportsmen. 

First — Mr. W. has discovered that "deer 
feed all night and lie in lairs during the day 
only." It is a fact well known to all practi- 
cal hunters that the deer's feeding time is 
governed, more or less, by the light and dark 
of the moon, and I have often found deer 
feeding in midday. 

Second — " Deer are never hunted with 



blood-hounds," says Mr. Wheatley. " Dogs 
bay only at end of a chase, when attacking 
wounded deer." At present blood-hounds 
are not used for chasing deer; but during 
the period referred to by Sir Walter they 
were used for strike dogs or cold trackers, 
being the keenest-scented dogs then known. 
They delight in following a cold track, bay- 
ing deep and long. As to hounds baying 
only at " end of chase, when attacking 
wounded deer," such are entirely different 
from any variety of fox or deer hounds used 
on the Pacific coast. The hounds used here 
give tongue freely while cold tracking and 
during the entire chase from start to finish. 

Third — "Winding the horn calls the 
hounds back and is to stop the chase." I 
have hunted with many hounds and good 
ones, too, that, once in full cry, all the horns 
in Christendom would fail to stop or call 
them back. Its blasts would only cheer them 
on; yet these same hounds would come read- 
ily to the horn the chase once ended. 

Fourth — "And it is the hound that snuffs 
the tainted gale." 

The tainted gale presumably referred to 
by Mr. W., and which the "hounds snuffed," 
must have been the scent of the deer left by 
his hoofs on the ground, or by his legs brush- 
ing by the grass or heather. If one deer in 
in repose would " taint the morning gale," 
one hundred men, one hundred horses, and 
one hundred hounds in the excitement of 
the chase would be more apt to do so. Men 
and dogs are the natural enemies of the deer, 
and a deer's scent is keen. 

Fifth — " So these blood-hounds were in full 
cry and chase before the stag had left his 
heathery bed of the previous eve." 

There is no reason why they should not 
be, as many hounds give tongue, freely, too, 
while cold tracking, and get over the ground 
rapidly. As to the matter referred to by Mr. 
W., I venture to say that they are visible to 
no other eyes than his own. 

L. L. Bales, Everett, W^ash. 



Readers of Recreation have long 
since learned that it can be depended on to 
bring them a feast of good stories and beau- 
tiful pictures each month. The November 
number will be fully up to the standard. 

It will contain a thrilling story of "A 
Mountain Lion Hunt," by Dr. Robert Mead 
Smith ; another of " Pheasant Shooting in 
Oregon," by Thomas G. Farrell ; " Trouting 
on Clark's Fork," by Gen. F. W. Benteen, 
U.S.A.; "Sitting Bull's Last Medicine," by 
Margaret Gray Brooks ; " Crossing the Plains 
30 Years Ago," by Gen. John Gibbon ; 
" Ducking off Machipongo," by W. J. Bogert ; 
and the continuation of Doctor Tucker's 
story; a delightful poem by J. B. Lozier, 
entitled "Autumn Days," and another by 
S. N. McAdoo, telling a humorous but 
pathetic story of "Hans the Wolf-Hunter." 
All these will be handsomely illustrated, 
and the departments will be brim-full of 
news notes relating to shooting, fishing, 
wheeling, photography, etc. 



GAME NOTES. 



North Platte, Neb. 
Editor Recreation : 

While shooting quail, grouse or ducks, the 
sportsman often comes unexpectedly on a 
deer, or other large game, and it pays to 
carry, in a convenient pocket, a few cart- 
ridges loaded with buckshot. 

I have made numerous experiments to 
determine the best method of loading buck- 
shot, to obtain the best pattern and penetra- 
tion, and will give the results for the benefit 
of those who have neither time nor opportu- 
nity to make tests for themselves. First, 
select buckshot of such a size as will ''cham- 
ber" at the muzzle of the gun. This will 
depend on the amount of choke and the 
gauge. If shot about three-tenths of an inch 
in diameter are used, four will chamber in a 
io-gauge and three in a 12-gauge. Three 
layers are enough for a load. This makes a 
io-gauge load contain 12, and a 12-gauge 
load 9 shot, respectively. For distances un- 
der 6o yards good results may be obtained 
by loading the shot in layers packed in saw- 
dust, to make them stay in place while pass- 
ing through the barrel. Each layer should 
be packed separately and carefully. A card 
wad should be placed on top and the shell 
crimped as usual. 

With this load, at 40 yards, my io-gauge 
gun put 11 and 12 shot in a 36-inch circle, 
and one pellet went through three inches of 
pine. At 60 yards, the same gun put five 
or six shot in a 30-inch circle and my 12- 
gauge gave a pattern of four to five, all pass- 
ing through an inch board. 

For distances over 60 yards close patterns 
can be made by loading as follows : 

For a io-gauge take a short piece of 12- 
gauge paper shell and put a card wad in 
one end to form a cup or case. Then load 
the buckshot in this as described above and 
place this case in the cartridge so that case 
and all will be discharged from the gun. 
If the case be made up with a wad placed 
over all, in the cartridge, it will generally 
fly like a ball up to 100 yards, and will 
bore a %-inch hole through the target. 
Sometimes one or two shot will escape and 
be found a few inches from the large hole. 

To make the shot scatter more put no wad 
in the top of the case, but put a card wad in 
the cartridge over the case. By this method 
of loading, I put eight out of nine buckshot 
inside a 30-inch circle at 60 yards. 

For a 12-gauge gun a smaller case and 
smaller buckshot would be needed, but no 
case should be used which cannot be pressed 
through the muzzle of the gun. Such a load 
will do terrible execution at ranges within 
100 yards, and with it a man need not fear to 
face even a bear. M. K. Barnum. 



best sport I have had in 10 years. In three 
days we took over 500 fish' that averaged 
about three to the pound. Not very large, 
but they made up in game what they lacked 
in weight. I used a 6-oz. rod. and found tli.it 
with 100 feet of line out, in the swift tide off 
Mattinecock Point, with two fish strikn 
once, it was great sport. My friend used 
heavier tackle and, consequently, caught 
the larger number, but with the light gear I 
used, think I had the most sport. 

The run of striped bass is now beginnin , r . 
On the 15th, George Murray took 15, runnin; 
from 1%. to 7Y 2 pounds, and to-day Charle, 
Valentine took 6 that weighed 17 pounds, 
altogether. 

Quite a number of loons are flying now, 
and coots, shelldrakes and black ducks are 
beginning to make their appearance. We 
have as good coot and squaw shooting here, 
as can be found on the Sound. They take 
lots of killing, and many a fair shot who has 
not been there before, is likely to wonder 
why they don't drop. It takes an old hand 
to bag three birds out of five. 
. I notice in your last issue the poor market 
shooter comes in for some more hot shot from 
one of your correspondents, but as tar as 
my personal experience is concerned, while 
it may be unfortunate that the manner in 
which they earn an existence takes away 
much game the sportsman would like to kill, 
yet most of them are better men than many 
of the people who term themselves sports- 
men. 

A. S. I). 



Glen Cove, L. I., Sept. 15, 1895. 
Editor Recreation: 

On the second of September a friend and 
I started in snapper fishing. I fish or shoot 
about four days out of five, but this was the 



PUGET SOUND NOTES. 

Seattle, Wash. 
Editor Recreation : 

Shooting in this State, since the openinj 
the season, has been accomplished under 
difficulties, owing to the lack of moisture 
and to the forest fires. The whole 1' 
Sound region has been apparently ablaze tor 
the past three weeks, and both game and 
property have suffered in consequence. 

Several of our local sportsmen are just 
back from Wilson's creek and vicinity, 
report chickens abundant, but con. 
in immense covevs along the creek beds and 
marshes, with few in their accustomed 
haunts. This is also attributable to the want 
of rain. Great numbers of deer and other 
large game have been driven from the foot 
hills by the fires, and have seemingly lost all 
fear of man in their efforts to escape from 
the flames. 

The State Sportsmen's Association me 
here, under the auspices of the local Rod 
and Gun Club, on the 27th of October. Ai 
rangements are being made for a three days' 
tournament, the time to be dh ided between 
live birds and inanimate targets. Several 
individual matches will lie shot for handsome 
purses. 



1 >3 



194 



RECREATION. 



I have sold to Capt. E. P. Miner my 
pointer dog, Yandell's " Daisy," and at the 
present writing he is shooting chickens, over 
her, on Wilson's creek. 

Salmon are running in large numbers in 
the Sound — in fact they are so abundant that 
they are being retailed on the market at 5 
and 10 cents each, varying in weight from 5 
to 25 pounds. C. B. Yandell. 



Editor Recreation : 

The rail shooting that' began on Sept. 
26 opened very poorly on the Hackensack, 
meadows this year, the weather being so 
warm and dry that the birds have not started 
south yet in any great numbers, 27 being the 
highest number shot on one tide here, Mr. 
George Van Buskirk of Hackensack and W. 
H. Smith of Paterson having tied so far on 
the highest score. Some parties have had 
very fair sport on the meadows without a 
boat, but using a dog to flush the birds. One 
party of three got 26. This is very differ- 
ent from last year, but birds will not be 
plentiful until we get a heavy north-east 
storm, which, I think, will bring them in 
great numbers. 

Fred. W. Beatty, Sec. F. G. P. Assn. 



Lewiston, Idaho. 
Editor Recreation: 

What is the matter with the Western dealers 
in sportsmen's goods that they don't adver- 
tise in Recreation? Everybody reads it 
out West, and we would prefer to buy our 
goods near home and not pay express char- 
ges from the East; yet the Eastern men seem 
to be the only ones smart enough to have 
found out the value of Recreation as an 
advertising medium. 

Western merchants are usually up to the 
times, but the sporting goods dealers appear 
to be in about the same condition as Rip Van 
Winkle was a few years before the Chicago 
fire. Mack. 



If any reader of Recreation wants a 
day's grouse and woodcock shooting, I shall 
be pleased to give him some good sport. If 
a man has a good dog for grouse he will 
have the best of shooting here, and by writ- 
ing me in advance, I can advise him when 
to strike the flight of woodcock, which is 
usually about the middle of October. 

Leonard Bunting. 

Greenfield, N. Y. 

Alfred Ward, of Kearny, N. J., went 
shooting on the Hackensack meadows. He 
fired at a flock of birds and, supposing he 
had discharged both barrels of his gun, put 
a new charge in each. Soon after he fired 
again, and the, gun kicked him into the 
ditch, broke his right arm, and cut his face 
and head. He may not be so pretty here- 
after, but he will know a lot more about how 
to handle a gun. 



Have just returned from the Megantic 
club preserve. Deer are more plentiful 
than ever. One party saw 37 in two hours 
jacking on the upper Spider river. Bears 
are also numerous. I saw 3 myself, at dif- 
ferent times, all within 30 feet of me. Fish- 
ing has been excellent, and many good 
catches, both of trout and togue, have been 
made. H. A. Wills, Plainfield, N. J. 



John Cherry and Ed. Hunter, of Jack- 
son's Hole, were out hunting for bear, up 
the Buffalo fork of the Snake river, a few 
days ago. They had just killed and were 
skinning a big black bear, when two large 
grizzlies walked up and invited death by 
standing around within short range. The 
three skins are worth about $100. 



Coot shooting is reported good on the Jer- 
sey marshes near Philadelphia, thanks to 
Game Warden L. H. Barrett, who has rigidly 
enforced the law during the close season. A 
party of Philadelphia shooters made a good 
bag, there a few days ago. 



Charles M. Spalter is reputed to have 
come off champion among the anglers at 
Granite Lake, Munsonville, this season, hav- 
ing captured the two largest black bass 
taken there. The trophies were landed 
within a few minutes of each other, their 
dual weight being in the vicinity of ten 
pounds. They were brought in with a 10 
ounce Horton steel rod, and the sport may 
well be imagined. 



Some years ago a man invented a fishing 
rod that registered the number of fish 
caught and the weight. He did not sell one 
of his rods. The modern angler does not 
want a returning board along when he goes 
fishing. 



A boy's fishing rod was fastened to the root of a 
tree on the river bank, and he was sitting in the sun 
playing with his dog. He had been fishing all day and 
caught nothing. 

" Fishing? " inquired a man passing. 

" Yes." answered the boy. 

" Nice dog you have there. What is his name ?" 

"Fish." 

" Fish ? That's a queer name for a dog. Why do 
you call him that ?" 

" 'Cause he won't bite." — Eric Messenger. 

May — Has your husband's stenographer returned 
from her vacation yet ? 

Mrs. Fleigh — I judge so. I just received a telegram 
from him saying: "Detained on important business." 
— Toledo Blade. 



In days agone when he had not 

The five-and-twenty cents, 
He watched the daily ball game through 

A knothole in the fence. 
He sits within the grand stand now 

And marvels much to know 
Why he seos not half of what he saw 

Through the knothole long ago. 

—Detroit Tribune. 



EDITORS CORNER. 






All true sportsmen, on both sides of the 
water, must deplore the sad farce in which 
the America's Cup races for '95 ended. 

The Earl of Dunraven insists that he is a 
true sportsman. I deny this. He is more 
like a big spoiled boy. He has allowed his 
temper to get the better of his judgment, 
and has made a spectacle of himself before 
the whole world. He came here, not 
simply as an individual, but as the 
representative of the Royal Yacht Squadron, 
and incidentally as the representative of all 
the best sporting blood in Great Britain. 
He got angry because the regatta committee 
ruled against him in the matter of a collision 
of the two yachts; and again because certain 
excursion steamers came nearer to his boat 
than he wanted them to come. Leaving out 
the question of the justice or injustice of 
either of these objections, a broad-minded, 
gentlemanly sportsman would have waived 
all personal pique or prejudice in the matter 
and have sailed the remaining race. Dun- 
raven, however, in the presence of 25,000 
people who had paid their money to see both 
yachts sail — some of them having come thous- 
ands of miles — yes Dunraven, in the eyes of 
the whole world, turns contemptuously away 
from the scene and says, "I'm mad because 
I can't have everything my way — I won't 
sail." So he goes away and sulks exactly as 
a big spoiled boy does. It is hoped that if 
other cup races are to be sailed here, or else- 
where, in future the Royal Yacht Squadron 
will select a man or men to sail them having 
more dignity and broader views of justice 
and of sportsmanship than Dunraven has 
exhibited in this case. 



The American News Company's order 
for the September number of Recreation 
was 5,200 copies. The order for October is 
6,000 — an increase of 800 in 30 days. The 
company buys 800 to 1,000 a month on sup- 
plementary orders, in addition to those 
obtained on standing order. Ask them 
whether this is so. 

During the month 557 new subscriptions 
have been received, making a total gain in 
circulation of 1,357 copies within the month. 
The edition for September was 12,000 copies 
and for this number it is 14,000. I shall 
crowd the 20,000 mark closely by Decem- 
ber. 

If you have anything to sell advertise it in 
Recreation. 

Mrs. Emma Shaw Colcleugh is cetainly 
a plucky little woman. She has traveled ex- 
tensively in the Arctic Circle, in Alaska, 
New Foundland, Hawaii, and in the Sas- 
katchewan and Yellowstone countries, car- 
rying a camera with her at all times and 
making careful notes as well as photographs. 
She has prepared a series of lectures on 
these various countries, which she is now de- 
livering in the East and which are beauti- 
fully illustrated with stereopticon views. She 
has written for Recreation a deeplv inter- 



esting story of an episode in her Hawaiian 

trip, which will be published in a future num- 
ber, and which will be illustrated from pho- 
tographs. Mrs. Colcleugh's add Box 
201, Providence, R. I. 



I hope the National Sportsmen's Ac- 
tion will take steps at an early day t< 
vide a permanent home for 11- h ;i^ 

that owned by the Cuvier Club <>! Cincinnati. 
It has long been a subject of remark thai 11 
this great city of clubs there is no ; 
where sportsmen, as such, can meet 
congenial atmosphere. 

If this proposition were once put before 
the craft in proper shape, there would be no 
difficulty in raising $250,000 with which t.' 
build and equip a model sportsmen's home. 
The coming winter is the time in which t<' 
organize the movement. Let a public meet- 
ing be called at once. 

Recreation has an actual paid circula- 
tion of 12,000 copies monthly. My subscrip- 
tion books are open to examination at all 

times. If any advertiser will select 100 names 
from the books, at random, and write the mei 
asking them whether they are subscribers t« 
Recreation, I will pay for stenographers 
services and postage both ways. If he will 
select the names of 10 men and telegraph 
them I will pay telegraph tolls both ways 
Is not this fair ? 



Commodore Prver, of the Corinthian 
Yacht Club, has had his usual success this 
season in racing. His yacht, the Euribia, 
has sailed in nine races, winning seven first 
prizes and one second prize. The Euribia 
went out of commission on the 23d oi 
September, and the other boats of tin 
rinthian fleet will follow in rapid succes 



The machinery for the next Sportsn 
Exposition is already in motion. 1 \\<> meet- 
ings have been recently held at which plans 
were discussed and suggestions madelook- 
ing to a much larger and more interesting 
exposition than the last. Another meeting 
will soon be called, whenfdecisive action will 
be taken. 

The Defender is all right when it comes 
to defending things. True, her armament 
maybe rather light for coast defence, but the 
chances are she will be able to protect our 
silverware for some years to come. 



Recreation is now snugly hous< 
new quarters at 19 West i\\\\ Si 
its friends will always be welc 
hours 4 A. m. to 10 P. M. 



Every sportsman to whom I 1 
has been in need of such a n. 
for years. Just to show how it take 
news stand, near me, the dealei 
month, and they are all gon> 
which they art received. 

C. S. Will 1 1 ER, 



196 



RECREATION. 



HE GETS IT ! 

Dear Editor : 

I've got it. It's Recreation. Please send 
along the year's subscription. 
Yours aff'ly, 

Roy Chasseaud, 

Aged 9 years. 

You~are right, my boy. Yours is the first 
correct answer, and you get Recreation a 
whole year. Here is how the thing looks in 
type: 

Picke R el 
Pik E 

C arp 
Pe R ch 
Suck E er 
B A ss 
Ca T fish 
Grayl I ng 
Tr O ut 
Ouana N iche 

I have received several other correct an- 
swers^which^came in the following order : 

C. T. Dazey, Haines Falls, N. V. 

Wm. A. Valentine, M. D., New York. 

Howard Brown, Bristol, Conn. 

A. H. Chadbourne, Philadelphia. 

Frank Schmid. Washington, D. C. 

Chas. R. Palmer, M. D., West Chester, Pa. 

A. E. Halbert, Norwich, N. Y. 
W. W. Fretwell, Savannah, Ga. 
Mrs. F. L. Fieting, Tomah, Wis. 
Chas. J. Newman, Oakland, Md. 

J. F. Hauenstein, Sheboygan Falls, Wis. 

Philip P. Leche, Erie, Pa. 

Chas. H. Terry, Reading, Pa. 

John Molineaux, Charleston, Mass. 

C. La Rue Madden, Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

Jack Taylor, Newburg, N. Y. 

F. P. Jackson, Schenectady, N. Y. 

J. W. Meek, M. D., Chicago, 111. 

Raymond Smith, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

N. L McCracken, Cedar Grove, W. Va. 

Jas. C. Spiegel, M. D., Middletown, N. Y. 

Z. Himelhoch, Caro, Mich. 

H. C. Wetmore, New York. 

Fred S. Tufts, Silver Lake, Mass. 

B. W. Severance, M. D., Mineville, N. Y. 
Edw. Holbrook, Seymour, Conn. 

C. A. Sprague, Haverhill, Mass. 
C. E. Wesley, Altoona, Pa. 
Elmer Breckenridge, Harbor, Ohio. 
S. Elmer Baxter, Keene, N. H. 
Deane Stratton, New York. 

H. B. White, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mrs. E. C. Brooks, Philadelphia, Pa. 

H. A. Hatch, Kirwin, Kan. 

Chas. E. Kelly, Passaic, N. J. 

H. W. Butts, Baltic, S. Dak. 

C. S. Bowman, London, Ont. 

M. K. Barnum, North Platte, Neb. 

Walter Morgan, Burlington, Vt. 

Tom Greathouse, Terrell, Tex. 

Ambrose J. Mabbett, Eau Claire, Wis. 

W. F. Daniels, Athens, Ohio. 

E. E. Lloyd, Rock Island, 111. 

John Potter, Colorado Springs, Col. 



C. M. Benedict, Salt Lake, Utah. 
Thomas T. Allard, Dedham, Mass. 
Mrs. F. C. Gilbert, Duluth, Minn. 
Harry Sims, Council Bluffs, la. 

E. A. Titman, Rahway, N. J. 
H. M. Brown, Waco, Tex. 
Thos. A. Harrison, Burnet, Tex. 
Benjamin Bacheller, New Hampton, N. Y. 

D. M. McLean, Sherbrooke, Can. 
P. L. Beal, Dresden, Ohio. 

E. H.Crahen, Beloit, Wis. 

Robt. J. Anderson, New Whatcom, Wash. 

B. P. Atkinson, Tilton, N. H. 
O. A. Bowers, Boston, Mass*. 

Henry L. Smith, Martinsburg, W. Ya. 
W. H. Louden, Middletown. N. Y. 

C. E. Godfrey, Colon, Mich. 
Charles Kinley, Seattle, Wash. 

Miss Nellie E. Brown, Haverhill, Mass. 
Sibley Brown, Little Rock, Ark. 
Fred F. French, Seattle, Wash. 

This proves several things : first, that 
Recreation goes into every State in the 
Union : second, that people read the adver- 
tisements in Recreation, for this puzzle 
was set in the midst of them ; third, that 
women and children read the advertisements 
as well as busy men. 

Moral — It pays to advertise in Recrea- 
tion, especially if you have anything to sell. 



A resident of the Pecos Valley, New 
Mexico writing to a friend, says: 

"Apple trees do not succeed at all in this 
country. Those planted last fall and this 
spring are nearly all dead. I am very 
anxious to leave here, and I am not alone in 
my wishes." 



RTPFIC' UrCQ Showy Shells, 
D1J\Uj CljVjO, Minerals, Fossils, 

Curios, Natural- 
ists' Supplies, Books, etc. Wholesale and 
retail. Send stamp for catalogue. 

WALTER F. WEBB, ALBION, N. Y. 

Amateur and Professional 

alike, cannot say too much in praise of 

THE NIDIOLOGIST, 

edited by H. R. Taylor, and Dr. R. W. 
Shufeldt of the Smithsonian Institution. 

The best illustrated and most interesting magazine 
devoted to the study of birds, their nests and eggs, 
ever published. Beautiful half-tones from photos di- 
rect from nature, aid naturalists, artists and taxiderm- 
ists, and delight all. The April ('95) number had Aw 
beautiful page plates ; the September number seven 
elegant half-tones. 

Subscription. $1.00 with premium and exchange 
notice free, or 60c. for 6 months. 
Sample copies, 10c. {No free copies.) 
Premium list for stamp. 

H. R. TAYLOR, Publisher, 



150 Fifth Avenue, 



New York City. 



BICYCLING. 



Tom W. Wheeler, of New Orleans, is 
wheeling around the boundary line of the 
United States. He started from New Or- 
leans March 14, and expects to make the 
tour in 300 consecutive days. He crossed 
Texas and the sandy desert of New Mexico 
and Arizona into southern California, fol- 
lowed the Pacific coast to Seattle ; thence 
east along the Canadian line to Bangor, Me., 
at which point he turned southward along 
the Atlantic coast, which he will follow 
closely to St. Augustine, Fla., where he will 
turn west for New Orleans. 

He weighs 125 pounds now, being 2 pounds 
heavier than when he started ; has the fifth 
set of tires on his bicycle which, including 
baggage, weighs 45 pounds. He must av- 
erage 66 miles a day to make the estimated 
distance in the time stated, and so far has 
held his average, being now just even. At 
one time he was two weeks behind. 

A movement is on foot to organize a body 
of military wheelmen. The idea is to have 
a national association, divided into state de- 
partments, and the committee believes that 
by training and drilling, abody of riders may 
be formed that would be of great service to 
the government in time of need. 

The committee consists of Capt. E. T. 
McCrystal, of the National Guard of New 
York ; Capt. W. L. Garcia, First Lieutenant 
A J. Griffin, and Sergeant Major H. J. Bar- 
ron, of the National Guard of Pennsylvania. 
Organized bodies as well as detached riders 
are invited to send in their names, so that 
notice may be sent them of the first annual 
meeting. 

Ride. Ride, Ride, 

From sunny morn till night. 
Over the country wide 

They are going out of sight ! 
And the bicycles speed on 

To the station under the hill ; 
But oh, for the voice of a wife that is gone, 

And the roar of a stove that is still. 

— Atlanta Constitution. 

The Western members of the L. A. W. are 
working up a movement in behalf of Second 
Vice-President A. C. Morrison for the presi- 
dency of the league. 



" Oh, John," said the new woman to her husband, 
" vou ought to see my new bicycle— it's beautifully 
tired." 

" It ain't half as tired as I am," groaned the hus- 
band, as he salted the biscuits and put sugar in the 
soup. — Atlanta Constitution. 



The first prize in the famous " Austral " 
race, in which Arthur A. Zimmerman will 
compete this year, will be $1,000. 



A new five-mile world's record li 
made. This time it is 11. \\ \ 
this it was 1 1.39 3-5. 

Louis Gimm completed a 24-houi bit 
ride to beat the world's record at Cli 
O. He rode 453 miles. The l.» ious 

amateur record was 407 miles and ■ 
and the professional was 421. 

Chairman Gideon, of the L.A. \V. Ra< inc 
Board, announces that the ten-mile competi- 
tive record of H. H. Maddox, made June 

15, 1895, at Manhattan Beach, N. Y., 2im„ 
39 3-5S., had been accepted by the board. 

There's a bicycle girl in Weehawken 
That has set all the neighbors to tawken ; 
This feminine biped 
Wears bloomers bright strip 
And red is the shade oi her stawki 
— New )'"){■ 

John B. Yates, of the N«\\ York A 
has ridden 10,000 miles during tin ~ 
He wins the N. Y. A. C. mileage medal. 

Mrs. Mary Gibbs, 75 /ears old, of One- 

onta, N. Y., challenges any lady of hei 
in the State to a bicycle race of one mile. 



Bicycle Lamp— Do you smoke : 

Carriage Lamp Sometimes 

Bicycle Lamp— Well. then, give me a litfht. 



The new officers of the Maplewood 
Wheelmen are : President, Dr. H. M. Car- 
penter ; Secretary-Treasurer, J. M. White- 
field ; Captain, M. Sammis. 



At a summer hotel in New Hampshire 
there are 60 boarders and 50 of them I 
bicycles. 

The membership of the L. A. \V. is now 

32,444. This is an increase of nearly 60 per 
cent, within a year. 

Recreation is grand and improves w th - 
number. A Hon \ki>. 

I received the copies of Ki:< Rl ITION I 
greatly pleased with them. 1 think ti 
magazine of its class i have evei se< 

Wm. Pbr< r> \i . Clinton, N > 

I consider Reckka i ion Ear ahead ol anj othei pub- 
lication of its class. 

M A Bati I, Star, 

Am much pleased with Rl H. 1 thh 

more entertaining than an\ 

I 

Recreation ia a Bparkl ng p;en 

j. 11. \\ m 1 1 br, Newburyport, M 

Recreation is the fines! 
Everyone seems delighted with it 
looked at it. 

\1 I'm 1 1 1 IPS, * t 

Enclosed find one dollar fo 
Recrka 1 ion for one year. N 
One need- onlj 
become a budsi ril ei 

I \\ ! 



197 



PHOTOGRAPHIC NOTES. 



HOW TO MAKE A SATURATED OR 
STANDARD SOLUTION. 

Take hot water (not boiling), add the 
chemical salt slowly, stirring constantly. 
Do not add more salt until each addition is 
perfectly dissolved. Continue the operation 
until water refuses to dissolve more of the 
salt. Test for temperature with thermome- 
ter. When solution has cooled to 65 degrees 
Fahrenheit, test with hydrometer for specific 
gravity. Refer to following table. Note if 
your hydrometer marks the degree of twad- 
dle called for in a saturated solution of the 
salt you are using. The percentage column 
gives the amount of salt in your solution. 
You can then easily figure the necessary 
amount of the saturated solution required in 
the particular formula which you may desire 
to use. Keep standard solutions in well 
stoppered bottles, and in a dark place. 

Use a Fahrenheit hot water thermometer. 

TWADDLE HYDROMETERS. 

No. I Twaddle marks from o to 25 degrees. 

24 " 50 



50" 80 

72 " 106 

100 " 136 



It is well for the photographer to own a 
complete set of hydromete'rs ; but >f your 
operations are confined to two or three salts, 
it is only necessary to purchase the hydrom- 
eter which will cover your work, and it can 
be easily selected by the aid of the above 
table. 

Specific gravity, degrees Twaddle, per- 
centage of salts of the formuia given, in a 
saturated solution of the salts named, at 65 
degrees Fahrenheit : 





1 


u 




73 g 




Formula. 




ft 


oTw. 


*• bo 

re 

u. — 1 

0) 3 




, 






«*-i 


ACID. 










Citric 


CeHsOyHaO . . . 


1.300 


60 


65.2 


AiUM. 










Chrome .... 


Cr 2 (S0 4 ) 3 K2SO4- 
24 H 2 


1.1-14 


22K 


21. 1 


Potash 


AI 2 (S0 4 )3K 2 S04- 
24 H 2 


1.060 


12 


11.5 


COPPER 










Sulphate .... 
IRON. 

Proto-Sulphate 
LEAD 

Acetate. C. P. 


CuS0 4 5 H 2 . . 


1.227 


45^ 


31.1 


FeS0 4 .7U 2 


1.244 


48^ 


39-7 


(Walpole) .... 


1.272^ 


WA 


jo-4 


Nitrate 


Pb(N0 3 > 2 .... 


1.442 


. 88% 


V- 


POTASH 










Bichromate . . 


K 2 Cr 2 7 


1.077 


iW. 


10 A 


Carbonate, 98 


K2CO3 


1.582 


nbV 9 


^2.1 


Oxalate .... 


K 2 C 2 4 H 2 . . . 


1. 215 


43 


So. 


Ferricyanide . 


K 3 FeCve 


1. 195 


39 


32.2 


Y. Prussiate . . 


K 4 FeCy 6 3 H 2 . 


1. 163 


VK 


2S.7 


SODA 










Acetate .... 


NaC 2 H 3 2 3 OH 2 


1. 174 


34 


S2.4 


Carbonate . . . 


Na 2 C0 3 .io H 2 . 


1. 194 


« 


47-1 


Crvs. Carb. . . 


Na 2 C0 3 .OH 2 . . 1 


1. 194 


-\m 


20.4 


Hyposulphite . 


Na 2 S 2 3 .5 H 2 . 1 


1-394 


im 


61.9 


Sulphite .... 


Na 2 S0 3 5 H 2 . | 


1.220 


44 


43-3 



It has been suggested that Jackson's Hole 
should be added to the National Park. This 
might work a hardship on some of the set- 
tlers, but would certainly add greatly to the 
extent and efficiency of our national game 
preserve. 



Salting and Sensitizing Solutions 
for Plain Paper. — The following gives 
excellent results on Whatman rough paper 
with platinum: 

Gelatine 115 grains 

Ammonium chloride 70 grains 

Water 20 grains 

Float paper two minutes in warm solu- 
tion; hang up to dry. The coated side 
should be marked. Sensitize by flotation, 
or by means of Blanchard brush, on a solu- 
tion of silver nitrate, 40 grains per ounce of 
distilled water. 

Paper should be used same day as made, 
or, if dried well, may be placed in calcium 
tube, when it will keep. If this be done be- 
fore printing, the paper should have a little 
moisture imparted to it by placing it in a damp 
place for a short time. Print fully. — Photo- 
gram. 

To prepare white ink, a mucilage of gum 
acacia is prepared, and with this is mixed 
zinc white in sufficient quantity. In order to 
make the ink smooth, after mixing the zinc 
white the whole is well rubbed with a palette 
knife or glass muller on a slab of glass. 
A few drops of carbolic acid is added as a 
preservative. 



Congress in the year 2,000. The Bloomer party was 
debating on its suffrage bill in a manner that 
showed the Man party that if something wasn't 
done soon their cause would be a lost one. The 
grim-visaged Senator from New York whispered 
something into the ear of the page standing near 
him, who then went to the rear of the hall. Just as 
the Bloomer party was about to call a quorum a voice 
yelled: "A mouse!"' Press dispatch — "Congress 
adjourned." — Syracuse Post. 



Copyright, 1894, by Walpole Dye & Chemical Co. 



Though yet a youngster I have had some experi- 
ence with rod, gun, etc. Recreation delights me. 
My imagination is with woodcock or trout while 
reading it, though in reality I may be burning mid- 
night oil. Enclosed find Si. 00. for which please send 
Recreation to my friend whose address is given on 
slip herewith. 

C. W. Broomell, 1804 Green street, Philadelphia. 



Recreation is all that its name implies. I would 
not know how to do without it. Our newsdealer here 
sells 30 copies a month. 

V. A. Biggs, Southampton, L. I. 



Showy Sea Shells, 

Minerals, Birds Eggs and Skins, Corals, Fos- 
sils, Curios, Glass Eyes, Supplies, Books, etc. 
Wholesale and retail. Send stamp for Cata. 

WALTER F. WEBB, ALBION, N. Y. 



198 



RECREATIOX. 



199 



U.S. 




RAPID 





H 





FOR 



Nitro 
Powders 



Penetration increased with pattern 15 per cent, improved. Results 

same with every shell. None so regular ever produced before. 

Head of shell and battery cup one piece of metal. No 

gas escape, no balling of shot, no upsetting of charge. 



U. S. CARTRIDGE CO. 



AGENTS : 

U. T. HUNGERFORD, 

29 Chambers Street, N. Y. City. 
CHAS SONNTAG CO., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Lowell, Mass. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



DANGEROUS WORK. 

From the Boston Globe. 

AmaLeur photography is doing wonders. 
Mr. A. G. Wallihan, the postmaster at Lay, 
Col., has given up the duties of the office to 
his wife, and is giving his attention to mak- 
ing photographs of live game. A year ago 
he made arrangements with a couple of noted 
Colorado guides, Messrs. Patterson and 
Wells, of Meeker, to go into partnership. 
He would take only his camera, and would 
divide the expenses. He would give the 
guides a share in any good photographs of 
live game they might succeed in getting. 

Mr. C. A. Hardy, son of Edward E. Hardy, 
who has done so much for game distribution 
and propagation, a senior at Harvard, heard 
of Mr. Wallihan and his adventure, and last 
fall decided to join an expedition with them. 
He only desired the game pictures, and did 
not go so much for shooting. The result was 
the killing of an enormous mountain lion, or 
cougar, by the young man, and the seeing 
of several others under peculiar circum 
stances. The beast shot was eight feet in 
length, and weighed 194 pounds. Its height 
at the shoulder was 24 inches, and the girth 
of the forearm was 15 inches: The animal 
was killed in the vicinity- of White river, 
Col., early last winter, and its mounted skin 
is now on exhibition in a store window on 
Washington street. 

The most wonderful feature in connection 
with the animal is a series of three photo- 
graphs made by Mr. Wallihan. The first one 
shows the animal treed by the dogs and look- 
ing from the branches at his pursuers. The 
second, and most wonderful of all, shows the 
beast in midair, actually springing at the 
photographer from the tree. The third pic- 
ture shows the animal down and being har- 
ried by the dogs. 

The validity of the photographs is vouched 
for by Mr. Edward E. Hardy, and the taking 
was witnessed by his son, who a few years 
ago obtained a picture of a flying grouse 
which his father was liberating — a picture 
which caused considerable comment at the 
time. 



St. Paul, Minn. 
Editor Recreation. 

Your department of amateur photography 
is always interesting and instructive to me. 
The suggestion made by a brother amateur, 
to keep toning bath cold by placing a tray 
containing bath in a larger one with ice water, 
is a good one. I do the same. My washing- 
boxes are made as follows : Make a box the 
desired size; then buy a piece of black rub- 
ber cloth in any dry-goods store; spread the 
cloth in the box, smooth it out, then tack on 
upper edge. This will make a good, cheap, 
water-tight box, and will answer the purpose 
as well as an expensive one. 



I have a Poco, 5x7, with R. S. lens, and 
during the two years 1 have dabbled in pho- 
tography it has given me a great deal of 
pleasure. I have enough pictures to pay for 
my instrument besides. So much has been 
said about using care in handling plates and 
chemicals that I wish to emphasize this 
point. Remember it takes patience and 
practice to get the hang of it. Always use 
the best of everything; by so doing you will 
be more successful and have fewer disap- 
pointments. 

E. J. Pauli. 

Dr. Joly, F. R. S., has lately made pub- 
Tic his discoveries in color photography, in a 
paper read before the Dublin University 
Experimental Association. He has succeeded 
in doing what has baffled all previous ex- 
perimenters in color photography. By his 
method only one plate is necessary to repro- 
duce any combination of colors. 'I he pho- 
tograph is taken in the ordinary way with 
an isochromatic plate, the only difference 
being that a plate, finely ruled in the three 
primary colors, red, green, and blue, is 
placed in front of the sensitive plate. Thus, 
three images, corresponding to the three 
colors, are obtained on one plate. A trans- 
parency is made from this negative, and a 
plate ruled in colors, similarly to the one 
previously used in taking the photograph, is 
placed in front of the positive, and the slide 
is now ready to place in the lantern. Thus 
it will be seen that Professor Joly's inven- 
tion is beautifully simple, while it yields very 
good results. The photographs of the spec- 
trum, various colored flowers, portraits, 
etc. which Dr. Joly exhibited with the elec- 
tric lantern, showed how truly the most 
delicate tints could be reproduced, and 
thus it is now possible to have permanent, 
reliable, objective evidence of color sensa- 
tion. As the chairman, Professor Fitz Ger- 
ald, remarked, " Professor Joly, the Experi- 
mental Association, and Trinity College are 
to be congratulated on one of the most re- 
markable discoveries of this century." — Pho- 
tographic Times. 

A Substitute for Distilled Water. 
— Fill a clean glass bottle with well water, 
add a few centigrammes of azotate of silver, 
just enough to render the water opalescent. 

When the salt of silver is perfectly dis- 
solved expose the bottle to the light until a 
blackish precipitate forms on the bottom. 
Decant the clear water, being careful not to 
disturb the precipitate, and you will have 
water which, if not actually distilled, practi- 
cally is just as good. — Photo Gazette. 

Will some one give me a formula to 
keep me from turning on the hot water fau- 
cet, instead of the cold, when washing nega- 
tives ? Hard Luck. 



RECREATION. 



\ n 



THE FOLDING MONTAUK. '95 Prizewinner. 

The Folding Montauk combinefi the experience of our friends with other cameras and our own insennlt] 
thnt it has all modern improvements and a number of new features. Ithasswines, adjii«tal.:<- fr.in 
own design. In finish it surpasses all others, and is undoubtedly a thing of beauty and a joy fort 

Will make Simp Mwtfl in all 
Kind", of Weather. 




There is Nothin? Kqual U our 

Camera. Don't take the 

so-called Just M <.o<«l. 



PRICE. 
Fitted with Gnndlacfc 1 
Rapid I{»-i tilim it i 
and Sliui 

For Pictures 4 x B, 

5 x 7. 

H x 10, 75.00 



Pointer ! 

You may be certain of i e 
thing, no Iau- 

ROSS, London made If you 
can afford it bl :^d to 

your cuinera at once. 



Invitation. 

Yon are cordially 
inspect our warerooms. the lare- 
estand handsomest In the world, 
and examine our complete 

of everything pertaining: to pho- 
tography. 



C. GENNERT, 24 a nd 2 6 East Thirteenth Street, New York. 

HUMANITY Mrs E amy's 

facial 
Jnstitute 



A MAGAZINE OF 

HEALTH AND BEAUTY. 



P ublished a t 254 West 23d Street, 



ZSTZHTW YOBK. 




GENERAL OFFft 

36 E. 23d Street. 



Price, $i.00 a Year. 



Ten Cents a Copy. electricity's great triumph. 



Editor, ELLA M.JENNINGS, H.D. 



Devoted to health and home 
interests men and women ; deal? 
with current topics of the day ; i^ 
bright, sparkling and healthful 
Fine illustrations. Now in its 4th 
year. Circulation, 10,000. 



Marvellous success in restoring 
the youthful contour of the face 
and neck. 

Wrinkles, blemishes, pittingfl 
and all skin imperfections | 
nently removed by one treatment. 



Best onai for reliable medical advertisers. 



To make Ourselves Beautiful \g a 
Duty, not Vanity. 

CONSULTATION FREE. 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 



PUBLISHERS' DEPARTMENT. 

The Winchester people are sending out a 
circular of new goods that is mighty inter- 
esting to riflemen. It describes the 25-20 
repeating rifle, which has been a favorite for 
a year or more, and for which a new cart- 
ridge has lately been put on the market 
loaded with smokeless powder. Then there 
is shown the model '94 repeater, made in 25 
and 30 calibers, and using long, slender cart- 
ridges that are pretty enough to wear on your 
watch-chain. Thirty-live grains of smoke- 
less powder in a 25-caliber shell will send 
the long, narrow bullet through almost any- 
thing that comes along. This 25-35 94 rl ^ e 
is about as near right for anything this side 
of an antelope as you can get. There is a cut 
and a description of a new cartridge made 
up for the 50-caliber express. It shoots 100 
grains of powder and a 450-grain bullet, and 
if I were an elephant I would strike for dark- 
est Africa if a man should come into my 
realm armed with one of these bone-smashers. 

There is a lot of information in this new 
circular that will interest you. Send for it. 
Mention Recreation. 



The American " E. C." Powder Co., of 
Oakland, Bergen Co., N. J., has lately been 
making large additions to its ^already im- 
mense plant, principally to "manufacture its 
new smokeless rifle and revolver powder, 
which is being loaded in large quantities, in 
nearly every caliber of cartridge, by the 
U, M. C. Co. and by the Winchester Co. in 
their 22 cal. short, 32 and 38 S. & W. 

These powders are at present supplied to 
the cartridge companies only, but will 
shortly be put on the general market. 

Most excellent results were obtained with 
the U. M. C. Co.'s 45, 90, smokeless cart- 
ridges, on bear and elk" last year in the 
Rockies, by Messrs. Geo. W^ork and Mr. L. 
Thompson, the well-known pigeon shots of 
New York. In many shooting galleries 22 
caliber smokeless cartridges have entirely 
superseded black powder, the absence of 
smoke and of fouling being a great advan- 
tage. 

Elizabeth, N. J , August 7th, 1895. 
Mr. Alfred Chasseaud, Manager Athletic 
Dep't Overman Wheel Co., N. Y. 
Dear Sir — Please send us by express at 
once two (2) dozen Victor League baseballs. 
It affords us pleasure to testify to the quality 
of your ball. We have used 7 dozen up to 
date, this season, and we are happy to state 
that we consider your ball the best that we 
have ever used. In weight, size, material, 
stitch, etc., it is uniformly correct; keeps its 
shape, and retains its life better than any 
ball we have ever been able to obtain. Re- 
fer to us if you desire. 

Truly yours, 

E. S. Coyne, 
Manager Elizabeth A. C. B. B. C. 



G. W. Cole & Co. 

Gentlemen — I use your "Three in One" 
on the finest rifles and pistols made, and can 
honestly say that it is the best rust preventive 
I have ever tried. Before I knew of "Three 
in One" it was my custom to fill the barrels 
of my rifles with melted vaseline before put- 
ting away; now I simply shove a rag through 
the barrel moistened with " Three in One," 
then wipe off the stock, lock, barrel, and all, 
which gives my gun a fine appearance and 
keeps it absolutely free from rusting. 
Truly yours, 
Chas. T. Rolf, 10 Piatt St., New York. 



Mr. E. D. Corwin, Lake City, Minn., 
speaking of the house advertised for sale on 
another page, says: 

" If a sportsman should purchase this 
property, he would find, within a radius of 
12 miles, both in Minnesota and Wis- 
consin, all the fish and game desired to make 
him happy; besides owning one of the hand- 
somest houses in the Northwest, situated in 
one of the most picturesque spots on Lake 
Pepin." 

I have often hunted and fished in that re- 
gion, and can corroborate every word of this 
from personal experience. 



The finest catcher's glove ever made has 
just been put on the market by the Over- 
man Wheel Company. It is on a par with 
their unequaled Victor ball. This glove, 
besides being made of the finest material, 
has a ready-made hollow palm, thus saving 
the user the labor and time of breaking it 
in. It also has a strap to hold the thumb 
and prevent its being knocked back by foul 
tips and wild pitches. 



The Daimler Motor Co. has ordered six 
horseless carriages from Paris, and they will 
soon be spinning up and down the boule- 
vard. This company is also putting in ma- 
chinery with which to build these carriages. 
The bicycle has set the horse away back, and 
when the new carriage gets fairly on the 
market the only job he will have left will be 
that of being made into beef for boarding 
houses. 



Hermann Boker & Co., 101 Duane 
street, New York, have secured the Ameri- 
can agency for the Harnel rifle, which is 
built on the Mannlicher system. It is of 30 
caliber, and uses the new smokeless powder 
cartridge with nickel mantled bullet. Send 
for a circular. Mention Recreation. 

Mr. A. P. Pentz, a son of Jacob Pentz, is 
traveling for Spratts, on the territory lately 
covered by Mr. Ehrmann. Mr. Pentz is a 
lover of the dog and should find his new field 
a congenial one. Recreation wishes him 
a large measure of success. 



RECREATION. 




tt? 







SMOKELESS POWDER 

has won the summer season at Hurlingham and the Gun Club 
nearly three times as much as any other single Powder and 
far more than all other Powders combined. A proof of its 
perfect regularity and great penetration. 

THE AMERICAN "E. C." POWDER CO., Limited, 

OAKLAND, 
For Sale by all Dealers. BERGEN COUNTY, N. J. 

O range "E xtra" P owder. 

PATENTED APRIL 17, 1888. 

THE BEST BLACK POWDER made for general shooting with sho' gun or rifle. 
Quick and strong, and burns with perfect combustion. VERY LITTLE SMOKE which 
is almost instantly dissipated. 

Oram Liiltiini, Orange Bicliii, Drain Special Powder. 



"TROISDORF," 

Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 



Less Smoke, less Recoil, less Noise, and 
less Residuum than any Powder in use 
It will not corrode the barrel of the gun. 
It is not explosive except when loaded in a 
shell and fired by a cap. 



LAFLIN & RAND POWDER CO., 

New York Office: 99 Cedar Street. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

St. Louis, Chicago, Cincinnati, Dubuque, Pittsburg, Baltimore, 

Nashville, Denver, Boston, New Orleans. 



^"Send postal card for illustrated pamphlet, showing sizes of grains of 
Powder. MAILED FREE. 



X 



RECREATION. 







Tapestry Painting, 
"IRISH PEASANT LIFE." 

DOUTHITT'S MANUAL OF ART 

DECORATION 

The Decorative Art Book of the Age. 200 
royal quarto pages. 50 full-page original illus- 
trations of unique interiors and tapestry stud- 
ies. $2.00. 

A TRIP TO THE INTERIOR WORLD 

3 18 octavo pages. 45 original illustrations. $2.00. 



Finest Assortment in America. Send for 
circular. 

DECORATIONS 

Write for color schemes, ""designs, esti- 
mates. We are educating the people in 
color harmony. Relief, wall paper, stained 
glass, carpets, furniture, windcw shades, 
draperies, etc. Pupils taught decoration. 
Send for circular. 

WALL PAPERS 

New styles, choicest colorings, designed 
by gold-medalists, frcm 3 cents a roll up. 
10 cents for samples. Send for circular. 

r ART SCHOOL 



"Six 3-hour tapestry-painting lessons, in 
studio, $5.00. Complete instruction by mail, 
$1.00. Full-size drawings, paints, brushes, etc., 
supplied. Nowhere, Paris not excepted, are 
such advantages offered pupils. Send for 
circular. 

TAPESTRY MATERIALS 

We manufacture tapestry materials. Su- 
perior to foreign goods, and half the price 
Book of samples, 10 cents. Send for circular' 



American Tapestry and Decorative Company. 

286 Fifth Ave., 
NEW YORK. 



J. F. D°HL hitt - 






RECREATION. 



XI 




Premo 
Camera 

BEST FOR THE SPORTSMAN. 

Owing to its extreme compactness, portability and ease of manipu- 
lation, the PREMO, is especially adapted for the use of all 
Sportsmen. Just think of a complete 4x5 Camera, measuring 
only 4%x5^x6K inches, and weighing but two pounds. The 
IDEAL CAMERA for Tourists, Bicyclists, Canoeists, Camping 
Parties, etc. 

pREToTiMmET Rochester Optical Co., 

Giving Full Particulars. ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



THE ONLY PERFECT FISHING LINE 



IS THE 



—Natchaug-- 
Braided Silk Line. 



Made from the choicest stock braided ij-strand three-cord silk. They will outwear 

three ordinary lines. Spool perfectly when in use. 

Never flatten or become water soaked. 

THE NATCHAUG WATERPROOF BAIT AND FLY LINES 

Will float on the water. The finish cannot be broken. Those who have used them will have no 
Others. Send four cents for samples and prices and pamphlet containing our awards of prize* for 
last season. FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS. Manufactured by 



THE NATCHAUG SILK CO., Willimantic, Conn. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 213-215 FIFTH AVENUE. 



Xll 



RECREATION. 



1? 



THE ENTIRE LENGTH OF 

The Beautiful 
Mohawk Valle)/^ 

is traversed bv Nne. C — / ^ 

nkwk 



is traversed by the 



'4m* 




The Scenery of the New York Central, enhanced by rich autumnal 
tints of sky and foliage, attains perfection in the month of October. 

A trip at this season, through the Mohawk Valley and along the 
historic Hudson River, has been appropriately termed, 

«* "A TREAT FOR ARTISTS." * 

Copyright, 1895, by Geo. H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent for New York Central & Hudson River Railroad. 



RECREATION. 



XI 11 



THE "DAVENPORT" SINGLE GUN. 

MODEL '94. EJECTOR. 




T— T AS detachable barrel, with heavy lug securely bolted, and having extra strong screw key fastening V raine 
■*■ A either nickel-plated or casehardened, top snap action, rebounding lock, automatic ejectoi posil 
action and perfectly reliable, drop forged steel parts, extra heavy fine steel barrels, 30 inch, carefully choke 
bored, finely checkered pistol grip stock, rubber butt plate and fancy checkered fore-end. Thoroi 
grade in finish and detail. Furnished in 12, 16 and 20 gauge. Weight, 5% to 6% lbs. 
This and other standard shot guns and rifles, made bv 

THE W. H. DAVENPORT FIRE ARMS CO., 
Send for Catalogue.! NORWICH, C O ISJ IN . 

Ejector Guns ^<\x GOOD NEWS FOB SPOBTSMEN. 

110 longer a. ^jmi HpP* Lefever Automatic Ejector Guns at a price 

lliyiirv ^t&^£± v§kj^^^^^ within the teach of every sportsman. 

Our New Ejector Movement 
Has only two pieces: One in ttie 
Hammer, One in 
(lie Frame. 

., ._._,;, __^ -.-*..■,.. We have decided :. meet 

~^^^\^gjj£g^ the demand for mtdi'im puce 

yJ^ ^^fe Electors, and are now pre- 

pared to accept ord< 
I I N s OF THOUSANDS IN USE. ^§ »^ all grades of our hamn-- 

Send for Catalogue. ^|§pr ™ guns fitted with 

LEFEVER ARMS CO., - - Syracuse, N. Y. 

[Mention Recreation. ] 

Date, 199S, 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 19 West 24th St., New York : 

Herewith find One Dollar, for which please send me RECREATION 

for one year beginning with , number. 

Name, - 

Remit by P. 0. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT AND SEND IN. 




X 1 V 



RECREATION. 



BOOK REVIEWS. 

If you would like to camp in the big woods 
of Maine but cannot; or if you have lived in 
them at some time and wish to recall memo- 
ries of them, read " The Aroostook Woods." 
Its author, Charles C. West, is a thorough 
woodsman. Every page is replete with the 
craft of the forests, with minute knowledge 
of bird and animal life, and with wise sug- 
gestions for those who would camp, hunt, 
fish, trap, or ply the paddle. Every reader 
will long to imitate this lover of Nature and 
live among the woods he so enticingly de- 
scribes. Illustrated. New England News 
Co., Boston. 



" Days of My Life," By John Bickereyke, 
author of "The Book of the Ail-Around 
Angler," etc. Illustrated. Si. 75. Longmans, 
Green & Co., New York. 

A charming volume of angling stories. 
M r. Bickerdyke prefers casting flies for trout, 
but has taken all kinds of fish, with all kinds 
of bait r in all kinds of waters, fresh and salt, 
in England, Scotland, Wales, and even Ger- 
many. He gives much information and de- 
lightful entertainment in this new book, 
which all anglers should read. 



"An Errant Wooing" is a* new and de- 
lightful story by Mrs. Burton Harrison, 
the popular writer of so many New York so- 
ciety novels. It has just finished its course 
as a serial in The Century Magazine^ and is 
now printed in book form, with the addition 
of about 20 full-page illustrations. The book 
is a romance of travel, opening in London 
and continuing in Tangier and Southern 
Spain. During the course of its serial pub- 
lication it has received high praise from the 
critics, and a large sale is predicted for it in 
book form. The illustrations include photo- 
graphic reproductions of views of Gibraltar, 
Tangier, the Mosque at Cordova, the Bull 
Ring at Seville, the Alhambra, etc. Pub- 
lished by the Century Co., New York. 



"THREE" ONE" 

—I Dreshertown Pa., 9,10-9;. 
g G. W. Cole fr Co., 
q Gentlemen: I have used many 
rn kinds of gun oil, but find yours 
_ ahead of all. Can recommend 
^ it to all for lubricating and rust 
> preventive, knowing it to be all 
7- that is claimed for it. I have 
? shot at trap all day in a pouring 
rain with a bright, polished gun 
and cleaned at night with " 3 in 
1," and never rusts; I endorse 
it as a long felt want if only 
tried. Yours truly, 

Irvin Houpt. 

Send 10c. in stamps for sample. Manufactured by 

G. W. COLE & CO., 1 1 1 B'way, New York. 

Ask your dealer for it. 




DRY MATCHES! 



IN THE 



Perfection Water=Proof 
flatchbox. 




Indispensable to sportsmen who hunt, fish, trap, 
camp or sail. 

Size, 2^ inches long, % inches diameter, beautifully 
nickel-plated. Price $1, postage prepaid. Order at once. 

You can fill this box with matches, lay it in water 
over night, and the next morning they wiil light as if 
they had been kept in a potvdei magazine. 

J. R. PAINTER, 

Manufacturer and Importer of Musical 
Boxes, Etc. 

1229 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THe mum - - 

s 





PUBLISHED AT 

254 West 23d Street, 

NEW YORK. 



Price, $1.00 a Year, Ten Cents a Copy. 

It is a Woman's Forum for the 
debate of important questions, an 
epitome of literature, current 
events and matters of interest to 
womankind. Illustrated. 



Editor of Literary Part : 

Mrs. HELEN KENDRICK JOHNSON. 



NOW IN ITS 10TH VOLUME. 
CIRCULATION, 10,000. 

Excellent Advertising Medium for Ladies and 
Family Trade. 

" Remember, Maud, I am no more 
Plain Charlie Brown, but ' Mr.' 

Unless you will consent to be 
My wife, and not my Sr." 

And Maud consented then and there, 
And Charlie Brown then Kr. 

— Halifax Herald. 



RECREATION. 



xv 



TTrigeetta do you Know? 



In this preparation are combined the remedies 
which above all others have been established as in- 
valuable in the treatment of the various forms of 
digestive disorders — Pepsin, Bismuth and Nux Vom" 
ica. The Pepsin used is concentrated and of the 
highest digestive power. The Bismuth is the purest 
the market affords. The Nux Vomica is the best Eng- 
lish extract. The efficacy of this combination lies in 
its triple effect — that of the actual solvent action of 
the Pepsin on all articles of food, the prevention of 
fermentation and formation of gases by the Bismuth, 
and the stimulant effect of the Nux Vomica (which is 
undoubtedly the best known tonic for nervous dys- 
pepsia) on the secretion of the digestive fluids. 
H- — 

A Remedy for Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Headache, 
Heartburn and Sonr Stomach. 

Will Restore Rosy Cheeks, Elastic Step 
and Happy Spirits. 

H- — 

PRICE, 25 6* 50c. PER BOTTLE, POST PAID. 

A. J. MTMAN, Chemist, 

2 Barclay Street, New York. 

M.R.PERKINS, 

SHERIDAN, WYOMING, 

KEEPS A FULL AND COMPLETE LINE OF 

GUNS, CARTRIDGES, 

Fishing Tackle, 

XX T E N T S, XX 

Saddles, Harness, Horse Clothing, 

and everything in the line of 

SPORTSMEN' S S UPPLIES. 

Tourists and sportsmen visiting the Yellowstone 
Park or the Great Hunting Grounds of Wyoming, can 
And here everything needed in the way of an outfit, at 
eastern prices with freight added. 



All Kinds of Large and Small Game. 
Excellent Mountain Trout Fishing. 

GUIDES, TEAMS, SADDLE & 
PACK ANIMALS FURNISHED. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



that the 

HANNAFORD 

VENTILATED RUBBER BOOTS 

are worn at all seasons with 




Absolute Comfort. 

NO SWEATING. 

A.sk your dealer for them , 
or send for catalogue. 

HANNAFORD 
VENTILATED' 

BOOT CO., 79 MILK ST,, BOSTON. 



JAMES E. THURSBY, 

45 Broadway, N. Y. 

Railway Equipment 
and Supplies 

Correspondence Solicited. 




The IDEAL BOOT 

and SHOE tor Sill. I. 
HUNTING are All 
SOLUTELY NOISE- 
LESS. 

Uppers made of ti 
quality heavy Horse II 
Colors, dark gray and bla< k. 
tanned and finished 
as Buck or M ither, 

softas a glove, tough enough 
to stand the wear and tear of briars and finish, DO 
exposure to repeated wettings will ever harden 
a peculiar and new process, the uppei > render 
tirely waterproof. 

The experience and suggestions of very many ci 
and experienced Hunters combined, has result 
the production of this, The Ideal Hunting Shoe, 
pronounced by all who Ret them the Climax ol 
Making. The bottom is wide, made up.it t ■ 
soles, rubber cemented together, hall an 
impervious to wet. will not glaze and -1 p Electric- 
Sole is a new process tanned COW HID 
easy as a Moccasin, as substanl 
and exceedingly light in weight. And all th< 
put together in workmanlike manner, 
perfect in every detail, \ 
able for any occupation requii 
tramping, or exposure ol any kind I 
10 inches high, eyelets and stu 
lined throughout with rubbei cloth, p 
sweat. The Boot is 18 mi 
laced at top outside to tighten t tl • ■ 
you want heels or spring heels, ai 
Hob Nailed. Also . 
of heel with other mea 
wanted. Willsendthis Ideal Lace Shoe 
on receipt of $7.50. The Ideal Boot 
$10.00. If made to measure, will delh 
First class sporting 
for samples and terms. 

rvi. a. srviiTM, 

Manufacturer of Shoe Specialties, Gymnasium 

and Sporting Shoes, 
25 & 27 North 13th Street, Philadelphia, Pa, 



XVI 



RECREATION. 



TAXIDERMISTS' 




SUPPLIES. 

Artificial Glass Eyes 

For Stuffed Birds and Animals. 

OOLOGISTS' AND ENTOMOLOGISTS' 
SUPPLIES. 

Send 2-c. stamp for Taxidermists' Catalogue to 

FRED. KAEMPFER, 

TAXIDERMIST, 

2\X Madison St., . . Chicago, 111. 

All specimens of natural history prepared 
and mounted true to nature in the best style of 
art and at reasonable prices. 



SYNONYMOUS ! 

PURITY 



AND 



Walpole Double Refined Chemicals. 



Pioneer "Hypo" Plant in America. 



\A/alpole Chemical Co., 

(Business Founded 1870.) 

WALPOLE, riASS. 

v . > 

G. GENNERT, 24 EAST J3TH STREET, NEW YORK. 

EASTERN AND SOUTHERN TRADE AGENTS. 



"DIETZ" 

TUBULAR HUNTING LAMP. 

PATENTED. 

Looks like a locomotive head-light. 

It will not blow nor jar out. 

The hood over the front works perfectly and with- 
out noise. When the hood is down no light escapes. 

It will throw a powerful light 200 feet. 

It burns kerosene oil, and will burn 10 hours with- 
out re-filling. 

i 11 INCHES HIGH.1 U INCHE8 IN DIAMETER. WEIGHT^ 1-2 LBSv I 

It is compact and handsome. Has a ball and can 
be used as a hand and wall lantern in camp. Gives a 
brilliant light, and is absolutely safe. 



Price $4.00 

Will be sent by mail or express, prepaid, anywhere 
in the United States or Canada, on receipt of price and 
50 cents for postage or expressage. 

R. E DIETZ CO.,60LAIGHT ST., NEW YORK. 





ISHINf.^ 

MANCHESTER?VT>^ 



RECREATION. 



XV 11 



f HAT Sit 



They're all talking about it, 

and they say it's a dandy. 
THE "IDEAL" 

LOADING MACHINE 

Is the only one that will handle all kinds of powder correctly. 
IDEAL. HAND BOOK, No. 5, just out. 80 pages of solid in- 
formation on loading shells, etc. Stamps for postage acceptable. 
IDEAL MFG. CO., Drawer 86 New Haven, Conn., U.S. A. 




LOOK 

AT THE 

PRICE. 



[Mention Recreati 



BOOKS BY G. 0. SHIELDS. (COQUINA.) 



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THE BIG GAME OF NORTH AMERICA. 

Its Habits., Habitat, Haunts, and Characteristics. How, When and 
Where to Hunt it. 

8to, 600 Pages, 80 Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5.00. 
Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CRUISINGS IN THE CASCADES. 

A Narrative of Travel, Exploration, Amateur Photography, Hunting 

and Fishing, with Special Chapters on Hunting the Grizzly Bear, 

the Buffalo, Elk, Antelope, Rocky Mountain Goat, and 

Deer ; also on T routing in the Rocky Mountains ; on a 

Montana Roundup ; Life among the Cowboys, 

etc. 

12mo, 300 Pages, 75 Illustrations. Cloth, $2 ; Half Morocco, $8. 
AMERICAN GAME FISHES. 

How, When and Where to Angle for Them. 
8to, 400 Pages, 50 Illustrations. Cloth, $2.50 ; Half Morocco, $4.00. 



HUNTING IN THE GREAT WEST. 

(RUSTLINGS IN THE ROCKIES.) 

Hunting and Fishing Sketches by Mountain and Stream. 
12mo Cloth. Over 300 Pages, Illustrated. Price, 75 Cents. 

THE AMERICAN BOOK OF THE DOG. 

The Origin, Development, Special Characteristics, Utility, Breeding, 

Training, Diseases, and Kennel Management of 

all Breeds of Dogs. 

8to, 650 Pages, 100 Illustrations. Cloth, $3.50 ; Half Morocco, $5 ; 

Full Morocco, $6.50. 



CAMPING AND CAMP OUTFITS. 

A Manual of Instruction for Young and Old Sportsmen. 
12mo, 200 Pages, 30 Illustrations. Cloth, $1.25. 

THE BATTLE OF THE BIG HOLE. 

History of General Gibbon's Engagement with the Nez Perce Indians 
in the Big Hole Basin, Montana, August 9, 1877. 
12mo. 150 Pages, Profusely Illustrated. Cloth, $1. 



These books will be mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the 

author. — _, _ ... — ,—, «-» 

G. O. SHIELDS, 

19 WEST 24TH STREET. NEW YORK. 



T3 u 

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CJ W, W £_ 

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XV111 



RECREATION. 




RESIDENCE OF E. D. CORWIN, LAKE CITY, MINN. 



FOR SALE 



A new house containing 10 rooms, 6 on first floor and 4 on second; closet in every 
room with window in each; central hall with Queen Anne stairway. All finished in natural 
hard woods; sycamore in parlor; red gum wood or hazel in library; dining and bathrooms 
in oak ; bedroom on first floor in birch ; kitchen and pantry in hard pine, furnished with 
plenty of drawers and shelves ; halls and second floor in ash. Bronze hardware and trim- 
mings throughout. Bathroom has open sanitary plumbing ; enameled bath tub, hot and 
cold water, so arranged that either cistern with force pump, city water, or both, can be used. 
Soapstone stationary wash tubs; enameled kitchen sink; slop sink, with hot and cold water 
in tank room on second floor; cesspool 47 feet deep, bricked and vented. Brick-set range, 
Richardson & Boynton; also their hot water heating plant in cellar; radiators in every room 
and in halls. 

Storm windows and Burrows screens complete. Electric door and call bells; house 
fully wired for electric lights. Cellar 39 x 49 feet; cement vegetable cellar; garret over all 
of house. Corner lots 75 feet on High and Oak streets, and 300 on Woodbury. Fine view 
of Lake Pepin, two short blocks distant. Nine large shade trees surrounding lots. 80 feet 
of veranda. Fine barn facing side street, supplied with city water; two box and one single 
stalls; large shed; chicken house and pens. Large lot back of barn. 

In order to make a quick sale and an object to purchaser, owner will throw in car- 
pets — English body brussels and Wilton velvet on first floor, Hartford brussels on second;, 
shades, best Scotch holland; lace curtains; draperies; oak dining suit to match finish of 
room; mahogany; gold-leaf and upholstered furniture; Japanese screens; four oak bed- 
room suits; dishes; lamps and all kitchen furnishings and utensils. 

For further particulars, address 

E. D. CORWIN, 

Lake City, Minn, 



RECREATION. 



XIX 



SPORTSMEN'S 

Camping & Fishing 

TENTS. 

YACHT AND CANOE SAILS. 



FLAGS AND BURGEES. 

Canvas Covers and Camp Furniture 
of Every Description. 



-<5k.- 



S. HEMMENWAY & SON 



60 South St., New York City. 

Send 5-cent stamp for our Tent and Flag Catalogue. 



Scovill's 



rib 



NEW WATERBURY 



»J* 



Camera. 



Containing (new) safety shut- 
ter, view finder, (new) focus- 
ing adjustment, three double 
plate holders. Leather cov- 
ered. All for $15. 4x5 Size. 
Send for complete descrip- 
tive circular to 

SCOVILL & ADAMS CO., 

423 Broome St., New York. 

For Prices on the best and Most 
Comfortable 

Sleeping Bag 

ever made, write or call on 
S. HEMENWAY & SON, 

60 South St., New York City. 



New Haven, Conn., Aug. 14, 1895 

Editor Recreation : 

If you continue to act in the 
future as you have in the past, 
you ought to have the world 
at your feet before long ; and 
certainly the people who are 
advertising in your magazine 
cannot but feel thoroughly 
satisfied with the results ob- 
tained and with the main 
courtesies you extend to tlnm. 
Yours respectfully. 

The Marlin Fire Arms Co. 

By C \ R Small. 




TUB Empress 
Toil 




Preparations. 



Savon Imperial, the Amy Facial Soap. 50 eta. 

Can be used on the most delicate skin. 

The Empress Hand-Whitener. $1.00. 

A superior cream preparation for softening 

and whitening the skin. 

The Empress Skin-Tonic. $1.00. 

Stimulates, cleanses and disinfects the skin. 
The best antiseptic. Excellent for bath. 

The Empress Skin Purifier. $1.50. 

A powerful agent for cleansing the entire 
system. All impurities are forced out through 
the pores, the skin becomes clear and free 
from blackheads, moth patches, etc. 

The Empress Bust Food. $2.00. 

Has no rival. Speedily forms new tissues and 
makes a beautiful bust and neck. 

The Empress Face Powder. 75 l 

A delicate and perfectly smooth 1 

der, warranted free from injurious chemicals. 

Mailed on receipt of price , and on sale at 

MRS. E. AMY'S OFFICE, 

36 E. 23d St., New York. 



" Recreation ia the best magau 

published. FRANK 1 . I "" 

I have known "Coquin. 
regard him as an old friend. , 

K. SiMM R, MH . i ». > 



X 



X 



RECREATION. 



HIS FIRST CIGAR 




-hf\. 










I. AH THERE ! 



2. THANKS AWFULLY. 



"3* 




RECREATION. 



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IF YOU WANT ALL THE BEST PEOPLE TO 
READ IT PUT IT IN "RECREATION. 



XX11 



RECREATION. 



FOREHAND ARMS CO.'S 
LATEST MODEL 

Ejector and Non-Ejector Hammerless Double Gun. 




We challenge competition in Beauty, Workmanship, Simplicity of Mechanism, Shooting 
Qualities and Price. We target all of our guns with nitro powder. 

ForXataiogue, address FOREHAND ARMS CO., Worcester, Mass. 



The Wabash Railroad 

Forms an important link with all lines from the EAST 
to all points WEST, NORTHWEST and SOUTH- 
WEST. 

The ONLY Through Sleeping Car Line from 

New York and Boston to St. Louis via 

NIAGARA FALLS. 

Leave New York (Grand Central Sta.) daily, 6 p. m. 

Leave Boston (Fitchburg R. R. Sta.) daily, 3 p. m. 

All meals served in Dining Cars. 

Through Sleeping Cars from New York and Boston 
to Chicago leave New York, West Shore R. R., daily 
6 p. m. and 8 p. m.; leave Boston, Fitchburg R. R. 
Station, daily 3 p. m. and 7 p. m. 

It is the most direct line between the following 
points : Toledo or Detroit and St. Louis and Kansas 
City ; Detroit and Chicago ; Chicago and St. Louis ; 
St. Louis and Kansas City and Omaha. 

Solid Vestibuled Trains, unsurpassed Dining Cars, 
Reclining Chair Cars (seats free) on all through 
trains. 

All transfers in St. Louis for Kansas City, Omaha, 
St. Joseph, Denver, Colorado Springs, Texas, Mexico 
and California points made in the NEW UNION 
DEPOT at that point. 

For further information in regard to rates, etc., 
apply to 

H. B. McCLELLAN, 
Gen'l Eastern Agent, 

387 Broadway, New York. 
CHAS. M. HAYS, C. S. CRANE, 

Vice-Pres. & Gen'l Mgr. Gen'l Pass. & Ticket Agt. 
St. Louis, Mo 



The "ONEITA" Union Suit 

FOR LADIES, MISSES AND nEN. 

In Staple Colors and all Qualities. 

1. More easily and 
quickly put on and off 
than any other make. 

2. Entirely Elastic 
in every way and per- 
fectly self-adjustable. 






3. No buttons under corset which hurt and injure. 

4. No inelastic stay down the front, eventually 
causing uncomfortable tightness. 

5. Allows corset one size smaller. 

6. A PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED. 
Ladies' size 3 will fit figures under 115 lbs. in weight. 
Size 4, from 115 to 130 lbs. Size 5, from 130 to 150 lbs. 
Size 6, from 150 to 160 lbs. Extra Sizes 7 and 8 for 
over 160 lbs- 

Misses' Sizes, I, 2, 3, 4, 5,— figures of ages from 3 
to 15 years. ^^ 

Sold by best dealers generally. When not 
obtainable, -write to 

JAMES F. WHITE & CO., 56 Worth St., H. Y. 

T\n& "Oneita" Bicycle Pants 

have extra heavy seat and crotch in one piece and 
without seam at any point of contact with saddle of 
horse or bicycle, Made in summer and winter weights. 

Colors for summer : white, ecru, cream. 
" " winter : white, gray, black. 

For men, ladies and children. Patent applied for. 



RECREATION. 



XXI II 




Having purchased bhe entire stock of Guns of the 

WILKES=BARRE GUN CO., 

we offer them at the following low prices : 

Hammer Gun, Fine Twist Barrels List, $35.00 ; our price, $17.50 

Hammerless Gun, Fine Twist Barrels " 50.00; " 3150 

Hammerless Gun, Damascus Barrels " 60.00 ; " 3500 

All guns latest model, 12 guage, 7 to 8 pounds, bored for nitro powders. 

EVERY GUN FULLY GUARANTEED. 

If in need of a gun it will pay you to buy one of these at once. 

SCHOVERLING, DALY & GALES, 

302 Broadway, New York. 

Spencer Repeating Shot Gun. 

BEST IN THE WORLD. SIX SHOTS IN THREE SECONDS. 

Twist Steel Barrel Case Hardened System. 

'" ~ 1 ' ■^i'ii m i i _ i » n iMi .' 

1 ""-St 




Lincoln, Neb., May :i, 1- 

Dear Sir : — I have used a Spencer Repeating Shot Gun for eight years. I have fired 

many thousands of shots with it, and it is apparently in as good condition to-day as it irafl 

when I purchased it. Several years ago a friend of mine, now residing in this city, stood 

by my side and saw me kill six prairie chickens out of a covey that arose simultaneously, 

shooting each bird separately For any kind of shooting from jack snipe t<> L, r ccsc, I 1 

the Spencer to any gun I have ever used. 

Yours very truly, I. 1 . If< >' I /. 



W holetale 



HERMANN BOKER & CO., 101-103 Duane St., N. Y„ W 2SS 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CIRCULAR. 

Mentl 'ii Ki 1 



XXIV 



RECREATION. 



The 6 M. M. BLAKE. 




A Revolving Packet Multiple Loader. 

A high grade hunting repeating rifle, built to use full charges of smokeless rifle powder. 
6 Mr M. Calibers, .236 U. S. Navy, nuzzle Velocity, 2500 ft. 
7% " " .30 " Army, " " 2000 ft. 

Reduced charges or black powder may be used. Also full mantle, half mantle with soft lead points, or all 
lead bullets. The only repeating sporting rifle that will shoot above standard cartridges. Send for free catalogue. 

JOHN HENRY BLAKE, 136 Liberty Street, New York. 

AN 

Illuminator, 



Not Simply a 
Signal. 



IT BURNS 

KEROSENE. 



IT BURNS 

10 HOURS. 



Bridgeport Brass Co. 

Bridgeport, Conn 
19 Murray Street, 




».t. IS Wll3.t it is named. 



The Sandow Bicycle Lock, 

STRONG, SMALL AND SECURE. 

Attachable to the Chain and Sprocket Wheel. 

SO CENTS. 




THIEF PROOF. 



EASILY ADJUSTED. 



The Sandow is the only bicycle lock which fills a long-felt want 
among bicycle riders, because it is thief proof and can be carried 
in the tool bag or vest pocket, with key attachable to key chain. 

A mystery to unlock until shown how. Cannot be picked ©pen 
or cut. 

SOLD BY ALL BICYCLE DEALERS, 

or sent to any address on receipt of 50 cents. Send for complete 
catalogue of Cyclometers, Star Lamp Brackets, etc. 



The Bridgeport Gun Implement Co., 

313 & 315 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



RECREATION. 



XXV 



FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF. 




Mosler Patent Improved 
Office Safe. 



OUR HOUSE SAFES . . . 

Finished handsomely in cab- 
inet design. Are sold at mode- 
rate prices. They may be ordered 
in imitation of any wood to har- 
monize with furniture and 
fixtures. 



OUR BUSINESS SAFES. 




Fire and burglar-proof, 
every requirement. 



meet 



Mosler Patent Improved 
House Safe. 



OSLER SAFE CO. 



305 Buoadumy, Cornet* Daane Street, 



Telephone, 1086 Franklin. 



NEW YORK. 



The New England 
Kitchen Magazine. 

This handsome Domestic Science 
Monthly covers every department 
of the home life, brings the methods 
of the technical schools into the 
household, is progressive and 
authoritative. 



PUBLISHED AND EDITED BY 

MRS. MARY F. LINCOLN, 
MRS. ESTELLE M. H. MERRILL, 
and MISS ANNA BARROWS. 



MARSTERS HAS WORMS ! 

SAND WORMS, 12c. a doz. 

WHITE OR BLOOD WORMS, 25c. a doz. 



Agents Wanted in Every Town. 

Liberal Commissions. 
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Price $1 .00 a Year. 



51,53 and 55 Court St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 



Send for 
Particulars to 




Shooting Pictures. 



By A. B. FROST. 



The most important series of the kind 

ever published. • 



NOW READY IN COLOR REPRODUCTIONS. 

Charles Scribner's Sons, 

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RECREATION. 



X X VI I 




Best Bicycle in the World. 

LIGHT, GRACEFUL, STRONG, SPEEDY, BEAUTIFULLY FINISHED, 

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Four Models, $85 and $ 1 00. 

Elegant 40-page Catalogue Free at any Agency or mailed for 

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EASTERN WAREHOUSE, 9 7 CHAMBERS ST., NEW YORK 
BRANCHES: Boston, San Francisco, Portland, Salt Lake City, Denver, Memphis, Detroit. 



XXV111 



RECREATION. 



THE OTHER SIDE. 



St.John's, Ariz. 



Editor Recreation: 



For months past I have been reading a 
quantity of " rot " about " protection to the 
game," and indiscriminate " slaughter " by- 
Indians, until I am surfeited. In the first 
place, I am certain a majority of those who 
are so ready to shed " crocodile tears " over 
the game which they have no chance to kill, 
and who write with such flippancy anentthe 
Indian, know precious little about him. No 
doubt these same unselfish (?) protectors of 
our game have the audacity to accuse the 
Indian of exterminating the buffalo; also of 
killing all the game which at one time cov- 
ered every State in the Union. 

Major Schieffelin, in the August number 
of Recreation, has this to say in reference 
to the buffalo, and what he saw of them in 
1861: 

" Buffalo were abundant all along the up- 
per river. At times the plains were covered 
with them as far as the eye could reach. 
One morning when we awakened we saw 
what seemed to be millions of buffalo." 

Notwithstanding the great numbers known 
to exist at that time, and as incredible as it 
may seem, these immense herds of buffalo 
were entirely annihilated during the year 

1862. Was this wholesale slaughter com- 
mitted by Indians ? No, sir; the white man 
did it. I first crossed the plains, over the 
old Santa Fe trail, early in the spring of 

1863, and in many places saw acres of ground 
literally covered with dead buffalo; and the 
scoundrels who slaughtered them never even 
took off the hides. Would any true sports- 
man consider it honorable to ride up to a 
herd of cattle and deliberately shoot them 
down so long as his ammunition held out ? 
In this manner the buffalo were extermin- 
ated. 

To make another quotation: " It was here 
at Trapper's Cabin," says L. L. Dyche, in 
April Recreation, " that the boys, as they 
called themselves collectively, killed be- 
tween 90 and 100 deer within a quarter of a 
mile of the cabin's door." Is such dastardly 
work as this a matter for glorification ? It 
would be equally sportsmanlike (?) and 
about as honorable for one to take a Win- 
chester and pump lead into a flock of sheep. 

Again referring to Recreation: Look at 
the picture in the August number represent- 
ing ducks and other fowl wantonly slaugh- 
tered; and these gentlemanly sportsmen (?) 
must use decoys to make their wholesale 
destruction of game that much greater. In 
this connection I will state, and without fear 
of honest contradiction, that no true hunter 
ever uses decoys for shooting fowl or fire for 
hunting deer and its kindred species. For 
more than 40 years I have lived on the fron- 
tier, and in that time have killed of every 
kind of game on the continent, yet I never 
used, nor saw others use, decoys or fire but — 



then there may be a great difference be- 
tween hunter and sportsman. While Arizona 
was infested with Apache Indians all sorts 
of game was abundant, but with a few short 
years of white occupancy, the game has al- 
most disappeared. 

It is from the white man's wholesale 
slaughter that our game needs protection, 
and not from its hereditary friend — the In- 
dian. Two white men armed with Winches- 
ters or breech-loading shotguns, will destroy, 
in one season, more food game than a whole 
tribe of Indians. 

Now, Mr. Editor, the worst " pot-hunting" 
fiend I ever knew never did blow his bazoo 
half so much about his killings as do some 
of these gentlemanly sportsmen (?) who 
have emptied their repeating rifles into a 
herd of dull, sleepy buffalo. These are facts 
which cannot be truthfully controverted. 

A. F. Banta. 



From first page to last Recreation is full of 
bright, clean, interesting reading, and you deserve 
the thanks of sportsmen for publishing such a de- 
lightful magazine. Calvin Lee, Reading, Pa. 



The first copy of Recreation that came to my 
hands I picked up in a book-stall. It was just what 
I wanted. 1 showed it to two friends, and they are 
both subscribers now. 

E. L. Kellogg, Seattle, Wash. 

A friend has sent me a copy of Recreation, and 
I think it the best paper of the kind I ever saw. En- 
closed please find postal money-order for $6.00, for 
which kindly send the magazine to the six addresses 
given below. I. Talbert, West Elkton, O. 



Any man who wants more than Recreation, one 
whole year for one little dollar, must want the earth. 
Herewith find a dollar, for which please send the 
magazine to my friend, as below. Shall send you 
many other subscriptions in the near future. 

M. H. Wright, Uhrichsville, O. 



I think Recreation the best magazine of its kind 
ever published. Every sportsman ought to be proud 
to subscribe for it. 

F. C. Canfield, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 



Such a magazine as Recreation tends to ennoble 
the reader, while fiction fails to furnish true recrea- 
tion to the sportsman. 

E. J. Huxley, Carnduff, N. W. T. 



Recreation is the best magazine I have ever seen 
devoted to Nature's healthful sports. W. W. Hilt. 



Every line in Recreation is interesting. I only 
wish it were published semi-monthly, even at three 
times the present price. 

John E. Bond, Denver, Colo. 

I have copies of each of your books, and, being an 
ardent sportsman, I appreciate them thoroughly. 
Edgar B. Shanks, Capt. Company D, 2d Inf., M. N. 

G., Fairmont, Minn. 



I would not take a dollar apiece for the copies I 
have of Recreation. I recommend it to my friends 
at every opportunity. 

O. G. Myhre, Eddy, New Mexico. 

Recreation is the best magazine of its kind ever 
published. H. A. Sullivan, Austin, 111. 

Recreation leads all the magazines. 

J. B. Lewis, Salt Lake City, Utah. 






RECREATION. 



XXIX 



9eter footer '4 
9lon0egian <€b(t%ii)erCiY 




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process, which is the result or years of scientific in- 
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because it is the Most Agreeable, the Most Digestible, 
the Easiest to Assimilate, and the Only Oil Which can 
be Continuously Administered without causing gas- 
tric disturbances. Put up in flat, oval bottles, sealed 
and dated. For sale by all rightly-stocked druggists. 

W. H. Schieffelin & Co., N. Y., Sole Agents. 



Miss Seaside (haughtily) — I beg your pardon, sir ; 
you have the advantage of me. 

Mr. Lawn Tennis (jauntily) — I should say I had. 
I am the fellow you jilted at Long Branch last sum- 
mer. One yard,J<you say ? 



" I see Hicks is getting his name up," said Digby to 
Gagby, pointing to some men hanging a sign outside 
the sixteenth story window of one of New York's sky 
scrapers. 

""A woman offered her landlady a worthless check in 

Eayment for a week's board. She tried to check 'er 
oard, so to speak. 

She (sadly)— He died on the field. 
He— A soldier ? 
She — No, an umpire. 



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I have just received from a friend n 
Recreation, fudging from it- appearai 
been passed around among the l><>>s. It 
that neither number, volume, nor pru i 
the publisher's address alone remainn 
me know the subscription pri< lutifui 

magazine ought certain!) to be in 

WM. Cl \1<K. Ml- 

Although 1 am but 18 years old I am an • 
tic sportsman. I take tl 

would rather mi 33 both of the others than to 
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magazine now published. 

B HUB M PA( ki R, Mulherr). 



xxx RECREATION. 

SMOKELESS POWDER CARTRIDGES. 

NOW PERFECTED IN THE FOLLOWING CALIBRES. 

Manufactured by The Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Bridegport, Conn., U. S. A. 




OTHER CALIBRES ARE IN PREPARATION. 



The Union Metallic Cartridge Company, .-. Bridgeport, Conn. 

NEW YORK OFFICE SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE 

313 and 315 Broadway. 517 and 519 Market St. 



RECREATION. 



Aeearate Shooting 

CAN ONLY BE DONE WITH A PERFECT GUN. 




The Remington Hammerless 

Is the finest £nn made in America, and is not excelled by any 
imported arm. 




. . . . All Grades Have . . . . 



Damascus Barrels, 
English Walnut Stock, 
Case-Hardened Frame and 

Mounting's, 
Automatic Safety, 



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Extension Rib with Bit.-, 

Flat Matted Rib. 



AUTOMATIC EJECTING. 
NON- AUTOMATIC EJECTING. 



F»rice $45.00 and Upward, 



The Remington Arms Co. 

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New York Office, 315 Broadway, New York Citv. 

Handsomely Illustrated Catalogue for 1895 sent to any address free of charge. 





RECREATION. 

CTJ INCHESTER 

.... model 1894 
30-CAL SMOKELESS CARTRIDGE. 

LIST PRICE, 

$38 PER M 

Using a New Smokeless Powder— Metal Patched Bullet. 

VELOCITY, i3i2 ft. per second. ^d^^ C?S • 

PENETRATION, 33* pine boards \ in. thick. ^^(^P^ \C^Y 

hue t i \< < ri: t< 1 QXyy^ - 

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"26in. ROUND BARREL, LIST $23.00 

We are now prepared to furnish MODEL 1894 Rifles taking the new .30- 

r caliber Winchester Smokeless Cartridge. For the present they will be made 

only with 26 in. round (nickel steel) barrel, list price $23. Take-Down Rifles, §28. 

Winchester Repeating Arms Co. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Send for 1 12-page Catalogue. 

SIMPSON & LYALL PRESS, 136 & 138 WEST 24TH STREET, NEW YORK. 




k .UME III. 
> V1BER 5. 



November, 1895 



$1 A YEAR. 
10c. A COPY. 




A PEEP FROM MY BAY WINDOW. 

AMATIUR PHOTO • * HOMIR AN0.R30* - 




^ij^^^EL^Q^^W. 241^5... 



RECREATION. 



p 

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arker guns can always be found, 
articularly where sportsmen abound. 

11 lovers of guns their merits admit, 
nd if held right they're sure to hit. 

ibs are made by our special machine, 
eason their lines is so readily seen. 

ings patents are used, doing away with all bothers, 
eeping up to date, and ahead of all others. 

very gun tested and guaranteed right, 
ach part well adjusted and perfectly tight. 

ebounding locks and safety device, 
emarkably strong, and of medium price. 



Q 



uns of all sizes and weights are supplied ; 
uns that win prizes wherever they're tried. 



Uniform care throughout their construction ; 
ncle Sam's product, — an American production. 



N 



o superior made ; no matter what price, 
ever "miss fire "—don't have to pull twice. 



Write for Catalogue. 



New York Salesroom, 

96 Chambers Street. 



PARKER BROTHERS, 



MERIDEN, 
CONN. 



SCOTT'S MONTE CARLO 

LATEST AUTOMATIC EJECTOR HAMMERLESS. 



Also Westley Richards, 
Greener, Purdey, 
Lang, Colt, 
Parker, &c. 



We have these with 

ordinary style 

stock, or with 

special stock. 




OTHER GUNS TAKEN IN TRADE. 

Send for Catalogue and IJ»t of 
Second-Hand Guns. Al»o of fln« 
Fishing Tackle. 



The fact that the Scott gun has again taken the Grand Prize at 
Monte Carlo, this time for 800 pounds sterling, with Object of Art, shot 
for by ninety-three competitors, speaks volumes in its praise 



AGENTS: WM. READ & SONS, 107 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



RECREATION. 

Copyright, May, 1895, by G. O. Shields. 
A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything that the Name Implies. 



$1.00 A Year, 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



19 West 24 ihSi rei i . 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER. 

"At the Crack of the Nitro Something Broke." FRON1 IS! 

Pheasant Shooting. Illustrated Thomas G. Farrell. 

The Other Kind. (Poem) Brad. L. Hubert. 

Sitting Bull's Last Medicine. Illustrated Margaret Gray Brooks. 

When the Leaves Come Sailing Down. (Poem.) Illustrated. Col. W. T. Dennis. 

A Winter Trip to Jamaica. Illustrated S. B. HOPKINS. 

Crossing the Plains 30 Years Ago. Illustrated Gen. John Gibbon. U.S.A. 

A Mountain Lion Hunt by Night. Illustrated Robert Meade Smith, M.I). 

T routing on Clark's Fork. Illustrated Gen. F. W. Benteen, U.S.A. 

Ducking off Machipongo. Illustrated W. J. BoGERT. 

Gautemotzin, the Last of the Aztecs Dr. E. J. TUCK] R 

From the Game Fields 241 | Fish and Fishing 

Editor's Corner 247 | Amateur Photography 

Bicycling 249 | Publisher's Department 

Entered as Second Class Matter at New York Post Office, Oct. 17th, 1894. 



Pagi 

II < I 

214 

222 
231 

234 

\ 111 



OUR 1894 MODEL. 

The New Ideal Rifle. 





Send for Catalogue. 



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fire cartridges, as ordered. Can be dis- 
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frame and drop lever action similar to that of the 
Ballard rifle. 

AH styles of Stevens' Rifles and 
Pistols in stock. 




5 shots, 25 yards off- 
hand, with No. 2 .Rifle. 
22-cal. 



J. Stevens' Arms and Tool Co. 

p. 0. box m, 

CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS. 
U. S A. 




5 Bhota, 10 yards off- 
baud, with No. 1 Rifle. 
32-cal. 



PRINTED BY SIMPSON & LYALL PRESS, 136 t 138 WEST 24TM STREET. NEW YORK 



11 



RECREATION. 



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BY THE 



Atlas Line of Mail Steamers. 

Specially built for tropical passenger servicr. 



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Pier 55, 

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Weekly. 




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JAMAICA 



GIVING WINTER RESORT IN THE WORLD. 



SPECIAL TOURS to the WEST INDIES and SPANISH MAIN, costing about $5 A DAY, fully described 

"in our illustrated pamphlet, mailed free. Address 



PIM, FORWOOD & KELLOCK, 



24 STATE ST., NEW YORK. 



Mutual Reserve Fund Life Association. 

E. B. HARPER, PRESIDENT. 

$40,000,000 Saved in Premiums. 

The Mutual Reserve, by reducing the rates to 
harmonize with the payments to widows and or- 
phans, has already saved its policy-holders more 
than Forty Million Dollars in premiums. 

1881. THE ELOQUENCE OF RESULTS. 1895. 

No. of Policies in force, over 98,000 

Interest Income, annually exceeds $135,000 

Bi-Monthly Income exceeds $750,000 

Reserve Emergency Fund exceeds $3,860,000 

Death Claims paid, over $21,000,000 

New Business received in 1894 exceeded $81,000,000 

Total Insurance in force $300,000,000 




g% g^ The total cost for the past fourteen years, for g% ^^ 

w\\W $10,000 insurance in the Mutual Reserve f^ll 

\J^J amounts to less than Old System Companies ^J\J 

n n OM » charge for $4,500 at ordinary life rates— a ». n ol1 * 

rBl UCnl. saving, in premiums, which is equal to a cash rCI UCfll, 



.dividend of nearly 60 per cent. 



40 



MUTUAL RESERVE BUILDING. 



MILLION DOLLARS 
SAVED IN PREMIUMS 



40 



The Mutual Reserve, by reducing 
the rates to harmonize with the payments to 
widows and orphans, has already saved its 
policy-holders more than Forty Million Dollars 
in Premiums. 



EXCELLENT POSITIONS OPEN in its Agencj 
Department in every Town, City and State to experienced 
and successful business men, who will find the Mutual Re- 
serve the very host Association they can 
work for. 

home office: 

MUTUAL RESERVE BUILDING, 

Cor. Broadway & Duane St., New York. 



RECREATIOX. Vn 



DOGS BOARDED, 





WITHIN EASY DISTANCE OF NEW YORK 



Have been thoroughly reorganized (and in the near future 

will be much enlarged). 



Resident Manager, W. H. MACKAY. 
Consulting Veterinarian, T. G. SHERWOOD, M. R. C. V. S. 
These Kennels are now under the direct supervision of our Show Superintendent, Mr. E. M 
OLDHAM, President American Spaniel Club, etc., etc. 



DOGS BOARDED, NURSED, PREPARED FOR SHOWS, ETC. 



Send for particulars and free pamphlets on Dog Diseases, to 

SPRATTS PATENT, LTD., 

245 EAST 56th STREET NEW YORK CITY. 

E. I. DUPONT de NEMOURS & CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Smokeless Powder. 

The Safest, Strongest, Quickest and Cleanest Nitro Powder in the world. 
Less Smoke than any other Nitro. Will not Pit or Rust the barrels. 

High Velocity with Moderate Pressure. Close and Even Pattern, with 
Great Penetration. The Nitro for which Sportsmen have been waiting. 



SEND TO US FOR PRICE-LIST WITH DIRECTIONS FOR LOADING. 

OR TO 
E. S. RICE, ... 62 Wabash Avenue, { CLINTON BIDWELL, - 14 West Swan St. 

Chicago. Buffalo, N. Y. 

WM, McBLAIR, - 509 North Third Street, SHOEMAKER & VOUTE, 126 South Del. Ave 

St. Louis, Mo. Philadelphia, Pa. 

R. S. WADDELL, - 45 West Second Street, \ H. P. COLLINS, - 22 South Calvert Street 

Cincinnati, Ohio. Baltimore, Md. 

FRED. J. WADDELL, Cor. 8th & Chestnut Sts., | ARTHUR HYNDMAN, - 
Chattanooga, Tenn. New York 



L. C. THORNHILL, - 54 Gravicr Street, 

New Orleans, La. 

D. W. C. BIDWELL & CO., - 143 Water St., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



GEO. E. SMITH & CO., - 7 Central Wharf, 

Boston, Mass. 
S. C. MADDEN, - 1310 Eighteenth Street 

Denver, Col. 



C. A. HAIGHT, 226 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



IV 



RECREATION. 




RESIDENCE OF E. D. CORWIN, LAKE CITY, MINN. 



FOR SALE 



A new house containing 10 rooms, 6 on first floor and 4 on second; closet in every 
room with window in each; central hall with Queen Anne stairway. All finished in natural 
hard woods; sycamore in parlor; red gum wood or hazel in library; dining and bathrooms 
in oak ; bedroom on first floor in birch; kitchen and pantry in hard pine, furnished with 
plenty of drawers and shelves ; halls and second floor in ash. Bronze hardware and trim- 
mings throughout. Bathroom has open sanitary plumbing ; enameled bath tub. hot and 
cold water, so arranged that either cistern with force pump, city water, or both, can be used. 
Soapstone stationary wash tubs; enameled kitchen sink; slop sink, with hot and cold water 
in tank room on second floor; cesspool 47 feet deep, bricked and vented. Brick-set range, 
Richardson & Boynton; also their hot-water heating plant in cellar; radiators in every room 
and in halls. 

Storm windows and Burrows screens complete. Electric door and call bells; house 
fully wired for electric lights. Cellar 39 x 49 feet; cement vegetable cellar; garret over all 
of house. Corner lots 75 feet on High and Oak streets, and 300 on Woodbury. Fine view 
of Lake Pepin, two short blocks distant. Nine large shade trees surrounding lots. 80 feet 
of veranda. Fine barn facing side street, supplied with city water; two box and one single 
stalls; large shed; chicken house and pens. Large lot back of barn. 

In order to make a quick sale and an object to purchaser, owner will throw in car- 
pets -English body brussels and Wilton velvet on first floor, Hartford brussels on second; 
shades, best Scotch holland; lace curtains; draperies; oak dining suit to match finish of 
room; mahogany; gold-leaf and upholstered furniture; Japanese screens; four oak bed- 
room suits; dishes; lamps and all kitchen furnishings and utensils. 

For further particulars, address 

E. D. CORWIN, 

Lake City, Minn. 



RECREATION. 



Model 1893. MARLIN. 




Rifle with 26-inch octagon, 
Yz octagon or round barrel. 
$3.00, list. 

Barrel, Receiver and Action made of steel warranted and guaranteed 
to the U. S. Government test as applied to materials for Krag 
Jorgensen rifle. 



jm^^^, 




38-55. Smokeless cartridges 
with metal patched or mush- 
room bullets. 



All Lengths and Styles, Regular and TAKE-DOWN. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

THE MARLIN FIRE ARHS CO., 

IVJe\A/ b-isiv&in, Conn. 

Send 15 cents and we will mail a park of highest quality playing-cards, special design. 



For Shooting and Fishing . . . 




T 



RY the territory traversed by the lines of the 

Chicago, flilwaukee and 
St. Paul Railway. 

Some of the best deer shooting in the count; 
to be had in Northern Wisconsin and the Peninsula 
of Michigan. 

Prairie chickens, ducks, geese, partridge, etc., 
are plentiful along its lines in Iowa. Minnefl 
South Dakota and North Dakota. 

For fishing — trout, bass, muscollon. - .,— 

there are numberless streams and lakes in Wisconsin, 
Michigan and the Peninsula of Michigan. 

Send to GEO. H. HEAFFORD, General 
Passenger Agent, Chicago, 111., for free cop 
Game Laws of the States through which our lines run and for detailed infor- 
mation as to fishing and shooting resorts. 



VI 



RECREATION. 




Athletic Goods 

Represent the standard of excellence. 

H'onestly made of the finest materials. 



Zhe Dictor Xeaoue Ball 

Is a favorite among ball-players. 

Ube IDictor tennis Ball 

Is the best and most durable ball on the market. 



OVERilAN WHEEL CO., 

Makers of Victor Bicycles, 

Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Boston. New York. Detroit. Denver. Pacific Coast : San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland* 







AT THE REPORT OF THE NITRO, SOMETHING BROKE. 



Volume III. 



RECREATION. 

NOVEMBER, 1895. 

G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager. 



Number 5. 



The American News Co., Agents for the U. S. and Canada. The International Newu ( \, < „,„, .1 
Agents for Europe. Offices: Beams Buildings, Chancery Lane, London. I C 1 
land; btephanstrasse 18, Leipzig, Germany. 




PHEASANT SHOOTING. 

Thomas G. Farrell. 



/' IFTEEN years ago, as nearly 
every sportsman is aware, a 
good citizen of Oregon im- 
ported from China a num- 
ber of the beautiful ring- 
necked pheasants of that 
land, and liberated them in 
several counties of this 
State. Wise legislation and thought- 
ful sportsmen protected the birds, and 
now they are plentiful. Throughout 
the Willamette valley and in the 
shadow of those mighty volcanic 
peaks of the Cascades, most excel- 
lent pheasant shooting is to be had. 

One day William came to me and 
said : 

" What do you say to a trip up to 
Broadmeads to-morrow ? That last 
rain must have laid the dust, and a 
dog ought to be able to find some 
birds." 

I replied that nothing would give 
me greater pleasure, and that I would 
not fail him. My old gun was then 
taken from its resting-place, where it 
had been since the last duck-shoot, 
of the previous fall, and shells were 
loaded. For ammunition, I used 
Schultze and E. C. powder mixed, 
loaded in smokeless cases, as I find 
such a load will produce very desira- 
ble results if the weapon is held cor- 
rectly. Having no dog suitable for 
pheasant shooting, I borrowed " Pad- 
dy," an Irish setter, from a friend. 

The weather was almost unbeara- 
bly warm, yet Tuesday afternoon 
found me making a hurried march to 
the station. William was on hand, 
and we soon had the dog and guns 
stowed away in the baggage car. 

Pulling out of Portland proper, we 



were shortly flying through the sub- 
urbs and crawling around the dan- 
gerous-looking bluff's at Palatine Hill 
and Elk Rock. Far below us the 
cold green-looking depths of the 
placid Willamette shimmered in the 
summer sun. 

Rushing past Oswego with its great 
iron-works, and Sucher Lake with its 
yellow rafts of cordwood, we entered 
a stretch of burning woods. Again, 
we were rolling past well-tilled 
farms and onion ranches, thousands 
of acres of hop-yards and vegetable 
gardens, and then the train slowly 
crossed the trestle which spans the 
Tualatin river. 

It was dark when we slowed up at 
Broadmead station, and we set out 
for the house at a brisk pace. Broad- 
meads farm consists of more than 
3,000 acres of fine, tillable land, and 
is one of the best cultivated tracts 
in the State. But little shooting is 
allowed there, and birds are quite 
plentiful. We soon reached the 
farmhouse, where I was surprised at 
the great barns and the number! 
farm employees. It was m the midst 
of the threshing season. The mana- 
ger, Mr. McEldowney, informed 
that his crew of 2\ nun had been 
working i; days and the work was 
yet unfinished. 

Early the next morning we started 
for the holds. Following a lan< 
short distance we crossed a small 01 
chard and descended into the bottom 
lands of the Yamhill river, wl 
wheat and oat fields stretch awa\ 
miles. "Paddy" ranged wild, and 
was inclined to notice the meadow 
larks, but we let him have his way, 



20"? 



204 



RECREATION. 



hoping to wear off the sharp edge of 
his desire. The grass and weeds 
were heavy with dew, and our shoes 
were soon as if they had been dropped 
into the river. Coming to a low 
piece of ground which was over- 
grown with willows, long grass, and 
cockle burrs, Paddy tore his way 
into it. Two pheasants arose, and 
William promptly bagged his bird, 
while the one I fired at went on to 
the grain fields. 

Beating some other cover without 
success, we crossed a fence and en- 
tered an immense wheat field. The 
grain was all cut and shocked, mak- 
ing the scene a typical one of har- 
vest time. In the thick, smoky at- 
mosphere of the East, like a mighty 
disk of copper, rose old Sol. Far 
away, at the other side of the field, the 
foreman was steaming up his thresh- 
ing engine preparatory to the day's 
work, and the blue smoke floated 
low beside the giant oaks. 

Entering the field by "a road at our 
right, came three or four wagon- 
loads of harvest hands, and the voices 
of two or three in song floated to our 
ears. Heavy was the air with the in- 
cense of the harvest field, and with 
the odor of broken ferns. It was 
truly a scene to be remembered, but 
as Paddy was quartering a patch of 
heavy weeds and showing considera- 
ble interest in his work, we turned 
away. We were awakened from our 
sentimental mood by the whirr of a 
pheasant, closely followed by a dozen 
others. We each got in two barrels, 
with a net result of two birds. 

So far our actions had notbeen con- 
ducted with much credit to ourselves, 
and Paddy looked at us with ill-con- 
cealed disdain. With mutual admo- 
nitions to " brace up," we went in 
pursuit of some of the birds which we 
had marked down. Crossing a piece 
of bare stubble, a young cock got up 
in front of me, and I neatly stopped 
him. 

Taking Paddy, who had now set- 
tled down to business, I wandered 
toward a likely looking corner, while 
William beat the stubble field. In 
one corner grows a great oak and 



several ash and cherry trees. The 
grass remained untouched about 
these trees, and I felt sure the cover 
must contain a few birds. Paddy 
worked up to the place rapidly, made 
game, and slowed down to a point. 
Walking up, I flushed two birds, and 
one of them became my victim. At 
the report of my gun several others 
took wing from the other side of the 
cover, but, sending the dog in, I was 
rewarded with a fine point. The bird 
proved to be a royal old cock, and 
on flushing, he soared right up and 
off in a bold break for the open field. 
Away he went, his lorg tail-feathers 
fluttering gayly in the sultry air, and, 
feeling sure of my victim, I covered 
him and watched his gamy flight. 
Feeling that he was approaching the 
extreme range of even such good 
shells as my gun held, I pressed the 
trigger. At the report of the nitro, 
something broke, and the beautiful 
mass of vari-colored feathers came 
tumbling gracefully to earth. 

Rejoining my companion, who 
had found no birds, we beat a large 
field without success, and crossed 
over to where the threshing machine 
was at work. The boys told us that 
birds were frequently found near a 
vegetable garden not far distant, and 
we went in that direction. William 
took the dog, while I went off to find 
my own birds. Walking along beside 
a ditch, I stopped to watch William, 
when a pheasant arose from almost 
under my feet and offered me a fine 
chance. I availed myself of the op- 
portunity, but not of the bird, for 
with a flirt of his long tail he disap- 
peared beyond a grove of scrub oaks. 
William got a bird with the assist- 
ance of the dog, and we then crossed 
the road and visited another part of 
the great farm. We were told that 
birds would surely be found. Al- 
though we cautiously worked over 
the blistering stubble and carefully 
investigated all covers, we saw not a 
feather. With the thermometer at 
90 ° in the shade, such luck was not 
calculated to put us in the best of 
humor, and, getting a drink of cold 
well water, at a farmhouse, we re- 



PHEASANT SHOOTING. 



20 ; 




MONGOLIAN PHEASANT IN FLIGHT. 



turned to the scene of our early 
morning shooting. Working along 
a vine-grown fence, the dog made a 
point, and William flushed two birds, 
of which he got one. We then re- 
turned to the house for something to 
eat. 

After dinner Mr. McEldowney re- 
ported a pheasant in the garden 
patch, and we were soon out among 
the luxuriant corn and pumpkins. 
There were two or three birds in the 
patch, but they were too sharp for 
us, and, flushing wild, sailed away in 
the distance. Garden patches are 
great resorts for the insectivorous 
Mongolian pheasant, and some good 
shooting is sometimes to be had in 
such a place. McEldowney kindly 
volunteered to go out with us, and 
we were soon on our way to the 
fields. Nearing the spot where we 
killed our first bird, Paddy was sent 
into the thick cover, and before we 
quit shooting we had three birds 
down. Another clump of willows 
yielded two birds, one of which es- 



caped my fire only to run again J 
a charge from William's gun. We 
crossed the road again, and this time 
the great wheat stubble prodi 
five or six pheasants. The killing oi 
one of the large cocks was remarka- 
ble. William had crossed a little 
creek and was beating the brush and 
hillside. 1 [earing a peculiai 
ing noise and the discordant call 
several bluejays, 1 made my way in 
the direction of tin- tumult. I found 
that the sounds emanated from tin- 
thick brush a short distance up the 
hillside, and, believing thai Will 
would hear the noise and in\ e« 
I for some minutes stood still 
awaited developments. Finally, 1 
heard William making hi 
through the brush, and in anotl 
minute tin- ja) s d theii 

With a cackle of defian< 
cock pheasant came thresli 
through the tree-tops. I had b 
anticipating some such move, and, 
catching a snap sight of tin- met< 
like form among t lie uppei 



206 RECREATION. 

some alders, I pressed the trigger. I started to investigate. I have an idea 
could not see the result of my shot, that the old bird and several blue- 
but had an intuitive feeling that I had jays were having a battle of words, if 
not missed, and, listening, I heard not of blows, when my snap shot 
the bird crashing through the brush, suddenly terminated the row. 
Calling to William, we both spent Returning again to the productive 
some time before we found the bird, willow swales, we secured a few more 
for the brush was almost impenetra- birds, and then went back to the 
ble. William had taken the strange great farmhouse. The next morning 
noises made by the pheasant for the we flagged the train and returned to 
bleating of a lamb, and, believing the the hot and dusty city, 
jays were worrying a stray, he 



THE OTHER KIND. 
Brad L. Hubert. 

From the altar in a little brown church, 

The pastor spoke, on a bright summer day, 
While the birds sang from the sweet-scented 
birch 

With its wide-spreading limbs o'er the 
way . 
" There is joy in heaven this day," he said, 

" Angels are singing a grand jubilee." 
No birds, no flowers, no green mossy bed? 

That would not be heaven to me. 

As slowly he came down the long church- 
aisle, 

He said, as he languidly grasped my hand, 
And over his face played a feeble smile, 

" There is joy this day in the heavenly 
land ; 
Praises are wafted to the great white throne ; 

Angels are singing by the jasper sea." 
With n© forest retreat, singing alone ? 

That would not be heaven to me. 

I wandered off, o'er the gay green field, 

Where the bright sun chased the shadows 
away ; 
Where all nature seemed vieing to yield 

Endless praise on this calm Sabbath day. 
I wended my way through the shady woods, 

Where birds were singing from each leafy 
tree, 
And thought (all have heterogeneous moods), 

" This is more like heaven to me." 

I sat by the brook with moss-covered banks 

And mused, as it blithely rippled along : 
" It speaks the Maker a burden of thanks, 

In its musical, murmuring song." 
As I stopped to pluck the sweet-scented 
flowers 

That grew in beauty by the way, 
I whispered : " This day, this day, is ours, 

And this would be heaven to me." 



SITTING BULL'S LAST MEDICINE. 



Margaret Gray Brooks. 




SITTING BULL. 

Photo, by Scott. 

ON a wind-swept plain above the 
Missouri river and far across 
the Dakota prairies, Uncle 
Sam placed a Government post, 
nearly 20 years ago, for the protection 
of white settlers and travelers. 

It was named Fort Yates, presum- 
ably in memory of Captain Yates, 
killed in the battle of the Little Big 
Horn in 1876. It lies 58 miles south of 
Mandan, on the Northern Pacific 
Railroad. From here the post can 
be reached in eight to nine hours, by 
army ambulance, with four good 
mules. 

Scarcely a house is seen after 
leaving Fort Lincoln, seven miles 
south of Mandan, until within three 
miles of Fort Yates, where the road 
leads through a small Indian village. 
Occasionally one catches a glimpse 
of the winding Missouri ; otherwise 
the ride is lonely, dreary and monot- 
onous. 

At the post gates is the " Stand- 
ing Rock Agency," which receives its 
name from an upright rock that the 



Indians say is a petrified squaw. This 
agency is the supply station oi the 
Government for the Sioux occupy- 
ing the northern strip of tli 
reservation. 

During the winter of '90 and 
the post was garrisoned by two 
troops of the 8th Cavalry and' three 
companies of the 12th Infantry, com- 
manded by Lieutenant-Colonel Drum. 
of the latter regiment ; in all. about 
275 men, women, and children. At 
the agency the whites numbered only 
18 or 20, while the Sioux, in this 
northern half, aggregated 5,000. 

The Indians had been pea< eable 
during the several preceding years. 
Their agent was an honest, upright 
man, fair in all his dealings with them. 
They respected and liked him, as 
well as his wife, who acted as inter- 
preter and personally aided many 
in sickness and sorrow, often going 
10 miles or more across the wild, 
snowy land, at night in midwintei 
aid the sick and suffering. 

The Indians had newer seemed 
more content. They were well 
and well clothed ; their children 
were receiving good educations at 
the agency school, under tin- dil 
tion of 14 Catholic Sisters, as well 
as at the half-dozen or more- mi!> 
agency schools in different parts 
the reservation; while others wen- in 
the East, at Carlisle or Hampton 
Road. 

Suddenly, in the early fad oi 
a strange rumor spread through the 
Sioux nation, telling of tin- coming 
of the Messiah. Little more- th 
a whisper at first, it gradually gained 
credence and assumed vast pi 
tions, resulting in overwhelm ii 
moralization of the Indians. 
months later it required the- in 
of the greater part of ournorthw 
ern army to bring the- red men from 
the warpath. 

The story had conn- from ti: 
tant Northwest, where- the- Messiah 



207 



208 



RECREATION. 




SITTING BULLS CABIN; SCENE OF THE FIGHT. 
Photo, by Scott, Lander, Wyo. 



was supposed to be, whence it had 
travelled by the aid of runners and 
visiting Indians. As it reached the 
Sioux, it brought up wonderful vis- 
ions for future years and memories 
of old-time wars. The Messiah was 
on earth, ready to aid his followers. 
Now he was herding buffalo, mak- 
ing spring-wagons and money — so 
the queer tale ran — and all for those 
who obeyed his wishes and followed 
.his teachings. The white people, in 
the spring, would be covered by a 
"sea of mud," and once more the 
red men would rule. 

Who should be one of the first to 
pretend to accept the belief, but the 
crafty, cunning old medicine-man, 
Sitting Bull, he who had been so 
great among the Sioux not many 
years before ? Now, in his old age, 
he found himself almost alone, his 
band having, one by one, joined 
those of other and more progressive 



chiefs. No longer a prophet, no 
longer an authority, bereft of all the 
prestige of his younger life, his wily 
nature exposed by honest Indians, 
he was eager to grasp anything that 
might restore him to his old power 
In the Messiah craze he saw his op- 
portunity. He heard the tale, pro- 
fessed to believe it, then retold it, 
exaggerated and dwelt upon it with 
all his savage eloquence. 

Could he but once again make 
himself a prophet, he knew some 
of his band would return to him. He 
first told the Indians it would be an 
open winter. Fortunately for him, 
the snows were late in coming, and 
the winds were mild far into the 
winter season. Then he quickened 
the blood in the veins of his people 
as he related, again and again, with 
cunning rhetoric, the pleasures of 
the hunt for the beloved buffalo ; 
how they, the red men, could go to 



SITTING BULL'S LAST MEDh INh 



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JOHN GRASS, CHIEF JUSTICE AND LEADING 
STATESMAN OF THE SIOUX. 

war when they chose if the buffalo 
returned, as the Messiah had prom- 
ised. 

Sitting Bull then held up before 
their mind's eye the spring-wagon, 
knowing that, next in desire in the 
Sioux Indian's heart, is this same 
modern vehicle, many of which are 
given to deserving ones by the Gov- 
ernment. Finally, he pictured the 
money, heaps and heaps of it, money 
without limit, in process of manu- 
facture by the Messiah, and all for 
them, if they followed his teachings. 

Now comes the point from which 
the old chief expected gain for him- 
self. He told the Sioux they must 
be prepared to go to the Messiah in 
the spring ; they must go peaceably 
if possible ; if not, then forcibly. 
He knew that if an attempt should 
be made by the Messiah adherents 
to quit the Sioux lands for the north, 
an Indian war would result, and in 
such a war lay his only hope of 
restoration to power; for he was a 
warrior as well as a medicine-man. 

The old chief had received word 
from various tribes of the West re- 
garding the prospective uprising of 
their people with the return of spring. 
He seemed to have no fear of pun- 



ishment for inciting the Sioux to dis- 
obedience of the laws, for he ha< 
ways escaped before and hoped to be 
equally fortunate now. 

He lived about 45 miles from I 
Yates, and his cabin was headquar- 
ters of the ghost dancersof his ti 
Men and women, old and voi 
even little children, joined in tin- 
dance, which they performed 1>\ 
holding hands and dancing around 
in a circle, in the centre <>i which 
they had placed one of the "ghost 
shirts" on a high pole. This was a 
white cotton garment, rudely painted 
and fringed, and it was supposed 
to render invulnerable any person 
who was so fortunate as to wear it. 

The Sioux nation had become 
sadly demoralized. The army women 
and children no longer were allowed 
to walk outside the garrison. The 
agent at Standing Roek ordered tin- 
leaders to have the ghost dance 
stopped, but they refused to obey. 
Many of Sitting Bull's old follow- 
ers had returned to him, led on anc* 
on by his alluring promises regarding 
the Messiah;by the fever of war, and 
by the prospect of the wiping out 
the hated white people. 




EAGLE-MAN, PROMINENT IN IHL LAI. 
GRAND RIV1 



210 



RECREATION. 



A feeling of terrible uncertainty 
had spread over the western portion 
of the Dakotas, north and south, 
and the settlers in isolated farm- 
houses were terror-stricken. 

A detachment of cavalry, sent out 
from the post across the river, brought 
back startling reports. The Messiah 
story was known all over the land, 
and the Sioux grew bolderand bolder, 
intimidating and threatening the 
whites. They told the farmers, among 
other things, that their houses and 
fields all would belong to the In- 
dians in the spring, when they, the 
whites, were killed. The cavalry had 
met many families of whites on the 
roads, fleeing from their little homes 
and carrying their goods with them. 

By the second week of December, 
Sitting Bull's band had reached the 
limit of Government endurance, in 
disobedience of orders and in defi- 
ance of all laws. A number of Sioux 
who were in Government service, as 
policemen on the reservation, were 
ordered to carefully watch Bull's 
movements. Suddenly, one morning, 
they discovered that he was prepar- 
ing for flight to the south, to join the 
Indians of the lower Dakota agencies, 
who were also making ready for war. 
He realized that his work of exciting 
the Sioux to the breaking of laws 
would no longer be tolerated, and he 
had decided to quit his village before 
being arrested. Couriers carried this 
news to the fort and to the agency. 
For a week past the post-commander, 
a wise and careful soldier and officer, 
had had orders to secure the person 
of Sitting Bull. The plan had been 
to quietly arrest him in his village 
the next ration day, while many of 
his band would be at the agency 
drawing supplies; but when the news 
reached the post that he intended 
flight, it was decided to take him at 
once. Lieutenant-Colonel Drum, 
commander of the post, and Indian 
Agent James McLaughlin, planned 
to have Sitting Bull arrested by the 
Indian police, hoping this course 
would cause less alarm among his 
followers than sending the cavalry to 
make the arrest; though later devel- 



opments showed that perhaps it 
would have been better to have sent 
the troops, as the hostiles doubtless 
would have allowed Sitting Bull to 
be taken peaceably by them rather 
than precipitate a fight. 

A body of Indian policemen was 
dispatched from the agency at night- 
fall to join those patrolling the old 
chief's land at Grand River, with 
orders for his arrest. The cavalry 
was ordered to march at midnight, 
meet the policemen when returning 
after the arrest, receive Sitting Bull 
from them and bring him to the 
agency — this, to prevent his rescue, 
should such an attempt be made. 





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Ill N ■ w 

m 







RED TOMAHAWK, WHO KILLED SITTING BULL. 
Photo, by Scott. 

The greatest secrecy was observed, 
lest Bull should hear of the move- 
ment. The policemen arrived at 
Bull's house at early dawn and 
arrested him in the name of the 
United States Government. He agreed 
to go with them. Then they let him 
dress, aided by his two wives. A 
great deal of time was thus con- 
sumed. Suddenly one of his sons, 
who was in the room, a deaf and 
dumb boy subject to epileptic fits, 
uttered one of his strange cries. This 
aroused Bull's followers, who were 



SITTING BULLS LAST MEDICI Mi. 



21 I 



sleeping in the surrounding tepees, 
and they dashed to the house as he 
and the policemen were leaving it. 
Crow Foot, a young man of 19, and 
another of Bulls sons, taunted their 
father with allowing himself to be 
taken. They repeatedly asked him 
if he would go. Sitting Bull, stung 
to action, then refused to go, saying, 
" I will die first." 

At this one of his band, named 
Catch-the-Bear, fired at the police- 
men, the bullet wounding Bull Head, 
the first lieutenant of police, in the 
leg. The hostiles had fired the first 
shot, and the policemen, seeing that 
nothing now could prevent a fight, 
and fearful lest Sitting Bull should 
escape, were ready for action. 
Bull Head, who was on Sitting 
Bull's left, and whose thigh was 
broken, as well as Red Tomahawk, 
the first sergeant, who was on his 
right, fired at the medicine man 




ONE BULL, NEPHEW OF AND SUCCESSOR TO 
SITTING BULL. 

simultaneously, and the old chieftain, 
the hero of many wars, fell dead. 

Then a fearful fight followed be- 
tween the 43 policemen and Sitting 
Bull's band of about 125 warriors. 
Both sides were poorly armed, and 



when the guns would fail to dis- 
charge they used them for clubs. 
Many guns were found broken, lying 
about on the scene of battle in tin- 
morning. 

The fight continued with terril 
fierceness until the brave little bind 
of policemen routed the I10M1 es and 
drove them out of the village. So 
intense was the feeling of hom 
progressive Indians against Sitting 
Bull that even his own relatives 
showed no pity. Grey Eagle, who 
was not a policeman, but a judge 
the police court, and who had vol- 
unteered to go on the expedition. 
was a brother-in-law of Hull. He 
was appealed to in the thick of the 
fight by Crow Foot, his own nephew 
and a bon of the chief, to save him; 
but Grey Eagle would not intercede 
for the young hostile and he was 
killed. 

Meantime the cavalry had orders 
to proceed to Oak Creek, a point 
25 miles from Fort Yates, and it 
quietly marched out of the post at 
midnight of December 1 .). 1 
There were two troops of the 8th 
Cavalry officered by Captain 1 I r, 
Fechet, First-Lieutenant E. 11. 
Crowder, Second-Lieutenant I 
Brooks, of " G, ' Troop, and First- 
Lieutenant S. L. II. Slocum, Se< ond- 
Lieutenant M. F. Steele, of " I 
Troop, Assistant-Surgeon A. 1\. Cha- 
pin and two agency guides, all under 
the command of Captain Fechet. 
Arriving at Oak Creek before day- 
break and not finding the couriei 
whom they had expected, reporting 
the receipt of the orders carried by 
the detachment of police who had 
left the agency on the preceding twi- 
light, the cavalry pushed on to w ithin 
four miles of Sitting Bull's vill 
fully expecting to be fired upon from 
each clump of trees, or sin 
rock, by hiding hostil 

Suddenly along the road, tl 
fog and rain, appeared an In 
policeman with pa and wild 

eyes, full of intense excitement, who 
told of the killing of all the pol 
men but himself. The command, 
stopping only long enough to dis- 



212 



RECREATION. 



patch the messenger on to Fort Yates, 
nearly 40 miles away, dashed on. 

Half a mile farther they met 
a second policeman, whose siory 
brought hope with it. He told 
of Sitting Bull's arrest ; of the 
resistance by the hostiles; of the 
death of the old chief and the fear- 
ful fight that ensued. Many police- 
men were killed — how many he could 
not say — and a number of hostiles. 
Dispatching him also to the post, 
the cavalry pushed on at a rapid trot, 
with the Hotchkiss and Gatlingguns 
ready for action at any moment. 




RATN-IN-THE-FACE. PROMINENT IN CUS- 
TER MASSACRE. 

Halting on a high plateau over- 
looking Sitting Bull's village about 
2,000 yards away, they could see fig- 
ures moving about near the houses. 
The lieutenant in charge of the 
Hotchkiss aimed to the right of a 
cabin, where he saw puffs of smoke 
coming from the brush, and fired. 
Learning from the agency guide 
which was Sitting Bull's house, and 
supposing ittobethe hostiles' strong- 
hold, he sent in another shell, which 
struck and exploded a little to the 



right, killing two ponies. Then the 
cavalry on the right began firing with 
carbines. A number of figures that 
the troops had seen lying on 
the crest. of some low hills, 
and whom they supposed were 
the policemen, started to run, 
and the situation was quickly taken 
in. Accepting the last messenger's 
story, they had supposed the hostiles 
were in the village. Several more 
shots, now directed to the uplands, 
sent the band fleeing in all directions. 

A line of men filed out of the 
house, and one of the guides, hearing 
his name called, said: 

"Listen! They're calling — 'It's 
us!' It's us!' ' 

Then these policemen lined up in 
military fashion and two came up 
on horseback from the valley to 
meet the troops, carrying the ghost 
shirt in front of them. 

The whole command returned to 
the village, where a pathetic sight 
met their eyes. 

The cavalry had come none too 
soon, for, while not nearly so many 
were killed as told by the courier, 
yet the survivors were in a sad plight. 
Almost out of ammunition (except- 
ing some that would not fit the guns, 
and that had been hurriedly given to 
the men at the agency), nearly worn 
out with the fight, they could have 
illy withstood the hostiles, so much 
stronger than their own band, had they 
attacked the police later in the day. 

The timely arrival of the troops 
saved the day and the ghost dancers 
fled in wild confusion. They were 
not pursued, and later, when the vil- 
lage was deserted, they returned for 
their belongings and fled to the south. 

In a log house in the village lay 
seven policemen, four dead, two mor- 
tally and one seriously wounded. They 
were brave beyond words, those dying 
Sioux; every soldier honored them. 
They never murmured when the 
post surgeon probed for the bullets, 
though the pain must have been al- 
most unbearable. They said they 
were glad to die thus, having per- 
formed their duty to their Govern- 
ment and their children. 



SITTING BULLS LAST MEDICINE. 



213 








FUNERAL OF POLICEMEN KILLED IN SITTING BULL FIGHT. STANDING 

AND FORT YATES IN THE BACKGROUND. 



ROCK \(.l \< \ 



Photo, by Scott 

The most tender care was given 
them by their brethren and by the 
troops, and these men, used as they 
were to great courage and to acts 
of bravery, marvelled at the heroism 
shown by these simple-minded red 
men when their lives were fast ebb- 
ing away. 

The village was searched, and one 
officer with a squad of men made a 
tour of the houses and tepees. In 
one of the former, two Indian women 
were found, sitting on a bed crying. 
John Eagle Man, a policeman who 
had been through the morning's fight, 
told the officer he thought there were 
hostiles near. The squaws were 
ordered to rise, but refused, and were 
finally led across the room. The 
bedding was raised and underneath 
were hidden two Indian lads of 14 
and 18. They were taken prisoners, 
later conveyed totheagencyand then 
released. Had they fallen into the 
policemen's hands that morning they 
would have fared rather worse, as 
one was a nephew of Sitting Bull, 
who had brought such sadness to 



& Lander, Wyo. 

their brave little band and to the 
Sioux Nation at large. 

In the early afternoon the return 
march to the post began. The wound- 
ed were driven with all speed to 
the agency hospital, where they ar- 
rived at midnight. 

The dead policemen were placed 
on a wagon, with the body of Sitting 
Bull, and taken away. 

The command camped that night 
at Oak Creek, where the infantry, un- 
der Colonel Drum, met them, and the 
next day the chad and living reached 
Fort Yates and Standing Rock once 
more. Poor Shave Head died that 
night, though everything possible 
had been done to save him. The 
dead Sioux, including Sitting Hull, 
were buried in the agency cemel 

Thus ended tin- life of the 

aged chief of the Uncapapas, and 
Tah-tank-ah-Yo-tah-kee, as he was 
called by his people, had made his 
last medicine. Tin- brave cavalry- 
men killed in the battle oi the Little 
Big Horn were avenged by the \ 
Sioux w h > had slain them. 




214 




215 




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216 



A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA 



S. B. Hopkins. 




T nine o'clock, on a 
bright December 
morning, we board- 
ed the comfortable 
steamer "Alene," of 
the Atlas S. S. Co.'s 
line, at its pier in 
New York, and 
sailed under sunny 
skies ; but when off Cape Hatteras, 
dark stormy weather made us feel 
dull and spiritless, although we were 
a jolly company of health and 
pleasure- seekers. The next day, 
however, this cloud on nature's face 
passed off, and we sailed into warmer 
waters. 

Nearing the Bahamas, great flights 
of flying fish rose about us, chased 
by some enemy. Their silvery sides 
flashing in the sunlight made spirited 
pictures. Great reaches of water 
here and there seemed carpeted with 
yellow moquetrie, which proved to 



be sea-weed floating on the surface 

in great masses, through which we 
plowed our way. The screws became 
entangled in it once, and the engines 
had to be stopped until it could In- 
cut off. Soon after we entered a 
group of low-lying summer isles, 
punctuatedby numerous lighthou 
telling of the watchful guard which 
the Government exercises over all 
mariners. 

The fifth day brought the island oi 
Cuba in sight, and we rounded the 
eastern end, leaving llavti and San 
Domingo in the distance, on our 
left. 

We were told that we would see 
the blue peaks of Jamaica in the 
early morning. This gave zest and 
expectancy to our slumber, and, at 
daylight, we were charmed with t lie 
sight of crumpled hills, and 
palms, fringing the shore. Little 
sails dotted the coast waters, set by 




A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA.— NATIVE FISHERMEN. 

217 



218 



RECREATION, 




A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA.— FALLS OF ROARING RIVER. 



fishermen, who go out at mid- 
night, returning at break of day, with 
their catch of fish or lobsters. We 
secured a good photograph of a 
typical fishing boat and its occupants. 

As we neared the dock at Kings- 
ton, the ship was surrounded by 
small craft of various kinds, occupied 
by a medley of nationalities, and 
enlivened with speech in many 
strange tongues. All were anxious 
to sell us something or serve us in 
some way, in order that they might 
possess our small change. Though 
glad to be at the end of our voyage, 
we left the " Alene " with feelings of 
genuine regret, for she is a delightful 
craft, and her officers are ever cour- 
teous, and attentive to the wants of 
passengers. 

Finally, as we walked down the 
gang plank, we were saluted with a 
din of "'Bus, sir! Take a'bus,sir!" — all 
from negro drivers. We selected 
one of the staunchest looking of the 
rickety little traps, which was 
drawn by a pair of woolly ponies, and 
for 12 cents each, were driven to our 
hotel near the beach. We were 



told that for 75 cents each we could 
be taken to the large hotel in the 
mountains, 6 miles away. As we 
afterward learned, by sampling, both 
houses are excellent, and their rates 
are low. Everything one needs is 
cheap in Jamaica. 

After a cursory examination of 
Kingston and its lake-like harbor, we 
were invited by a gentleman to visit 
his sugar plantation, 80 miles away. 
An early train took us through a 
level plain 14 miles wide, and then 
the iron horse climbed the hills, 
which were fringed with bamboo, 
whose graceful plumes waved joy- 
fully in the tropical breezes. 

Houses are few and far between. 
Here and there a peasant's hut is 
seen, standing on an acre or so of 
cultivated ground ; then a herd of 
cattle, or a few sheep or horses. 
There are green pastures of tall 
grass, banana plantations, and a 
variety of trees and birds indigenous 
to a tropical climate. 

The journey of four hours ended at 
the terminus of the railroad, where 
we were met by a light carriage 



A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA. 






drawn by a pair of wiry little nags, 
corresponding to our Texas mus- 
tangs. These took us over a good 
road, at a rapid gait, six miles to our 
destination. The " great house," or 
proprietor's residence, stands on a 
hill. It is one-storied, with high 
ceiling, allowing ample space for 
ventilation. The kitchen and ser- 
vants' apartments are in a separate 
building across the courtyard. The 
mill is under the hill, and is over- 
looked by the foreman's house, which 
is on another hill opposite. 

This plantation of 4,000 acres pro- 
duces a fine grade of rum, which is 
contracted for before it is made, and 
on its production the proprietor de- 
pends for his principal revenue, as 
sugar-growing on the island is not a 
profitable industry. 

Thanks to the well-known hospi- 
tality of the people, our visit was one 
of intense pleasure and interest. 
With a view to gratifying our love of 
sport, our genial host arranged a 
shooting expedition to the Bread-nut 
valley, so called on account of the 
large number of trees there, bearing 
that name. These, growing to a 
height of 100 feet or more, are 
crowned with leaves and berries, 
forming a breakfast table for the 
wild pigeons, which flock to their 
morning meal in great numbers. 



Starting about five o'clock, a shorl 
ride placed us in the grove, and we 
awa'.ted their coming. A good shot 
will easily bag a dozen brace in an 
hour. The ringtail pigeon is said to 
be the finest of all. They are pi.. 
tected by law four months in the 
year, and although the mop .111 

animal imported into the island from 
India, to kill rats has thinned the 
birds out along the coast, yet in the 
interior they are plentiful. 

Other varieties of the pigeon 
family found here are the lapwing, 
white belly, ringtail, blur pigeon, 
pea dove and blue dove. Then there 
are quails, pheasants, parrots, paro- 
quets, hopping dicks and glass-eyes. 

After enjoying the shooting for an 
hour, we lunched beside a beautiful 
waterfall, and then returned to the 
great house. 

On a certain windy morning, we 
started for a swamp, expecting that 
a previous " Norther " had driven 
over from Florida, as usual, flocks oi 
wild ducks, plover, etc. We found 
these, as well as snipe, abundant, but 
not having a retriever, we only bag- 
ged about a dozen. 

Another day was spent in alligator 
hunting. These saurians are small 
in Jamaica, and the method ol sh< 
ing them there differs from that ot 
any other country I have been in. 




A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA.— LOCAL TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES. 



220 



RECREATION. 




A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA. — A GRACEFUL BRIDGE. 



The hunter there takes a pig, ties it 
at the edge of some water known to 
be the haunt of the 'gator, and then, 
secreting himself, waits for the game 
to come after the bait. Presently 
the saurian comes slowly to the sur- 
face, some distance from the shore, 
puts his nose and eyes out-sniffs and 
looks. Seeing the porker, and no 
one else being in sight, he swims 
slowly to land. As soon as he 
emerges from the wafer, the shooter 
loads him up with buckshot. Then 
he takes his 'gator and his pig and 
returns home. This method requires 
a good deal of patience, and does not 
furnish any great amount of excite- 
ment. We stayed long enough to 
bag two 'gators. 

We spent another day fishing, in a 
creek, for mountain mullet, and en- 
joyed the sport immensely. This is 
one of the finest fishes I have ever 
eaten. They are very shy, and it re- 
quires an expert fisherman to capture 
them. 

Land turtles are also plentiful on 
the island, but their capture was not 
sufficiently interesting to induce me 



to look for them. I preferred bird 
shooting to any of the other sports. 

The native blacks are a queer, 
picturesque people. Their habits 
are exceedingly primitive, and their 
wants few and simple. They have 
little use for wheels, preferring to 
pack everything on donkeys, or on 
their own heads or backs. 

On a country road, or in a city 
street, you will often meet the women 
leading their patient little beasts, 
bearing great panniers laden with 
vegetables, fruit or firewood — all 
headed for the market place. 

The roads on the island are gener- 
ally smooth and hard, affording the 
most delightful drives everywhere. 
At one point of our explorations, we 
crossed the most beautiful stream of 
the island, on a queer, yet graceful, 
old stone bridge, of one span. A 
mile lower, at an expansion of the 
stream, is a novel and primitive ferry, 
for foot passengers only. 

•The climate in that part of the 
island called the Santa Cruz District, 
is delightful. The air is almost en- 
tirely free from humidity, and the 



A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA. 



■> 2 i 



thermometer seldom rises above 8o°. 
The railroad is being pushed into the 
interior by an American syndicate 
who bought out the Government 
interest of the few miles then in ex- 
istence, opening upthousands of acres 
of abandoned and virgin land. 

The Colonial government gives 
careful attention and liberal support 
to the public parks and gardens. 
There are seven of these in and near 
Kingston, all of which are delight- 
fully interesting. 

The Botanic Garden, Castleton, is 
in the parish of St. Mary, on the 
Junction Road connecting Kingston 
with Annotto Bay, 19 miles from 
Kingston and 10 miles from Annotto 
Bay. This garden contains a large 
collection of native and foreign 
tropical plants. The chief features 
are the palmetum and a collection 
of economic, spice and fruit trees. 

The Hill Garden and Government 
Cinchona Plantation is in the Parish 
of St. Andrew, on the slopes of the 
Blue mountains, about 21 miles from 
Kingston, by way of Gordon Town. 
These plantations consist of 143 



acres under cinchona, with smaller 
areas, amounting in all to about 7 
acres, under tea, and nurseries 
timber and shade trees. 

The Hope Garden, of about 2 
acres, is near the foot of tin- hills in 
Liguanea Plains, five miles from 
Kingston. It is the chief botanic 
garden of the island. Until latel) 
only about 13 acres were cleared, 
and of these 7 acres were planted 
with teak, the remaining being 
under cultivation with varieties ol 
sugar cane, nutmeg, cocoa, etc. 

The ground has been, to a great 1 
tent, cleared of bush and trees. I lu- 
inner portion is being laid out as a 
Geographical Botanic Garden, but it 
will be some years before much ad- 
vance can be perceived. Carri; 
drives of a total length of more than 
two miles have been laid out in this 
portion of the garden. There are 
large nurseries containing about 40,- 
000 plants, such as cocoa, rubber 
plants, nutmeg, clove, black pepper, 
mango, vanilla, cardamon, sarsapar- 
illa, cinnamon, Liberian coffee, etc. 

Kingston Parade Garden is the 




A WINTER TRIP TO JAMAICA. A PRIM1TIVJ M I 



222 



RECREATION. 



public pleasure garden of Kingston, 
and is kept up with shade and orna- 
mental trees, flowering plants, tanks 
and fountains. 

Botanic Garden at Bath is the old 
botanic garden of the colony, estab- 
lished in 1774 ; still maintained for 
the sake of its valuable trees and 
palms, though much reduced in size. 

King's House gardens and grounds 
contain about 177 acres, of which 
about 20 acres are kept up as an 
ornamental garden attached to the 
official residence of the Governor. 



Many valuable economic plants and 
fruit trees are also under cultivation, 
as well as the rarer tropical palms. 

The Palisadoes Plantation occupies 
the long narrow strip of land inclos- 
ing Kingston Harbor, about 5 
miles long, planted with about 
23,000 cocoanut palms. This planta 
tion is now leased. 

After a most enjoyable season of 
rest and recreation in this delight- 
ful island, we sailed on one of 
the Plant line steamers for Tampa, 
thence by rail home. 



CROSSING THE PLAINS THIRTY YEARS AGO. 

Gen. John Gibbon, U. S. A. 




GIBBON'S CAMP ON THE LITTLE BLUE. 



Gibbon's Camp on the Blue. 

" June 19, i860. 

* A I a he above sketch was made 
on the spot by our special 
artist. It represents with 
great accuracy the position of our 
tents, ambulances, etc., with a 
correct likeness of Mrs. G. in 
the foreground, reposing after the 
labors of the day in the shade of 
Mrs. M.'s tent. At first sight she 
appears to be seated on a chair, the 
greater part of which is seen behind 
her, but this is an optical delusion 
resulting from her hoops (now far 
below par) concealing the chair on 
which she is in fact seated, the one 
seen in the picture being to the right 
and rear. 

"Yesterday and to-day we made 
marches of about 18 miles each, 
passing through the first real 
prairie we have seen. It was a dead 



level for several miles, and as far as 
the eye could reach on every side, 
nothing was to be seen but a green 
plain in the midst of which marched 
our train. At the end of the march 
we again came in sight of the timber 
of the Little Blue, on the bank of 
which we pitched our camp, with 
plenty of wood, water and grass. 
We hear that four or five miles from 
our road plenty of buffalo are to be 
found, but as yet we have seen none 
and do not expect to see any this 
side of Kearney. The emigration 
along this route is so large that all 
game is scared out of the country. 
A large ox-train belonging to the 
contractor is now traveling along 
the road. Ten or twelve, in some 
cases fourteen oxen are yoked to 
each wagon, and we pass them every 
day on the road. They usually start 
before us in the morning and camp 
bevond us in the evening, but their 



CROSSING THE PLAINS THIRTY YEARS AGO. 






gait is much slower than ours and 
they are all day in making their 
marches. Many of them look in 
very poor order and as if badly pre- 
paied for a march of i2co miles. I 
am officer of the day, to-night, and 
am trying to sit up till twelve o'clock 
in order to visit the sentinels, as it is 
now necessary to have them well in- 
structed in their responsible duties, 
to be ready for the Indian country 
which we are approaching. For the 
first time the order is given for the 
officer of the day to stay with his 
guard in the rear during the march ; 
so that I shall have to send my 
family ahead to-morrow and come 
on behind with the men. 



" On the Platte, 10 Miles below 
Kearney, 

"Friday, June 22. 

" I gave Sullivan the reins of my 
ambulance, while Lieut. D. volunteer- 
ed to drive Mrs. M. It was hot and 
dusty, and as I was a good deal de- 
layed picking up stragglers, I did not 
reach camp until after one o'clock, 
more than two hours after the com- 
mand. It was heavy work and the 
men suffered a good deal from the 
heat, dust and sandy roads. I had 
them take off their shoes and stock- 
ings and bathe their feet, which help- 
ed them very much. The march to- 
day was the longest we have yet made. 
21% miles. Colonel May* passed 
camp in the stage on his way to attend 
a court at Leavenworth. He brought 
two New York Heralds, and the news 
of the death of General Jesup and 
Colonel Plympton. The Heralds 
gave us the only news of civiliza- 
tion we have had for the past two 
weeks, and were appreciated accord- 
ingly. 

"Yesterday I resumed the reins and 
drove all day, but at the end of the 
march was obliged to declare mysell 
beaten and go to bed. We had no 
wood last night, but excellent cool 
water from a well close by our camp. 

*Bvt. Col. Charles May, of Mexican War 
fame. He was commanding at Fort Kearney. 



Buffalo were again reported within 
four or five miles of us, In I, 
herds, and once when at a high point 
we thought we could sec. at 
distance, with our glasses, .1 
number of them on the top oi a hill. 

"We had a cool, pleasant day tor 
marching, to-day, passing through 
pretty much the same kind of a high 
rolling prairie as usual, but without 
seeing any timber or much w 
until we struck the valley o( the 
Platte. The course of the rivi 
marked out by large timber, am 
we ascended the hills, bounding tin- 
valley on the south, a numbei 
emigrant wagons were seen au,r 
to the right, winding their way all 
the road from St. Joseph. As 
turned off the road low aid the river, 
to encamp, several dark objei ts v. 
seen in the distance apparently ap- 
proaching at speed. These proved 
to be six buffalo, pursued by Lieut. 
Villipigue, on a mule. 1 le could 
however, induce his mule to clos< 
the chase and soon gave it up. A 
the buffalo were running directly 
towards the column, tiny soon had 
other horsemen after them; but they 
made their escape, although one was 
afterwards reported killed by 1 
the emigrants on the road. The 
chase was exciting and made me 
the more anxious for my first ex] 
ence in buffalo hunting. 

•'We an* camped 011 a fine la 1 
branch of the Platte, with any 
quantity of mosquitoes near the 
bank, but comparatively tew wl 
our tents are. and nothing but bufl 
chips for fuel. Two nights ago I 
undertook to roasl a beef head in the 
ground, but they did not 1 
enough, and tin- head had ' 
brought on to camp la-: ni 
finish cooking it. and aftei 
val to-day I opened it an< 
very good. The skin is left on and 
tied around the neck 
the dirt ; the horns 
and a hole large - n< ugh 1 
the head is dug near tl 1 
Inthis afire is built until the earth 
gets well heated. Thi 
tiun shovelled out and tin- hi 



224 



RECREATION. 







A BATTALION FOOT-BATH. 



CROSSING THE PLAINS THIRTY YEARS AGO. 



i i - 



thrown in, covered with three or does not know what fear is walked 

four inches of earth and the camp boldly up and stood staring at them 

fire built over it and kept up all with great apparent satisfaction and 

night. In winter, and where there curiosity. 



is plenty of wood, the head is well 
done by morning; but as we have 
now warm weather and no great 
abundance of wood, it took two nights 
to finish this one. As 1 was sick and 
unable to attend to it in person, I 
found the soldiers had not buried it 
deep enough and had burned off part 
of the skin, allowing some dirt to 
get in. The meat is soft and tender 
and the tongue like marrow. 

" We are within 10 miles of 
Kearney, having marched to-day 
22 miles. Lieutenant Berry, 2d 
Dragoons, rode into camp soon 
after our tents were pitched and is 



"One naturally associates with a 
fort the idea of some prominent 
strategical point; but Fori Kearney 
is an exception to this, for as fai 
its military position is concerned, it 
may as well have been placed 
miles above or below where it is. 
Aside from a flagstaff in the center 
the only other prominent military 
objects consist of 12 24-pounder 
field howitzers, standing on one side 
of the Square, mounted on carria 
for flank casement defem It is 

difficult to imagine how these tish- 
out- of -water looking carria 
could have wandered so far 



giving us all the news of the country, from their legitimate positions, un- 
He called in, just as we were going less our authorities in Washington 
to dinner, to invite us to to take have been as much misled by the 
possession of his quarters on our arri- term fort as more ordinary mortals. 
val at Fort Kearney to-morrow. I Possi'bly my estimate of the p 
accepted his offer on sight, as I have was lowered from the fact that I here 
no doubt we will find a house a very learned that my batten- has 1 
agreeable change and an advantage- broken up by Colonel Smith, ruin- 
ous one for three days, which will manding in Utah, and sent off as 
probably be the length of our visit. dragoons after Indians 600 miles 

west of Camp Floyd. It is difficult 

" Fort Kearney, June 24. to say what could have been the 

" We reached here early yesterday circumstances which would justify 

morning. We find Fort Kearney an such a course, by which the sen 

open square surrounded by mud and of an indifferent company <>t dra- 

frame buildings, standing out in the goons is obtained in exchange for an 

flat open prairie with no sort of almost total destruction ol the only 

artificial defenses, and people sleep- artillery within reach. It is thought 

ing soundly with doors wide open, the company will be back and 

From this may be inferred how little mounted by the time we reach ( amp 

regard is paid to Indians in this part Floyd, 
of the country. A band of Cheyennes, 



who were on a war expedition 
against the Pawnees, came in yester- 
day, all dressed out with their lances 
and rifles and riding on horseback. 
We all went out to inspect, and it 
was amusing to see them lean for- 
ward and look at little Fannie, who is 
nowburnt almostto the color of one of 
them. I suppose they were specu- 
lating as to what kind of a squaw she 



" We left Fort Kearney on Tu< 

day the 26th (June >. and ha\ 
since been travelling along the 
valley of the Platte, or Nel 1 
river. The valley is a dvA^\ level, in 
the middle of which flows the TV 
n< >w rapid and muddy as it from ra • 
and nearly up to the top of its ban 

" I amused mysell as we 
along fancying the time when fi 



would make. She did not seem to the crowded population in the 

take to them quite so readily and this country will be thicl 

stood by, holding my hand as if not this valley cut up into I 

exactly at her ease; while Katie, who cultivated farms w it li fruit ma- 



226 



RECREATION. 



mental trees in abundance, and the 
sand hills on the left crowned with 
fine country residences. That this 
time will come, I have but little 
doubt. All the country wants is 
fuel, and no doubt coal beds will be 
discovered after a while, or in case 
they are not, railroads will be built 
communicating with the wooded dis- 
tricts which are in some places not 
over 30 or 40 miles distant from this 
river." 



This semi-sarcastic prediction has 
been more than realized in the 
31 years since it was playfully writ- 
ten to amuse the " old folks at home." 



the Indians, many prominent men of 
the country, who made speeches in 
favor of justice being done to the 
Indians. In the midst of the pro- 
ceedings Mr. Wm. Welsh, well 
known for his prominence on the 
Indian question, noticed one of the 
chiefs seated on the rear of the stage 
looking very sad and despondent, 
and Mr. Welsh tried for some time 
to draw from him the cause of his 
sadness. At last he was induced to 
tell his story, which was this: Some 
years before a delegation from his 
tribe had gone East. They returned 
with such wonderful stories of what 
they had seen regarding railroads, 



<&&&&9 9 + 



K.dJffS^. 



fljjjgjgggvS 



-X^FTl 



(£'. ••!*.:£. 



**=-; 



gfcnk Hills 




■A. j7j t u 1 a. n c e 



SECTIONAL VIEW OF THE PLATTE VALLEY. 



T^IVGr 



Tree 



A great transcontinental railroad 
now runs along the valley divided 
into beautiful cultivated farms, "with 
fruit and ornamental trees in abun- 
dance." The trains on this road 
carry thousands of passengers every 
year, and thousands of tons of coal 
from the coal beds of almost unlimi- 
ted extent that have been discovered 
farther west. Not only are these 
things true, but along the valley are 
thriving towns and ' villages which 
have sprung up since the road was 
built, and are calculated to remind 
one of the experience of an Indian 
which I heard related once as com- 
ing from the mouth of a chief who 
was one of a delegation visiting the 
East, from one of our western tribes. 
A large delegation of Indians 
was brought from the West, and after 
visiting Washington, they were taken 
to New York, Philadelphia, and 
other large cities. At Philadel- 
phia a number of those friendly to 
the red men got up quite an ovation 
for them in the Academy of Music, 
The house was densely crowded and 
on the stage were seated, beside 



steamboats, houses, etc., but especially 
in regard to the number of whites, 
that the tribe said the white man had 
put "bad medicine" in their heads 
and they could tell nothing but lies ! 
The man who told the story was then 
a young and ambitious chief and made 
aspeech, tellingthetribe that heknew 
just how the white man fooled the red 
man in regard to his numbers; that 
they crowded in front of them and 
then, when the red men started ahead 
again, the white men slipped around 
the hills and got in front, so that the 
Indians counted them over and over 
again, and that the next time a dele- 
gation was sent East the tribe must 
select him to go and when he came 
back he would tell them the truth. 
In a few years another delegation 
was called for, and the tribe, remem- 
bering what he had said, selected 
him to go. He then determined he 
would keep an account of every 
white man he saw, and when he left 
his camp took with him a stick upon 
which he notched down every one he 
came across. This was easy for a 
while, but when he began to enter 



CROSSING THE PLAINS THIRTY YEARS Add 



2 27 



the settlements the men became 
more numerous, and the ranches 
closer together, with two or three 
men to each. So he decided to 
notch down the ranches instead of 
the men, and allow so many whites to 
each one. After a while they came 
to the railroad, and found a white 
man's village where there were more 
tepees in one place than he had 
seen in his whole trip. Then 
they got on the cars and every few 
miles passed one of these villages, 
each larger than the other, so that 
he had to commence keeping an 
account of the towns on his stick. 
Then they reached Omaha, where he 
could not see from one end of 
the town to the other. Then 
Chicago, Washington, New York and 
Philadelphia, where they rode for 
miles and miles through solid blocks 
of houses, the streets all filled with 
people. Now he had found out that 
what former delegations had told 
them was true, and that he would 
have to go back and tell his people 
the same old story. They would say 
of him, as they had said of them, 
that the white man had put bad medi- 
cine in his head and he could tell 
nothing but lies. That was what 
made him so sad. 

Now, which ought to have been the 
most surprised, this Indian, who 
traveled from the wilderness in 
which he lived, to the civilized land of 
the white man, or the white man who, 
having seen the wilderness 30 years 
ago, goes back and finds a country 
which he then saw filled with herds 
of buffalo and savage Indians, trans- 
formed into a rich agricultural 
country with fine farms, flourishing 
towns, and railroads in every direc- 
tion? 



unable to travel. One- of those 
numerous characters ever on the 
lookout in a country like this for a 
bargain, saw her, admired her, and 
offered me $15 for her. 1 [ad his 
offer been $5 instead of $15, I should 
have been obliged to accepl it, .1- she 
could not travel, and under the cir- 
cumstances I rather think the 
had some liberal ideas about him. 
As it was I lost our cow, and $20 by 
the bargain, besides being deprh 
of fresh milk on the road. We get 
it now from the cows in the herd, but 
in very limited quantity 






The journal continues ; " The 
second day out from Kearney we 
met with a great loss in being oblig- 
ed to sell our cow at a sacrifice. She 
was a fine animal, cost $35, and I ex- 
pected good service from her in 
Utah, to say nothing of the journey. 
But she took sick after the loss of 
her calf, and became so weak as to be 



In this region where we so pitifully 

deplored the loss of a single cow, 
there are to-day immense herds 
domestic cattle, almost as numerous 
as the buffalo were then. In the 
month of June, as he glides along in 
a Pullman car, the traveller may 
the whole surface of the country, for 
miles, covered with these herds, 
rounded up by the cowboys that each 
owner may claim his own, and brand 
the calves which have been born 
since the mothers themselves were 
branded, two or three years before. 
Those who have never seen the oper 
ation may wonder how it is thai a 
man can recognize a calf as his prop- 
erty which he has never sel eyes 
before, and they will perhaps 
surprised when they learn that the 
mother of the calf gives the owner, 
or his cowboy, the information. 
When the herd is all concentrated 
with a cordon of cowboys around it. 
the process of cutting out com- 
mences. A boy sees .1 1 <>\\ bearing 
his brand and immediately pro 
to cut her out by forcing his h< 
into the herd and running her out on 
to the prairie. The po< ;ins 

to bellow for her calf. The little 
one responds and joins his mother. 
In the mean time < >ther o w I 
cutting out other cows with different 
brands, and other calves are rushing 
out to join their motln 
as they go. The racket is kept up 
until the great herd is divided up i 
half a do/en smaller one-. ea< 1 
these distinguished by a particular 



228 



RECREATION. 












ON THE ROUND-UP. — HOLDING THE HERD. 



brand. Each is surrounded by herd- 
ers who prevent the brands from in- 
termingling again, and who drive 
them to a corral, where the calves 
are thrown and branded. Very few 
escape without a brand, but some do, 
and when the next year an unbranded 
yearling is found, it is known as a 
"" maverick." The origin of this 
name is curious. Cattle raising in 
large numbers first commenced in 
Texas, and it was some time before 



the system of herding and branding 
was perfected. 

The story runs that a shrewd 
fellow named Maverick always 
•'recognized " and claimed as his all 
unbranded year-old calves and stuck 
his brand on them. It is presumed, 
that when he began to get larger 
herds than his neighbors, their eyes 
began to open to the fact that 
Maverick was a first-rate " claim 
agent," and that he claimed every- 




ON THE ROUND-UP. — "BRING ME THOSE TRADE MARK." 



CROSSING THE PLAINS THIRTY YEARS AGO. 



22() 



thing that nobody else could swear 
to. Be this as it may, his name has 
been handed down through all these 
years, but no one is now permitted 
to follow his example ; for whenever 
an unbranded animal is discovered, 
the "maverick " is taken up, sold at 
public auction, the buyer's brand 
put on it, and the amount credited 
to the Cattle Association which gov- 
erns in that section of the country. 



The journal continues: " June 30th. 
We have to-day camped on the bank 
of the river about 100 miles west of 
Kearney, at a point where the sand 
hills have assumed a more broken 



tracks worn by them as in times past 
they followed each other in single 
file from their grazing-grounds to 

their watering-places. These tracks 
are now overgrown with { rass and 
remind one, like the grass-grown 
streets of some deserted cit) . of tin- 
vast population which has pas 
along them. They are rather for 
cibly brought to one's mind, even 
when unseen, by the bumping of the 
ambulance, as its wheels go over 
them. 

Sunday, July 1st. We are encamped 
in a beautiful position on a fine stream 
of running water called Fremont's 
slough, within sight of the Platte, and 




ON THE ROUND-UP. 



appearance and are nearer the water. 
At our camps for several nights past 
it was only necessary to walk through 
thehigh grass to raise myriads of mos- 
quitoes, which would buzz about our 
ears, cover our clothes, and attack 
with their sharp bite every exposed 
part of the face and hands. A brisk 
breeze has usually sprung up to 
drive them off, but last night they 
got into the tents in considerable 
numbers and to-night we think of 
looking to our bars for protection. 

"We have seen but eight or ten 
buffalo since leaving Kearney, al- 
though the valley is crossed by deep 



half a mile from the campofaboul 
Sioux, with women and children, some 
of whom were in Gen. Harney's last 
battle. They are a wild looki 
and soon overran our camp pre] 
ed to beg anything or everythn 
but the Colonel sent them off. 1 
in the day, while I was off on a hunt, 
they came into camp, when F. and the 
children had a good li them, 

and little Fannie exchanged a j»: 
of hard bread for a bird, shot with 
an arrow, by an ugly little urchin 
dressed in tin- ininumun amount 
rags usual among them. 

" We are now getting into a m< 



230 



RECREATION, 



broken and interesting country. 
The hills rise higher and steeper on 
both sides the river ; we have been 
gradually rising all day, and begin to 
appreciate the fact that we are getting 
well on our road to the Rocky 
Mountains and that we are rising in 
the world. I shot a large long-billed 
curlew this evening, and saw two 
prairie chickens and a number of 
ducks which were, however, too wild 
for me to get a shot at. We are getting 
into a better game country. This 
feeling was increased by Mr. D. 
sending us some fine slices of ven- 
son, killed to-day by the Indians. 

"We meet every day trains coming 
in from Pike's Peak, the wagons 
mostly drawn by oxen, and filled 
with men who look as if thev had 



had a hard time of it out in the gold 
diggin's. They are ragged and dirty 
enough to have been away from 
water and their wives for the last six 
months. Now and then a woe- 
begone woman is seen in the wagons, 
and everybody looks at us as we 
pass as if glad to see a face just from 
1 the States.' " 

The travel described in this paper 
from Fort Kearney up was all along 
the main Platte and its South Fork. 
In the next paper we shall cross the 
South Fork at a ford, in the midst of 
great excitment, and turning up one 
of its branches, Lodge Pole Creek, 
cross over to the North Fork of the 
Platte, follow up that, and in the next 
succeeding paper reach the far-famed 
post of Fort Laramie. 



EDWARD RICHARDS. 




This is a correct likeness of Master 
Edward Richards, of California, aged 17 
years, who, at Stockton, Cal., on August 5 
last, using American E. C. powder, broke 98 
targets out of a possible 100, making the 
record of his State for a youth of his age, if 
not the best record on targets ever made by 
a resident of California. He is a good shot 
on live birds, both pt the trap and in the 
field, and in the tournaments in which he 
has participated this year, has made the older 
trap shots of the Pacific coast hustle for their 
laurels. Master Richards shoots a steady, 
even race, one day with another, keeping 
well up with the best scores made in any 
event. His friends confidently expect to see 
him wear the State championship badge 
within two years. 



An old farmer up in Cayuga count}' has a corn-crib 
built in the shape of an L. In the angle thus formed 
he teaches his bull pups to chew each other. He calls 
it his Corn L College. 



Artist — I painted this picture, sir, to keep the wolf 
from the door. 

Dealer — Well, I'd advise you to hang it on the knob, 
where the wolf can see it.— Tit-Bits. 



Now come the days when maidens all, 

Without a law to hinder, 
Drag stacks of red leaves from the woods 

To throw them out the winder. 



A MOUNTAIN LION HUNT BY NIGHT 

Robert Meade Smith, M.D. 



T 



'HERE IS a 

great dif- 
ference 
of opinion as 
to whether 
the animal 
known in the 
West as a 
mountain 
lion, will at- 
tack man, 
even when 
cornered. I 
heard one 
man say that he had killed, without 




every night, a lion would jump this 
fence, kill a goat and then, with tin- 
goat in his mouth, again clear the 
stockade. The power of the cou 
is enormous. 1 onc^ tracked • 
through the snow nearly a mile from 
where he had killed a goat, to a de- 
serted tunnel, where he had partly 
devoured and then abandoned the 
carcass; yet he had carried it all that 
distance with only an occasional mark 
to show where a leg had dragged or 
a little fleece been left on the under- 
brush. Perhaps, he carried it on his 
back, as I saw a Chesapeake Bay 



much of a fight, a lioness and three dog carry a wild goose I had killed 

cubs, with a club, when brought to bay while shooting in Arkansas, and as a 

by a small dog; but as this man had a fox is said to carry his prey. 

silver mine which*he valued at$250,- Mountain lions are rarely seen in 

000, and which his '"friendship" for daytime, for then they lie hidden in 

me (I had known him a week) in- the rocks; but, like the rest of the cat 



duced him to offer to me for $10,000, 
my modesty inclines me to think 
that perhaps he was not strictly reli- 
able. Nevertheless, the general 



tribe, they do most of their hunting 
at night. That they do not hunt 
solely in the dark is shown by the 
incident mentioned above; for every 



opinion in Arizona and New Mexico, night the herd was rounded up and 

where I have spent considerable time driven into the corral, a mile or two 

in hunting, is that the mountain lion, from where I had found unmistak- 

in these parts at any rate, is a cow- able evidence that one had been 

ardly brute that may be treed by the killed and carried off. Either 

smallest barking cur, and that will must have been left out over night. 

not make much of a fight even when which is not probable, or it was killed 

"peace with honor" is impossible, in the daytime. It was certain, how - 

I know that in the Northwestern ever, that their pernicious activity 

states and territories a different opin- was mainly exercised by night, so we 

ion prevails, and have heard many decided to try and turn the hunters 

stories of lions attacking people, even into the hunted that evening with the 

in broad daylight. Of my own ex- aid of five hounds. 



penence, I know that a mountain 
lion may have a beautiful drop on a 
man and not take advantage of it. 

A few years ago, I was hunting in 
Southwestern New Mexico, making 
head-quarters at a little mining camp 
called Kingston, and was asked by a 
ranchman, living about three miles 
from town, to come out and help him 
kill a mountain lion which was kill- 
ing his Angora goats. Every even- 
ing the goats were driven into a cor- 
ral, with a solid stockade around it 
at least six feet high; yet, nearly 



I rode out to the ranch at about 
8 o'clock in the evening, in the 
early part of July, and found I)a\is 
waiting for me, struggling t<> resti 

his dogs. I had barely time to tie up 
my horse before the dogs, which lie 
had let loose when I arrn 
ascent and w ere off in lull cry. Talk 
about riding to hounds! 1 hough we 
missed tin' view ol the on e, a en 
country ride is tame compared I 
run up a steep mountain gulch g.OOO 
feet in the air. in midnight darkne 
stumbling, si tig and fallii 



231 



232 



RECREATION. 



with the deep bay of the hounds, some- 
times apparently right in front of us, 
at other times scarcely audible; never 
knowing what minute we would be 
right in the middle of the hunt. The 
dogs make so much better time than 
does the lion when running up hill- 
that they soon close in on him. when 
he turns down the gulch until he has 
gained on them, then up again, 
and so on until finally he is treed. 

In about 15 minutes we had our 
lion up a tree, and as we rushed up 
the hill I saw a dark shape against 
the sky line, crawling down the in- 
clined trunk of the tree. I was 
afraid to shoot, as the mountaineer 
and dogs were both in front of me, 
hidden in the darkness. In an in- 
stant^ we heard the game jump 
to the ground and make off, followed 
by the dogs. Davis fired at one of 
the lions and shouted: " I've missed 
him." This certainly looked as if the 
woods were full of them. 

Another wild chase, another or 
perhaps one of the same lions treed, 
another rush to where the angry bark 
of the dogs told us they had the 
game ; but before we could reach them 
we again heard the lion jump to the 
ground and crash off through the un- 
derbrush, followed by the dogs. By 
this time, I was pretty weH winded, 
and although the dogs again took up 
the trail and soon had him again 
treed, we were both slow in reaching 
the spot, only to hear again the dis- 
couraging " thump " as the lion took 
to the ground. 

I was then complely tuckered out, 
and sat down under a leaning tree 
that the lion had just left, to wait 
while Davis went off after the dogs. 
In a few minutes, one old dog came 
back to me, and in a great state of 
excitement began again to bark up 
the tree, jumping and attempting 
to climb the trunk, which grew at 
an angle with the steep bank of the 
ravine. Just then Davis came back 
for me. I moved higher up the 
bank to meet him. We both sat 
down to rest, never dreaminr that 
there could be another lion ni the 
tree under which 1 had been sitting 



so unconcernedly for the past 10 
minutes. 

The night was pitch dark down in 
this timbered gulch, but from our 
new position, the top of the tree 
showed faintly against the star- lit 
sky, and together we exclaimed: 
"There's another," prompted as 
much by hearing as by sight. I told 
Davis to light a match and as it flared 
up there, sure enough, was another 
lion, slowly crawling out on a hori- 
zontal limb directly over and not 
10 feet above where I had been sit- 
ting. I was armed with a 10-bore 
Greener hammerless, and without 
rising or aiming, for which there was 
no time, fired from the hip, and had 
the good luck to put a load of buck- 
shot through the big cat's heart. 
Davis said he saw the shot drive 
him heels over head off the bough, 
and we both heard him crashing, 
rolling, and tumbling down the 
mountain side, through the under- 
brush. 

All the other dogs, which appar- 
ently had been unable to find the 
trail of the other lion, at the sound of 
the shot came rushing over. We were 
not slow in getting down the hill- 
side. About 50 yards up the other 
bank of the gulch we found the pack 
chewing and tugging at the lion, 
which was stone dead, with a hole 
completely through the body just 
back of the shoulder. We drove 
off the dogs before they had dam- 
aged the hide, lit a fire and proceeded 
to skin what proved to be a young 
lioness, heavy with cub. 

It was difficult to get enough light 
without scorching ourselves, and we 
were both so tired that we left 
her and started for home. I had 
only recently left a sick bed, and the 
next day was unable to move, so my 
wife, who has as keen an interest in 
sport as myself, with one of my sons, 
went on horseback to Davis' ranch 
and with him to the scene of my good 
luck. After Davis had completed 
the job of skinning, my wife, much to 
her broncho's disgust, brought the 
head and hide home with her. I 
boiled and cleaned the head, salted 



A MOUNTAIN LION HUNT BY NIGHT 



233 




"THEY NOW DECORATE MY STUDY. 

the skin and brought them to Colo- home from the taxidermisl it had 

rado Springs, where I am now living, black fox ears! This astonishing 

had them mounted and they metamorphosis was, however, 

now decorate my study. Although plained, when I learned there w 

I had been particularly careful to see bounty of $10 a pair, for mountain 

that the head, which I skinned out lions' ears, 
myself, was perfect, when it came 



'Mid all the truths evolved by man 

At inspiration's call, 
None seems more pat at present than, 

" Pride goeth before a fall." 

The turkey gobbler which we 

With proud head elevated. 

Soon by the gleaming ax must I i 

De ed. 

cap tat 

i 



TROUTING ON CLARK'S FORK 



Gen. F. W. Benteen, U. S. A. 



Clark's Fork, of the Yellowstone 
River, is sired by perpetual 
snow, which, awakened to life by 
the genial rays of the sun, goes dash- 
ing and crashing through the can- 
yon whose crowning faces are tinted 
with all the hues of the rainbow. 
Rising south of the Yellowstone 
Park, this river, laboring among 
great crags, some of which are 
cathedral-like in size and grandeur, 
prances and roars through some ioo 
miles of space to pour its snowy 
waters into those of the Yellow- 
stone. 

On Clark's Fork, during a portion 
of the summer of 1877, I enjoyed 
such trout-fishing as I know I shall 
never again see. On an afternoon 
in August, having the permission of 
the commanding officer to leave 
camp, my orderly and myself, well 
mounted — the orderly leading a 
pack-mule equipped with immense 
canvas panniers of my own construc- 
tion — went a mile or two up-stream 
for trout. I should mention that six 
troops of the Seventh U. S. Cavalry, 



of which organization I was then a 
captain, was in that section of coun- 
try to assist General Howard in 
" rounding up " the Nez Perce Indi- 
ans, who were supposed to be in that 
vicinity. I had tired of my hexago- 
nal bamboo rod, and my fly-book 
being almost in tatters, I had pro- 
vided myself with a long birch pole 
from the mountains, to which was 
attached a strong silk line, without 
leader, and two large-sized Limerick 
hooks, about three feet apart. These 
hooks I baited with the yellow- and 
red-winged grasshoppers, with which 
we had abundantly provided our- 
selves. 

On reaching a suitable place I dis- 
mounted, and fording the river to a 
large boulder, I commenced making 
my casts. Such luck as I had in in- 
veigling the trout from their hiding- 
places, was probably never excelled, 
for, without going a quarter of a mile 
from that spot, I had landed all that 
the panniers would hold, and had a 
string of trout on each side of the 
mule's neck besides, so as to materi- 




A GLIMPSE OF CLARK S FORK, BELOW THE CANYON. 

234 



TROUTING ON CLARK'S FORK. 






ally interfere with his locomotion ; 
yet all fish of one pound or less, were 
returned to the water, and given a 
chance to grow larger. 

The orderly was kept busy on the 
bank, taking the fish from the 
hooks. Indeed, he couldn't begin 
to keep up with me. 

This was surely potting fish ; but 
then, I confess that was what I was 
after. Having secured a ten-gallon 
syrup keg, I sent it, filled with trout, 
to Fort Lincoln, Dakota, as such fish 
are not indigenous to that region. 

On returning to camp, I reported to 
the commanding officer, inviting him 
to have the cook of his mess come 
and help himself to what fish they 
might want for supper and breakfast. 
That the " C. O." and the other offi- 
cers were surprised at the result of 
my trip, and the size and beauty of 
the fish, is not strange, for a more 
beautiful string has seldom, if ever, 
been taken anywhere on hook and 
line. 

The commanding officer was also 
an enthusiastic angler, and asked 
me to show him, on the next day, 
how such trout fishing was done. 
We went and I showed him the fish 



in the pools, eddies and cascades, and 
though he fished diligently and 
tiently, he never caught a single 
trout. He was not willing to 
wet, and trout fishing and dry 
ing I never found to be compatible-. 
As he did not condescend to I 
the rushing torrent on foot, he never 
learned the trick of catching these 
big fellows. 

A few days more, and our scouts 
had located the NezPerces, So, away 
we went across che range, and up the 
"Stinking Water." then* tin, 

over the range; but "Lo" was not 
waiting for 'us. We got his trail, 
kept on, and the first thing we knew, 
were marching into General How 
ard's camp. 

Bright and early next morning, 
we were in the saddle, and am 
march of 45 miles, we can- lit up 
with the NezPerces, on ( \m\ mil 'n 
Montana, and had a lively bins!] 
with them. 

When we went through that s< 
tion of country a month orso before, 
the plains were covered with bison, 
but the Nez Perces had driven them 
out, for not even was there .111 old 
bull in sight. 



WILLIAM G. CHAPMAN. 



This picture represents the famous artist, 
William G. Chapman, shooting larks just 
outside of Rome. The way that sport (?) is 
conducted there is to capture a small owl, 




tie him to the end of a pole and set him up 
in the field. The larks gather about to fight 
him and the would-be sportsman shoots 



them. Mr. Chapman may not be a 
man, in our sense of the term, but he 
great artist. He painted " I he Mai 
Pocahontas" which hangs in the rotund 
the capitol at Washington, and many other 
well-known pieces. 

Belle — See here, Harry, 

would teach me to ride mj wheel, and 
have given me only one lesson. 

Harry — That's all right ; I'vel 
derstudy who hasn't any \\ lii>k < 
doesn't mind being kicked. 



There was a man in our tow 

Who wasn't verj w 
I [e bought his w ife a bi< 

To give h< r . ad surpi 

' he got the 
And anguish madi 
Thai wif< 
But always on that w b< 



DUCKING OFF MACHIPONGO. 



W. J. BOGERT. 



"S' 



ay, old man, there's no use 
waiting any longer or mak- 
ing further excuses. Just 
get yourself together and meet me 
Saturday or Sunday. I shall start 
Wednesday night, "and shall expect 
you. 

So spoke my old friend, Doctor 
Carman, a " tooth-plugger," I call 
him, who has a handsome office in 
the Mutual Reserve Building, two 
blocks above my office. Although I 
have seemingly spoken irreverently 
of him, amore gentle man, in his pro- 
fession, never touched a bicuspid 
(I think that's his favorite name for 
every ivory ot mine he has dallied 
with), and you would wonder how 
such a man could ever have the heart 
to shoot a bird. But walk into the 
doctor's office any day, as he is in the 
act of pulling a tooth— when he has 
it half out, for that matter — and say, 
" Doctor, we have just ten minutes to 
get to the ferry ; bring your gun; " 
and as he reaches around behind his 
partition for it, he will say to the pa- 
tient, " Come next week and I'll finish 
pulling it out and will clean all your 
others for nothing. I must go." 

I would have gone with the doctor 
on Wednesday, but as it was Thanks- 
giving day and as I preferred be- 
ing with my family, I decided to 
join him later. I took the 8.00 p. m. 
Pennsylvania train to Machipongo, 
Va., where I was "put off" at the 
unseemly hour of 5.20 the following 
morning. I suppose you will say, 
"Where's Machipongo?" I don't 
wonder that you ask, for I had often 
passed through it on my way to 
Old Point and Norfolk, but never 
until the doctor told me had I heard 
of the place. It is 12 miles north 
of Cape Charles, on the N. Y., P. and 
N. R. R. 

Really, if you were to be suddenly 
transported there, with your eyes 
shut, you might imagine yourself in 
the Island of Juan Fernandez, for 



there is hardly a habitation in sight 
of the station. There is a little 
country store, where you can get rub- 
ber boots if you are willing to take 
the size the dealer keeps, but beyond 
these, I saw nothing I wanted. 

When I got off the train it was 
still dark, and I concluded no one 
had come for me, when suddenly I 




YOU HIDE YOURSELF AND YOUR BOAT IN 
THE BLIND. 

made out a road-cart, and there was 
"Will," holding a horse that would 
have stood anywhere without hold- 
ing. 

We were mutually glad at our 
meeting, and I was soon perched on 
the seat beside Will, pulling on my 
pipe. " How's Doc?" was my first 
question. 

" O! he's well. I came in yesterday 
with a big lot of birds that he had 
killed, and I expressed them to your 
office. Did you get them all right? 

I explained that they could not 
get to my office until Monday, and 
asked, "What uck?" Will said 



236 



DUCKING OFF MACHIPONGO. 






it had been fair, and that much 
better shooting was anticipated. So 
we jogged along and talked about 
what had happened since my last 
visit, in the spring. After a two-mile 
ride we reached Captain Miles' house, 
which is on, or near, a little creek 
that runs into Hog Island Bay. 

Shall I describe the captain's 
house? Well, I could not do that if 
I would, but from the moment you 
arrive until you leave, you never 
need expect to see or eat anything 
you have ever seen or eaten before, 
for they live and cook so differently 
from all other people. Yet you 
don't mind that, for the salt air 
braces you up, and you have nothing 
to do but sleep from dark until near 
daylight, when you get up to break- 
fast, and you would eat boot-legs, if 
they were fried in the same amount 
of grease as the other food is. 

After breakfast, I was taken out in a 
flat-bottomed sailboat, called a bat- 
teau, some three miles, to where the 
sloop was anchored, on which my 
friend, the doctor, was living. Cap- 
tain Miles and the cook (a good-na- 
tured darkey, named Jim), were with 
him. I had worn my store clothes, 
for the doctor, as an extra induce- 
ment, had said, " Bring nothing; I 
will have everything." And he had. 
So you may imagine my appearance 
as I sat there, that cold morning, 
with the skirt of my long overcoat 
turned up about me for fear of getting 
it soiled in the dirty, old boat. It 
was the first time I had ever been in 
it, "dressed up," and I trust it will 
be the last. 

After a while we saw a puff of 
smoke half a mile off, and heard 
a report. Will said, " That's some 
one in our blind." Then I saw a 
second shot and a splash. That 
meant a dead bird, and my blood, 
which, up to that moment, had 
been stagnant, began coursing 
through my veins. In a moment, I 
saw a boat push out from the blind, 
and the familiar figures of the doctor 
and Jim appeared, paddling for dear 
life. They were after a cripple which 
was swimming for its dear life. 




"A CRACK ABOUT FIFTI'.I'.N INCHES W1D1 IN 
WHICH YOU CKAW L TO SLE1 

Soon I came upon them, and i 
changing places with Jim, shed 
my overcoat, for doctor had the 
other with him. We sent Jim with 
the batteau to the sloop, and there, 
amid some 40 of the most pel 
decoys I ever saw, we spent two 
hours, when dinner-time came, and 
we were taken to the sloop. 

Shall I describe her': Well, -1 
an eight-ton boat with a cabin about 
four by five feet. Beneath the d< 
all around, is a crack, about 1; 
inches wide, into which you crawl to 
sleep — "perchance, to dream." I 
know I did. I had .1 n ;htn 
caused "by an overdose ol bacon. I 
should have known better than 
so heartily the first day, but didn't. 
I dreamed I had been buncd alive. 
When I awoke-. I found I must - rawl 
out of my " berth " to turn 0\ 
and so I slept every night. B 
soon gets used to anythii I he 

doctor, who had tried all th< 
gave me the one said t< tain 

feathers, generously ta 
himself with but three, and tl. 
had all worked down to th 

Thus Car I have told you onl] 



238 



RECREATION. 



Ate 



4i^ ^C 




"WHEN THE BIRDS COME IN. 

hardships and privations. I have 
kept the most toothsome things to 
the last, as we do in case of a good 
dinner. Every day we got from 10 
to 20 birds to each gun. They 
were brant, black ducks, coots, shell- 
drakes, broad-bills, hairy-heads, and 
dippers, elsewhere called butter 
balls. We saw a number of geese, 
but they kept out of range. We 
were a month too early for them. 
I think we saw a hundred thousand 
brant, or black ducks, in the three 
days I was there. They would float 
and feed not over a mile from us, but 
as the weather was fine, they kept 
in immense flocks and would seldom 
come to stool. In stormy weather 
they scatter and are more easily at- 
tracted by decoys. 

The natives know the habits of 
these birds and build blinds on their 
feeding grounds. These are simply 
brush stuck in the mud, over which 
the depth of water varies from a foot 
to four feet, according to tide. After 



putting out your decoys, you hide 
your boat and yourself in the blind. 
Of course, it isn't like shooting a big 
moose, with a side as broad as a barn 
door; but it's exciting, all the same, 
when you see a bunch of brant or 
black ducks coming and fall to won- 
dering whether they will come within 
range. How your heart does thump 
as they settle down among your de- 
coys! If they are still a moment, it is 
hard to tell the real birds from the 
counterfeits, especially in twilight. 

If I hadn't harmed a feather, I 
would have relt repaid for my trip. 
I reaped great benefit from those 
few days and nights on the salt 
marshes. The evenings were simply 
delightful. As our sloop lay at an- 
chor in the bay, I would go on deck, 
and with nothing in sight but the 
stars, Cape Charles and Hog Island 
lights I felt entranced. The quack- 
ing and chattering of countless 
birds of varying abilities was rare 
music, and I would spend hours im- 
agining how many I would get on 
the morrow. 

The sloop I speak of so kindly is 
used by Captain Miles, at this season, 
merely to live on, as the shooting 
grounds are too far from his house 
to sail to and from every day. He 
carried on board about 150 decoys, 
which require a great deal of room. 
We always anchor about a mile from 
the shooting grounds, and use a dif- 
ferent blind everyday. In the proper 
season the geese and brant gi'/e 
fine sport. For these many shooters 
use an eight-bore gun, as a smaller 
will not always do the work. If you 
write Captain R. E. Miles, Machi- 
pongo, Va., he will tell you, honestly 
whether to come or not, for he prides 
himself on his truthfulness, and for 
which I can vouch. In the spring, 
excellent sport may be had there in 
the way of snipe-shooting and drum- 
fishing, about which, I would be 
pleased to tell you later. 



Recreation arrived to-day, and 1 have been di- 
gesting it from cover to cover. It is without doubt 
the most newsy sportsmen's monthly published, and 
you deserve great credit for it. 

Charles R. Palmer, M- D., 

West Chester, Pa. 







WJIE IiflST 

.. .. 0F JFflE ^ZTKCg. 



Dr. Edward J. Tucker. 



CHAPTER IX. 

RECONCILIATION. 

Gently releasing herself, Jessie 
said : "Come, Allen, you must take 
dinner with us to-day ; we expect 
your father and brother, and at our 
board there must be a reconciliation." 

I stopped short, and felt a dark 
frown gathering over my face. Jessie 
gazed at me a moment and said, 
" Allen, you surprised me into be- 
traying my sentiments. I do love 
you, dear, so be guided by one who 
will be jealous of your most sensitive 
feelings, and whose interests are now 
my own. I have made my choice 
among men and you will never have 
cause to be jealous." 

" Very well, darling," I answered; 
" I will be guided by you." 

On entering the little room in Mr. 
Sheldon's house, designated the par- 
lor, I found my father, Steve and Mr. 
Sheldon. They gazed on me in as- 
tonishment, as I stood on the thres- 
hold, undecided whether to advance 
or retreat. A gentle pressure of a 
small hand reassured me. I clung 
to the hand and advanced into the 



room, approaching Mr. Sheldon, and 
said: 

" Some months ago, Mr. Sheldon, 
you bade me consider myself as an 
adopted son. I have misund< 
myself and have misjudged \ 
daughter Jessie, to whom I h 
just declared my love. She has 
knowleged a tender regard for me, 
and you know how ardently I loved 
her even before I knew her name. 
You are aware of the agony I sufl 
ed after having injured her, through 
my boyish folly . Since you i 
me as an adopted son, will you not 
accept i iu- as a son- in law, and give me 
this precious girl ':" 

Surprise, consternation, and inde- 
cison chased each other 
the pastor's venerable features as he 
essayed to speak, and as the t< 
welled from his eyes and ran down 
his cheeks, Jessie fell on her kl 
and kissing his hands, whisper* 

" I love Allen. . and he Will 

take care of thy Jessie when I 
follows my dear mother. Allen and 
I understand each other, and we Will 
be as happy as werethee and moth< 



239 



240 



RECREATION. 



A trembling hand was tenderly laid 
on the small head, and the other 
beckoned to me. I drew near, he took 
my hand and said: 

" My days are almost spent, Allen, 
and were it the Lord's will to call me 
this night, I would be ready to go if 
this dear child had found a protector; 
but I tear to place her hand in one 
whose owner yields to ungovernable 
fits of passion, and who is at enmity 
with his father and brother. If this 
be so, what guarantee have I thou 
wilt not, tor some imaginary slight or 
offence, leave the sweet being at my 
knee?" 

A hot answer rose to my lips, but 
when I turned and saw Jessie's eyes 
fastened on me, I bent and kissed the 
upturned face. Then turning, I 
walked over to where my father sat, 

"Father," I began; "it is possible I 
may have dealt harshly with you and 
my brother, for I have misunderstood 
Jessie and myself, though I cannot 
tell why you left me, or what cause of 
complaint you have against me." 

" None, Allen, none," interrupted 
my father ; "Steve made me leave, 
but I wish to go back to the old farm 
if you will let me." 

" Steve," I rejoined, turning to my 
brother, " I partly understand your 
feelings, but the battle has been 
fought and won, though the "contest 
has been an unfair one. Are you 
willing to start anew ? I do not de- 
sire to work as a farmer, and have 
about concluded to lease the farm to 
Mr. Yost. I would prefer to let you 
have it on the same terms Mr. Yost 
offers." 

" I will think it over," responded 
my brother, "but in any case I would 
prefer buying it." 

" It is not for sale," I replied cold- 
ly, for I knew he wanted it for some- 
thing else than farming, though I 
could not imagine what else the land 
was good for. 

"Well, since father is anxious to 
go back to the old place, I will see 
you to-morrow, arrange for a lease 
and advance you sufficient to enable 
you to pursue your medical studies." 

" Such being the case," I continu- 



ed, turning to the venerable pastor, 
" I will commence my studies to- 
morrow in Doctor Sprague,s office, 
and enter college in the fall. I have 
not felt so at peace with the world 
for many months, and all I now de- 
sire is your consent to my engage- 
ment to your daughter." 

"Jessie's happiness has been my 
life study. If she feels her faith and 
trust is not misplaced, I bow to her 
judgment, but I fear thy temper." 

"Jessie will not regret her choice 
on account of an infirmity I had not 
even suspected until I was being 
wronged. I mean to bury the past 
and will never allude to it again." 

"Jessie," I said, taking the girl by 
the hand, " my father desires to give 
you his blessing." I then led her to 
my father, who kissed and blessed 
her. Steve held out a trembling 
hand, and his face turned paler than 
ever I had seen it before. I knew 
what it must have cost him to go 
through the ordeal of seeing me pub- 
licly taking possession of the girl he 
would have shed his heart's blood to 
have won. I longed to offer him 
consolation, but felt it would have 
been like mockery. I pitied him in 
my heart and offered him my hand. 
His face could not have turned paler, 
but in the uncertain light of the little 
parlor, it seemed to take on a vivid 
green as he turned his back on me. 

Suddenly I felt my hand clasped, 
and Jessie, seizing one of Steve's, 
cried: 

" You brothers have been at enmity 
long enough! If I have been the 
unhappy cause, I am sorry I ever 
came into either of your lives. I 
have been compelled to make a 
choice, and my heart led me to Al- 
len; but it would be foolish and 
wicked for you to continue in the path 
of strife you have trod. Allen has 
rightly offered you his hand, as he 
can afford to make the first advance; 
you will make me very miserable if 
you refuse it." 

Steve looked at the troubled face 
before him and replied: 

" For your sake, I will accept the 
proffered reconciliation, and in time 



GAUTEMOTZIN: THE LAST OF THE AZTECS, 



-M i 



I may be able to look upon Allen 
with a brotherly eye. I am very 
unhappy now, and beg you will allow 
me to leave this house. I will call 
on Allen to-morrow." 

Jessie inclined her head. Steve 
bowed to the rest and departed. The 
remainder of the day was the most 
delightful of my life. I have suffered 
much during my life, and in the words 
of the old song, can truly say : 

" I have journeyed o'er the deep, 

I have crossed the desert wild ; 
I have seen the storm arise, 

Like a giant in my path. 
Every danger I have known 

That a reckless life can lead, 
Yet her presence is not flown, 

Her bright smile haunts me still." 

That one day proves I have not 
lived in vain. I loved Jessie fer- 
vently, and as I sat in the little par- 
lor that sunny afternoon admiring 
her classic features, I said : 

" Jessie, dearest, J am a rough 
country boy and do not deserve the 
rich treasure that has fallen to my 
lot." 

" Allen," she replied, " the rarest 
jewel was but a rough stone until the 
edges were smoothed down and it re- 
ceived a polish. That you will get 
when you are brought in contact with 
your fellow students." 

" Nevertheless I am forcibly re- 
minded of the beautiful lines of the 
poet." 

" What are they, love ?' 

" I remember once how I, an idle boy, 

Used fondly stray beside a lovely stream, 
On whose wild banks grew flowers that gave 
me joy, 
And set me dreaming some sweet dream. 
One bank was low and carpeted with green, 
The other high and steep — you could not 
climb. 
To climb it, though, was my ambition ; still, 
alas ! 



ss. 



I could not reach that height that 
sublime ; 
For on this bank their grew a lovely flower, 

\\ Inch I so long, s<> tried to oik e pos 
Twas lor this 1 sought to climb, ah, man 
an hour, 

But failure was my lot, I must conf< 
It was the fairest flower that blossomea 
there — 
Its beauty far more rich than all the n 
Its sweet perfume was wafted on tin 
To own it, I thought my life wrere b 

'Tis thus I think of thee, my lady fair 
How humble is my place, how hizh art 
thou ! 
My loving thee, and almost to despair, 
My struggling but to climb where thou 
art now. 
For years I've toiled to gain that m 
boon, 
The fame and richness that would equal 
thine so great; 
And as I grasp them,ah! they fade too 8 
And so I love you in my humble St 

But all my struggles have availed me naught; 

The vision lades, and from my dream I 
wake, 
Full many a sorrow in my heart is fraught, 

And all, sweet lady, lor thy gentle Sail 
And still, fair lady, thou art' like my flower, 

So high upon the bank beside the stream ; 
And as I dream of thee through every hour, 

I find it all must be an empty dream. 

But my heart spoke when lips wished not to 
speak, 
May Heaven send you blesi from 

above, 
May tears ne'er stain tip 

Still, lady, let me say I chide the fate 
That made our lives SO far so wide a: 
My humble lot, how can I help but i 
Since it has stole the jewel of my he. 

Ah ! well ! r tis life to love and lose, I k 
But may you never know that bitter dp 
To love the sweetest flower that '.nth 
could grow, 
While it so high above beyond tin- stream." 

" Allen, your love has had a difl 
ent termination from that of the p< 
Your dream is realized." 

" Not yet, darling, but soon will 
will it not:" 

"Surely," she answered sweetly. 



(to BE CONTINUED. ) 



SHE WAS LEARNING. 

Mary had a little wheel 
'Twas anything but slow, 

And everywhere that cycle went 
Poor Mary had to 

— Louisville Courier- Journal* 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 




THE DAKOTA WAY. 

Urichsville, O. 
Editor Recreation: 

Thinking you might be interested in our 
party's recent hunting trip to South Dakota, 
I will endeavor to give you some idea of our 
experiences. Mr. O. L. Peter and I were 
there a week before the main body of our 
party came to Waubay. Mr. Peter not be- 
ing very well, we only made a few trips over 
the prairies in search of chickens, of which 
Mr. P. shot several each trip. Our main 
party, composed of the following gentlemen, 
reached Waubay on Saturday : Jas. L. Ma- 
son, Pittsburg, Pa.; James L. Reynolds, 
Steubenville, O.; L. B. Roney and C. M. 
Kline, Dennison, O.; S. W. Walters and 
Edward Campbell, of Gnadenhiitten, O., 
and Jesse Cochran, of Columbus, O. 

We did our first shooting on Tuesday, 
killing only a few chickens, a hawk and two 
jack rabbits. On Wednesday, the largest 
score was made, 65 chickens, for a party, 
with 12 guns; Mr. Campbell making the 
best record — 16 chickens. 

Campbell, Roney, Cutting and I, were in 
one wagon, and, while driving along by a 
wheat field, a chicken jumped up behind us, 
when L. B. Roney saw it. Breaking his gun, 
he put in two shells, and twisting around to 
the left, fired the right barrel, and winged 
the bird. He jumped out, laid down his gun, 
and ran to get this bird, when another rose 
to his right 25 feet away; he ran back and 
picking up his gun, fired the left barrel, and 
winged this bird also. He got both, when 
another rose about 50 feet away, and was 
shot by Campbell, who had jumped out of 
the wagon at the second shot. We imme- 
diately christened Roney, " Bogardus Lon." 
Ordinarily Roney would miss 8 birds out of 10. 



On Sept. 5, we went to Pickerel Lake, 17 
miles N. E. of Waubay, and went into camp 
for a few days' hunting and fishing. We 
had scarcely got our tents up, and in order 
when it began to rain. This soon turned to 
hail, about the size of peas. The storm con- 
tinued, and the hail grew larger and larger, 
until we became alarmed, lest we be driven 
into the ground, tents and all. The largest 
hailstones, after lying half an hour, meas- 
ured 12 inches in circumference; and fell so 
thick that the lake in front of our tents was 
thrashed in a seething mass of watery mist. 
When the hail storm ended, a wave of suf- 
focating, hot air rushed after the storm, re- 
sulting in the formation of a cyclone, which, 
when we first saw it, seemed to be coming 
directly towards us. After a quick run to 
a convenient dugout, we were relieved to see 
that the funnel-shaped cloud had turned and 
gone east. We watched it for about an hour 
before it finally disappeared from view. We 
later heard that it went 62 miles over into 
Minnesota, where it blew down a few houses, 
and killed two children. 

The trip, as far as hunting and fishing was 
concerned, was disappointing; but, as most 
of us had never been in the Far West, we en- 
joyed the climate, scenery, and the hospital- 
ity of the people at Waubay. We had a 
splendid jack-rabbit chase, with two large 
greyhounds. One rabbit got away, but the 
other was caught. It was by all odds the 
funniest experience of our trip. 

En route home we caught a glimpse of 
the dells of the Wisconsin, at Kilbourne 
City. The most interesting part of our trip, 
however, was from Minneapolis to Lacrosse, 
along the Mississippi, past Lake Pepin, and 
the great cathedral - like rocks at Red 
Wing, Winona, etc. There are many pic- 
turesque lakes in Wisconsin, along the C. M. 
& S. P. R. R., some of which are near Mil- 
waukee. 

All my friends who have seen Recrea- 
tion are delighted with it, and most of them 
will subscribe. Mr. O. L. Peters, one of our 
Dakota hunters, will get up a club soon. He 
will try for a rifle, to be given to his little 
daughter, who wants to be a hunter, and to 
join her father in his trips hereafter. 

We expect to catch some muscallonge and 
jack salmon in our river (Tuscarrawas) near 
here, before grim winter catches us. Bass 
are being caught freely. The other day a 
fisherman returning to town by rowboat, saw 
a duck disappear under water, and it never 
came up. He says some big fish caught it. 
I have heard of pike doing such tricks, and 
think this must have been either a pike or a 
muscallonge. We are going to try and 
catch it, whatever it is. Will report our suc- 
cess. R. F. Kern. 



242 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



243 



THE HUMBUG OF THE YEAR. 

From The Great Divide. 

Frank S. Thayer, of Denver, has published 
a book called " Hoofs, Claws, and Antlers," 
the idea being to show by the pictures snap- 
shot views of wild animals of the Rocky 
Mountains in their native habits. Several 
pictures of such were procured, but not 
enough to make a book. No doubt some 
one told Mr. Thayer that, as the late Mr. 
Barnum said, the people liked to be hum- 
bugged; which, of course, in this case was 
taken seriously and followed in the most 
exact detail. 

The few genuine photographs were repro- 
duced. A Mr. McFadden, a taxidermist 
who has a collection of stuffed animals com- 
prising almost everything, from a prairie dog 
to a buffalo, was sought, and the stuffed ani- 
mals taken to the woods, on the plains, or on 
the mountain side, so as to make the sur- 
roundings as natural as life. Then the 
services of the well-known photographer, W. 
H. Jackson, were secured, and the photo- 
graphs taken. 

In order that the humbug might be com- 
plete, sample pictures and a flattering letter 
were sent to Mr. Theodore Roosevelt, with 
the request that he write the preface for the 
book. It must be said to Mr. Roosevelt's 
credit, that all the photographs were not sent, 
else his knowledge of game might have de- 
tected the fraud. The preface came, Mr. 
Thayer was delighted with it, and used it 
verbatim. The book was printed, sent to the 
journalistic critics, and received notices 
praising it to the sky. The editor of the 
Cosmopolitan Magazine was so pleased with 
the book that the pictures in it were repro- 
duced in his August number. 

The price of " Hoofs, Claws, and Antlers " 
is $3.50 for the regular edition, $5 for the 
edition de luxe, limited, but printed from 
same plates. 

If you want to see these pictures for noth- 
ing, write to W. A. Bailey, Hotel Colorado, 
Glenwood Springs, Colo., who also repro- 
duced them in a beautiful pamphlet adver- 
tising his hotel. We do not believe that so 
successful a humbug has been given to the 
public since the find of the Cardiff Giant in 
1869. 

Editor Recreation : 

The waterfowl are just arriving at this place 
from the North, and it seems we are to have 
another season's shooting ruined by the 
launch owners, unless steps are promptly 
taken to restrain them. Yesterday a launch 
was out hunting up the few birds that have 
arrived. 

It seems impossible, with the present fa- 
cilities afforded by the State, to do much 
with them. The first game warden district 
embraces the whole of Long Island, Staten 
Island, Long Island Sound, and New York 
Bay ; and while Mr. Brown, the protector, 
is an energetic man and a valuable officer, 



he cannot be in more than three pi ao 
once. Hence the launch owners have things 

their own way nearly all the tunc I am 
convinced that if sportsmen knew how una h 
mischief the launches really do they would 
be more active in reporting them. 

No one objects to the number <>f birds 
really killed from launches, as the) an- a \ er\ 
small proportion, indeed, of the total number 
of birds shot. As a matter of fad, I i 
never seen any but cripples killed and 
picked up by launchmen. What we do ob- 
ject to is the incessant chasing of b 
which can only result in driving them off 
their feeding-grounds and out of the Sound. 
We know this will be done this year, . 
has every year since the naphthas started 
in. According to my ideas, the State should 
provide the game protector with a 
launch, and keep one man to patrol the 
Sound during the ducking season. 

There was but one arrest and conviction 
last year that came to my knowledge, but on 
every good day there were from 01 
three launches chasing birds off this p 
It is practically impossible to ascertain the 
names of the boats violating the law, as the 
owners generally take care to >ver them up 
with a board or strip of canvas. This is its 
as I understand it, an additional violation. 

We would have very fair shooting hen 
only legitimate methods were practiced, and it 
seems a shame to have it ruined by the s 
ish practices of a few law-breaking boat 
owners. I can suggest no other rem* 
the one above mentioned. Possibly 8t 
of your numerous leaders can devise oth 
A. S. DOANE, Lattingtown, I.. 1. 



Editor Recreation : 

Did you ever have winter in the summer 
time? We have had a two-dayt 
storm here, and it's been quite liki 
mas — has driven the game down from the 
high ridges so we can get at them without 
walking our feet off. Everybody has yei 
now, and some have be; Billy 

I are going away on a hunt 1! find 

our cayuses. Have been out all day hunting 
them. We need them in our busm- - 
some jerked elk or venison. 

Last fall a lot of Indians came hi 
camped, and ran the deer out with U 
dogs. We have halt' an oum • 
nine, and woe to the canines ii theyconn 
fall. We will fix them all right. Billy 
there is no room for him and an) N 
in this mining district. I have a pair ol pel 
salmon trout down here in the littli 
They an- spawning now, and it 
to watch them. The mail carrier from l 
to Salmon Meadows ran into a blUl< 
Monday evening on his way over h< n 

Some ranches on South Fork 
hay in here, 2 bales to 
usual load. It sell 
rens. It should be good to 
a pound, but it isn't. 

Mark West, Wood River, Ida 



244 



RECREATION. 



Editor Recreation : 

1 have just returned from a hunting trip in 
the Shoshone Mountains, and to the head 
waters of Wind river and Green river. We 
were gone 42 days, 'here were 4 Eastern men 
in the party, none of horn had ever seen any 
game larger than a d ir. Their names and 
addresses are as follows : E. F. Sharp, 464 
Elm street, Chicago; H. P. Barrett and W. 
H. Stiles, Henderson, Ky., and E. M. Morse- 
man, Jr., Omaha, Neb. They got 5 as fine 
elk heads as ever came out of the mountain 
and 6 bear — 2 brown and 4 black. 
They killed 2 bear in one day and saw 5 
more. We could have killed more bear, but 
had run out of provisions and had to come 
home. 

There was a big bear working at one of 
our baits when we left. The party also 
killed one wild cat, one fox and one deer. 
We saw a great many deer, but did not try 
to kill them. 

If any of your readers want to know any- 
thing about this country or what kind of 
hunting we have, tell them to write to E. F. 
Sharp, 464 Elm street, Chicago and he will 
tell them all about it. W. L. Winegar, 
Egin, Fremont Co., Idaho. 

We start on our annual hunt Oct. 24 foi 
the Upper Peninsula. Kersey, Beach aHd 
Uncle Cole are still of my party, with some 
additions. I have hunted with another party 
for the past 3 years in the U. P., and have 
had great sport, our party kiWing from 14 
to 25 deer each season. I was instrumental 
in having the law changed making the open 
season in both peninsulas alike, viz., from 
Nov. 1 to 25, inclusive ; making it nec- 
essary for all deer hunters to take out a 
license from the county clerk, and requiring 
a fee of $25 for non-residents- of the 
State. This became necessary, for the rea- 
son that thousands of people from Illinois, 
Ohio, and Indiana flocked to Michigan every 
fall and slaughtered the deer. I also fixed 
the number for each person not to exceed 5 
deer in any one season. ' If this law is en- 
forced, there is no reason why deer should 
not be reasonably plenty for the next 25 
years. C.E.Foote, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Jack snipe are desultory in their flight this 
fall. They usually come with the equinoctial 
storm, in the latter part of September, but 
save a few random shots at "holdovers," 
there have been no birds bagged yet. The 
same is true of all varieties of ducks, except 
green-winged teal. 

There are now no "dead " Recreations 
on the counters of the news dealers here, 
although purchasers still experience some 
difficulty in getting the magazine promptly, 
on the first of each month. C. B. Yandell. 



The open season for quail 111 Los Angeles 
County opened Oct. 15. I am informed 
by several shooters that the birds are quite 
numerous, one man from Santa Anna say- 
ing he thought there were more quail down 
his way, at least, than he had seen in years. 
I have seen a great many. About 6 weeks 
ago I was out shooting doves, in a canyon 
some 12 miles from Los Angeles, and saw 
dozens of quail, especially young ones, just 
beginning to fly ; and on Sunday, Sep. 29, 
while taking a drive through Elysian Park, 
in this city, I counted 15 full-grown birds in 
one bevy. They were within 25 feet of the 
road, and scooted off on a run through the 
bushes as I drove along. How my trigger 
finger did itch ! 

E. A. Brininstool, Los Angeles, Cal. 



One evening recently, while our front 
door was open, a small owl took advantage 
of the opportunity to make our acquaintance. 
He came in with a rush, landed in a lump 
on my partner's head, caromed on the lamp, 
and wound, up in a ball, on some "Tangle- 
foot " fly-paper. This latter showed more 
affection for him than did either of the two 
previous objects ; in fact, it did not seem to 
like the idea of parting with him at all. 

After a little trouble, however, I, acting as 
attorney, managed to secure a divorce, and 
we now have " Horace," as we have named 
him, as a star boarder in our household. He 
really fell into good hands, for he does not 
have to work for a living. Our mousetrap 
is in commission, and provides him with 
three " squares" a day. 

A. S. Doane, Lattingtown, L. I. 

Why don't those Indian lovers back East 
get the Government to buy up the deserted 
farms of New England and take their red 
pets back there, where they could enjoy their 
company? No one in the West would ob- 
ject. Those farms would make boss reser- 
vations. Then the Indians could hunt the 
fierce woodchuck and chipmunk that so de- 
vastate Brother Jonathan's corn patch. 

A band of Nez Perces rode past here this 
morning. One of the bucks told me they 
were going over on the south fork of the 
Salmon River to hunt sheep and elk. This 
in the face of the fact that Uncle Sam re- 
cently paid them $640,000. Idaho laws say 
no elk, moose or sheep for us poor white 
trash until 1897. 

M. W. Miner, Warrens, Idaho. 



Salmon trolling is still good on the Sound, 
and he is a poor fisherman who cannot land 
at least three beauties in a morning's troll, 
varying from 5 to 25 pounds. 



New Haven, Conn. 
Editor Recreation, 

I have received the Davenport rifle which 
you sent me for the 10 subscriptions, and 
am very much pleased with it. 1 thank you 
kindly for it, and will do all I can in get- 
ting other subscribers. 

H. G. Parker. 



Subscribe for Recreation, $i a year. 
Vou will find it a good investment. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



245 



In almost every number of Recreation 
I see letters from people I know of, or de- 
scriptions of localities with which I am fa- 
miliar. Thus, the tree spoken of in the Sep- 
tember number, in Canadian notes, can be 
seen from my home, in Berlin. Although 
apparently one tree, the dark green foliage 
of the oak is easily discernible from the 
lighter green of the elm. 

About nine or ten miles from Berlin, on 
Grand River, near Conestoga, are two large 
elms, some ten feet apart, that are joined by 
a limb about six inches in diameter. Except 
for the difference in size at the ends, one can 
scarcely tell from which tree the branch 
grew. There are no small limbs growing 
on it. Austin T. Schantz, 

Morton Park, 111. 



A deer came down to camp this evening 
and was making acquaintance with our 
horses. Louis took a shot at it and made a 
clean miss. Maybe we won't make him tired 
over it. This is a game country, all right. 
Have found an elk range 5 miles from 
here. We are camped on Secesh Creek, 
14 miles from Warrens. Are going over on 
Salmon as soon as you send me that rifle. A 
man told me this morning that while coming 
up Big Creek, in the Chamberlain Basin., 
Tuesday, he saw 5 grizzlies. He was afoot, 
alone and had no gun; said he didn't want 
any more of that country. That's the place 
I'm saving for you and Bogert. 

H. M. Staver, Warrens, Idaho. 



Recreation for July contains a very 
good cut of old Fort Union, which stood on 
the right bank of the Missouri, going up 
stream, a short distance above the mouth of 
the Yellowstone. The fort was on a little 
flat near the cut bank of the river and near 
a ravine. In 1870 the stone chimneys and 
some ruins alone remained. The hostile 
Sioux haunted those "diggin's" for several 
years after, but I think they got as good as 
they sent. 

I like Recreation. It is fresh, and 
smacks of the mountains and prairies. I 
inclose a dollar for subscription. 

Luther S. Kelly, (" Yellowstone Kelly"), 
Governor's Island, N. Y. 



Colonel McLaughlin, an old-time miner of 
Thompson's Falls, Mont., is building a 160- 
acre deer park after me fish-trap pattern. 
The fence is being constructed so the deer 
can easily go inside, but can't possibly get 
out. It is in a section where hundreds of 
deer winter, and Mr. McLaughlin expects 
to corral no small number the coming sea- 
son. He will keep them for breeding pur- 
poses. 



Roland Haslam, the young son of D. A. 
Haslam, of Winchester.'Cal., recently killed 
an eagie measuring 4 feet 3 inches from tip 
to tip. 



Editor Rkcrka riON : 

The coots are now arriving in good num- 
bers, and with them have come the nap h 

thas, exactly as I prophesied in a formei 
letter. 

On Oct. 1 and 3 latin* Ins were bunting 
here all day. We have killed a few birds 50 
far, and expect to do better next week. 

Glen ( love, II. 

TheGrand Pacific Hotel, Chit nUy 

offered a tempting field for some birdf- 

shooter, for on the register appeared tin- 
names of L. R. Forrest, Albany, N. V. I >. 
Sparrow, New York City; T. I. Quail, I 
erdale, Mass.- and C A. Partnd 



Sport is dull out here, for we have n<> 
game left. We would hav< good black 
fishing were it not for the market fishermen, 
but they take everything in their nets, and it 
seems almost impossible to stop them. 

Harry Sims, Council Bluffs, la. 



Elk seem quite plentiful here this y< 
Two have been brought in this week, killed 
within four miles of this town. The det 1 
bunching and within two weeks 1 expect to 
be on their trail. 

Fred Baldwin, Steamboat Springs, 1 !oL 



Deer are seen in this vicinity very often 
and within 15 miles they are numeri 
Grouse have not been so plentiful for \< 
but squirrels are scarce. 

Dr. A. W. Woodman, Plymouth. N. H. 

I have spent the entire summer in 
West, largely in the region of Lake M< I 
aid, on the Great Northern rail* 

Dr. Lyman B. Sperry,